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  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Aurora, CO

    walther ppk/s - used prices?

    Hello,

    I just looked at a used Walther ppk s .380 (smith&wesson) with pac-myer (sp) grips. It comes with three clips and a holster. The store wants $500. The gun appears to be in very good condition, not worn anywhere at all. They have a brand new one for $560. So, buying a used one with grips and a holster for $60 less doesn't sound like that great of a deal. But, I'm new at this; maybe it is. This will be my first gun. I forgot to ask how old the gun is.

    How much value do handguns lose, in particular the american ppk s? It appears they do not depreciate much after purchase. I'll do seem google-searches in addition to what I learn from this thread. Thanks in advance for any advice. Also, if you can point me to any gun value websites, that would be great. Or, if you like any particular gun trader publications.

    Jon
    Last edited by jbeintherockies; 12-07-2011 at 10:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Subject Matter Moron
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Alaska
    An oversized gun with a shitty trigger that only shoots .380ACP isn't worth much to me. YMMV.
    "A good shooter with a weak body and weak mind will lose against one who has the physical ability to crush him, and the mental ability to do it repeatedly"
    -Kyle Defoor

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Papua New Guinea; formerly Florida
    Hey, the PPK is a great gun if you happen to be into slide cut and bite S&M.

    I had one, got rid of it, don't miss it.

  4. #4
    STAFF
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque
    You're not likely to find a lot of support for the purchase you're trying to make. No doubt we have some members that could tell you exactly what that pistol is worth, but that particular firearm is the source of much ire amongst people that take shooting seriously, which this board is nearly entirely composed of.

    Let me ask you this, what's the idea behind your purchase? Are you looking for a pistol to defend you and your loved ones with? A pistol to compete with? A gun to gather a functioning knowledge of the fundamentals of good shooting? If you answered yes to any of these, there is a myriad of vastly better choices.

    Now if you've got a collection of, say, James Bond memorabilia, then sure go for it. Otherwise, probably best to pick something very different.

    It'll be much easier to help you once we know the purpose for your purchase.
    Nobody is impressed by what you can't do. -THJ

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    West Virginia
    Although not the choice of many in the know, I've always appreciated the sleek lines of the PPK series. They are a classic design and one of the first double action semi-autos. Time has passed it by but I've always wanted on just because...Yeah triggers are grungy but James Bond never complained.

  6. #6
    $500 is a tad high for what you describe, but not unreasonable. I will warn that the Smith and Wesson made PPKs are some of the most malignant, crude, non-working examples of that gun design. If you really must have a PPK, and I really hope it is for nostalgic, collectible purposes, seek out an older Interarms made PPK or try and find an actual German mad Walther. They are hard to come across, but thery are out there. Also, again, if you MUST have one, I would get it in .32 ACPas that is the caliber for which the gun was designed for and that chambering tends to be far more relaible than the .380. But again, pleased do not carry such a dated, now worthless and obsolete gun. I have a PPK/S, but it is purely for collectible purposes. Also, James Bond never complained because he is not real. He is a fictional character in books and movies. Had he been real, he would have complained alot and if in real life he had to rely on his PPK like he does in the movies, he would probably be dead.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Aurora, CO

    Purpose of purchase

    Well, I'm just getting into the idea of getting a gun. My Dad has many (mostly old stuff) and this will be the first that I purchase.

    Why the Walther ppk/s:
    I was considering the Walther not because of its Bond heritage, but because of its WW2 (and WW1?) history. I also simply like the look and feel of it. In addition, I have shot 9's (most recently a small S&W at the range and my Dad's Browning Hi Power) and I don't like the recoil. I wanted to try a .380 in hopes it wouldn't recoil as much. However, I haven't actually shot a .380 yet (planning on doing that BEFORE I buy anything). As for range, I *think* all I care about is good accuracy to about 25 yards or so. I don't think I need a 9mm to accomplish that.

    Purpose of the gun:
    Well, that is a good question and I'm not sure I know exactly what I will do with it. Since this will be my first gun, a gun to gather a functioning knowledge of the fundamentals of good shooting is definitely one of the purposes. I definitely will go to the local shooting range and might even consider getting a concealed weapons permit/license. It will also be available for self-defense purposes in my home.

    I *think* for my first gun I want something compact, small caliber (but bigger than a .22) with the ability to conceal if desired, with good accuracy to 25 yards. I think I will start with something like that. I have considered a Ruger MkII .22, which my Dad has, and I have shot a number of times. But, it doesn't do much for me. I still like the way they look though (like an old Luger). It also isn't something that can be easily concealed; I think it is more of a target gun and I think I want something more versatile than that.


    What additional questions do you guys have? Maybe I should start a new thread? The ppk/s headline doesn't reflect the direction that this thread has taken.
    Last edited by jbeintherockies; 12-09-2011 at 08:18 AM.

  8. #8
    STAFF
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Albuquerque
    There have been a few "first gun" threads lately. A search should dig them up.

    From what I've read here, a Glock 19, used, would be a fine choice. Some good basic handgun coursework would also be ideal. Not necessarily in that order.

    Do you have a shooting range near you where you can rent guns? Actually shooting the gun before you buy it often makes it much easier to see if it'll work well for you.

    RE recoil: Good technique is often the difference between being comfortable with the recoil from gun a, and uncomfortable with gun b. Hence the suggestion for good basic handgun training.
    Last edited by BOM; 12-09-2011 at 08:55 AM.
    Nobody is impressed by what you can't do. -THJ

  9. #9
    Poser
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Broad Ripple, downwind from the patchouli refinery.
    I would recommend against it.

    While the S&W-manufactured PPKs fix some of the more glaring problems with the gun's design, by adding a beavertail so the slide won't leave your hand bleeding and improving the design of the ejector, for some reason the long, skinny trigger bar of the Walther design just does not work well with S&W's MIM process. After about the fifth or sixth one sent back with a snapped trigger bar, I just stopped stocking them and would only special order them after telling the customer up front about what I'd seen.

    More or less thoroughly obsolete as a defensive firearm, if you want one just for a shooter, I'd recommend sticking to older German guns. Be aware that postwar Manurhins were shipped across the river and marked as Walthers as well as being sold under the Manure trademark, and can be of wildly varying quality. I've seen some that were gemlike and others that were rough as a cob and wouldn't run worth a damn. Avoid the U.S.-built Interarms guns like the plague that they are.

    (As far as getting one for a first gun to learn shooting? Their triggers are awful, the sights are abysmal & their radius is short, the recoil is amazingly unpleasant for a steel .380 due to the straight blowback operation and grip shape and geometry, and .380 ammo is expensive. I'd have a hard time thinking of a worse gun to learn to shoot with that isn't an alloy-framed .38 snubby. I'd counsel looking into a Ruger or Browning .22 pistol, but if you just have to have something you can CCW, too, then get a 9mm compact service pistol like the Glock 19.)


    EDIT: Heh. I read the first post. Typed my reply, and then went back and read the rest of the thread. Good to know I'm in tune with the hive mind.

    So, yeah, when a bunch of people are more or less spontaneously relating the same experiences, you can take that as a sign.
    Last edited by Tamara; 12-09-2011 at 10:09 AM.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Aurora, CO

    Glock 19

    How many different types of Glock 19s are there? After doing a quick google search, it looks like there is a "regular" Glock 19 and a compact Glock 19. Seems confusing.

    Next, there is the Gen 3, Gen 4 and then the rtf2. What does the rtf2 mean? Based on what I am reading, the rtf2 sounds like a gun for competitions.

    Thanks!

 

 

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