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Thread: Two hand grip

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    South Florida

    Two hand grip

    Although I've been a shooter since the age of 10, I'm only recently a handgun shooter [last 2 years] for purposes of concealed carry and personal defense. I have two pistols - the M&P full size in 9mm and just recently the M&P Shield [also 9mm]. At an informal shoot, one of the instructors who also was a part of the meet up group watched me shoot and said I'd shoot better using the "thumbs forward" two-handed grip rather than the "thumb-on-thumb" grip that I've been using [she called it the "revolver grip"]. That's the second time a professional has volunteered that info [first one was a very helpful member of these forums - thanks, Ian!].

    I'm not at all comfortable with thumbs forward, which I've tried before, and it's a slower way for me to get a two-handed grip from holster to presentation. Is the thumbs forward grip really all that much better?

  2. #2
    #00
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rockville, MD
    Yes.

    It may be harder for you because it's unfamiliar, but that doesn't change the objective fact that it provides better recoil control for fast, accurate shooting.
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    Todd Louis Green, pistol-training.com Train hard & stay safe!
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  3. #3
    The modern combat or thumbs forward grip is IMO currently the best grip to use on a pistol. I am not saying that other grips cannot be successful but the modern combat or thumbs forward is a superior grip. I started shooting revolvers at a young age and in my early formal years of training and working professionally I carried a revolver for a few years and had a classic locked thumb or revolver style grip. Even with a revolver style grip on a pistol I was considered to be a highly proficient shooter and always in the top shooter categories in my peer groups. When I first learned the modern combat or thumbs forward grip my shooting proficiency actually decreased due to the change and it was frustrating. I stuck with it and it took a good week long advanced level pistol course to hammer my old revolver grip out of me and truly adopt this new type of grip. However once I gained high levels of proficiency with this grip it became more natural than the revolver grip and my skills kick started and I progressed rapidly from this point.

    I feel so strongly about the grip I did a 3 part video series on the grip itself.

    Part 1 is the history of the revolver grip and how I saw that it adapted to the pistol.
    Part 1 - History of revolver grip and the pistol

    Part 2 talks about the mechanics, physics and what actually happens during the recoil phase of the pistol and why your grip is so important.
    Part 2 - What happens during recoil and why is the grip so important.

    Part 3 discusses how to establish a good modern combat / thumbs forward grip.
    Part 3 - How to establish a good modern combat or thumbs forward grip.
    The comments made herein are those solely of this writer and in no way reflect the opinions of any other person, agency, or entity.

  4. #4
    S.M.E. & STAFF
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    Surf--Great Job!

  5. #5
    Site Supporter
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    Apr 2012
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Quote Originally Posted by oboe View Post
    I'm not at all comfortable with thumbs forward, which I've tried before, and it's a slower way for me to get a two-handed grip from holster to presentation. Is the thumbs forward grip really all that much better?
    Awesome work, Surf. On a slightly shorter, but similar, note, Paul Gomez did a video on the evolution of grip that I found pretty interesting.

    From a pure physics perspective, the closer you are to the pivot point of the gun during recoil, the less torque your grip will experience.
    Sheep Have Wool

  6. #6
    Todd Jarrett on pistol shooting


  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    So do you still use the revolver style grip when shooting a revolver? I've been shooting mine thumbs forward without issues, although I do take care when I pick up a new one that my thumbs don't reach in front of the cylinder.

    I've noticed that it's less of an issue with the Ruger style cylinder release than the Smith one. The airweights I've shot all drove their cylinder release into my thumb pretty badly.

    Edit: I may have just answered my own question... I noticed your thumb was sticking a lot farther forward than mine was, and in playing around with my hands, I may have been doing the thumbs forward grip wrong all along (ie, not cocking the weak hand forward enough) and not realizing it.
    Last edited by ford.304; 06-21-2012 at 08:04 AM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by ford.304 View Post
    So do you still use the revolver style grip when shooting a revolver? I've been shooting mine thumbs forward without issues, although I do take care when I pick up a new one that my thumbs don't reach in front of the cylinder.

    I've noticed that it's less of an issue with the Ruger style cylinder release than the Smith one. The airweights I've shot all drove their cylinder release into my thumb pretty badly.

    Edit: I may have just answered my own question... I noticed your thumb was sticking a lot farther forward than mine was, and in playing around with my hands, I may have been doing the thumbs forward grip wrong all along (ie, not cocking the weak hand forward enough) and not realizing it.
    I'm quite inexperienced compared to many of the people here, but I use more of a revolver type grip with a revolver. After getting used to the thumbs forward grip with a semi-auto, I used it with a revolver and later noticed the skin of my left thumb was slightly injured, as I had lined it up too near to the rear cylinder gap.

 

 

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