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Thread: Lee Hand press vs Lyman 310 Tong tool?

  1. #21
    Member That Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dov View Post
    My first quick googling into them made them sound good for keeping revolver fed but not sure you could use them for levergun unless you single load.
    As long as you use bullets with crimp grooves, you can make ammunition safe for a tubular magazine with a set like that. As for "keeping a gun fed", well... Loading with a set like that is bloody slow. So I'd say it depends on the guns appetite.

    Additionally, in reality you really do need a better way of measuring powder than the scoop that comes with the kit. So it's not really a self-contained all-you-need kit in that sense. (Fortunately , simple beam scales are inexpensive and not that large.) A separate priming tool is recommended, as well. (Also available inexpensively and without a huge space penalty.) Cleaning spent brass is of course not addressed by that kit, so you need to think of a way to do that as well. Realistically, the most useful way to use that kit is to buy fresh brass - just flare it, prime it, charge it, seat the bullet, crimp it. As soon as you have to mess with re-sizing old brass etc, the process takes bloody ages...
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  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Dov View Post
    ...not sure you could use them for levergun unless you single load.
    They roll crimp as hard as you want to hit them.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by SCCY Marshal View Post
    They roll crimp as hard as you want to hit them.
    Thanks, wasn't clear to me from youtubes I watched about them that it would crimp that strongly.

    And from Lee's site for the 30-30 one "The Classic Lee Loader neck sizes only. This is not recommended for semi-auto, pump and lever action guns." https://leeprecision.com/lee-loader-30-30-win

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by That Guy View Post
    As for "keeping a gun fed", well... Loading with a set like that is bloody slow. So I'd say it depends on the guns appetite.
    Heh

    I do have a scale, and I think a hand priming tool. It's been long time since I used my reloading stuff, well over a decade. Need to dig it out and see what dies I have for sure. I gave buddy of mine that reloads regularly my powder and most of my primers back ~2008 when I first started having health issues.

    Showed gf youtube of someone loading with that and she found it amusing like I do using a mallet instead of a press to assemble ammo.

    Might load a few rounds together, wouldn't surprise me if she actually like reloading. She's type of person that needs to always be doing something like her crafts or whatever even when shes watching TV/movies.

  5. #25
    Hillbilly Elitist Malamute's Avatar
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    I dont know why the Lee site said they werent suitable for levers, I loaded many hundreds of rounds of 30-30 and 45-70 for levers with lee Loaders, the main issue is using brass from the same gun, if you use someone elses brass it may nor fit your chamber unless full length resized. Chamber checking them as fired brass or loaded rounds can alleviate any embarrassing moments. Lyman/Ideal made tap-in full length sizers (they called them shell resizers) with a rod to tap the shell back out if the shells from your gun eventually become too fat to chamber with only neck sizing. I dont recall it being an issue with the Winchester 94 30-30, or Marlin 1895 or Winchester 1886.

    Lyman shell resizer example https://www.ebay.com/itm/375271943476


    Quote Originally Posted by That Guy View Post
    As long as you use bullets with crimp grooves, you can make ammunition safe for a tubular magazine with a set like that. As for "keeping a gun fed", well... Loading with a set like that is bloody slow. So I'd say it depends on the guns appetite.

    Additionally, in reality you really do need a better way of measuring powder than the scoop that comes with the kit. So it's not really a self-contained all-you-need kit in that sense. (Fortunately , simple beam scales are inexpensive and not that large.) A separate priming tool is recommended, as well. (Also available inexpensively and without a huge space penalty.) Cleaning spent brass is of course not addressed by that kit, so you need to think of a way to do that as well. Realistically, the most useful way to use that kit is to buy fresh brass - just flare it, prime it, charge it, seat the bullet, crimp it. As soon as you have to mess with re-sizing old brass etc, the process takes bloody ages...

    Cleaning shells has mainly been wiping them off with a clean cloth for most of my reloading experience. It was maybe 10 or 12 years after I first started reloading that I knew anyone with a vibratory case cleaner, I had some shells fired with black powder cleaned by a friend with a case cleaner, but it was another 15 or 20 years before i got one, and dont use it every time by any means. Im pretty sure one could only wipe the shells off and be fine so long as no corrosion was present. I clean the case lube off with a rag and rubbing alcohol after sizing, so i guess my rifle shells get a little more attention. Most of my reloaded ammo takes on somewhat of a patina look. It doesnt really bother me.

    The Lee powder scoops/measures work OK, well enough for basic reloading. Part of this entire question is a compact basic setup, which the scoops do fine. Keep in mind factory loads are loaded by volume, not every charge weighed, it isnt much different as far as consistency if one is careful an follows the directions. If I were thrown back to using them only I wouldnt lose any sleep over it, only its not as quick as a measure that drops charges.

    Agree about a better priming tool as has been mentioned, and adding the full Lee powder measure set (scoops) to give more flexibility with various powders and bullet weights and reduced charges. It looks like the set is up to around $20 including shipping. https://www.ebay.com/p/2173094607

    Instructions for Lee powder dipper type measures https://support.leeprecision.net/en/...re-dippers-kit
    Last edited by Malamute; 07-10-2024 at 06:33 PM.
    “Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Malamute View Post
    I dont know why the Lee site said they werent suitable for levers, I loaded many hundreds of rounds of 30-30 and 45-70 for levers with lee Loaders, the main issue is using brass from the same gun, if you use someone elses brass it may nor fit your chamber unless full length resized. Chamber checking them as fired brass or loaded rounds can alleviate any embarrassing moments. Lyman/Ideal made tap-in full length sizers (they called them shell resizers) with a rod to tap the shell back out if the shells from your gun eventually become too fat to chamber with only neck sizing. I dont recall it being an issue with the Winchester 94 30-30, or Marlin 1895 or Winchester 1886.

    Lyman shell resizer example https://www.ebay.com/itm/375271943476





    Cleaning shells has mainly been wiping them off with a clean cloth for most of my reloading experience. It was maybe 10 or 12 years after I first started reloading that I knew anyone with a vibratory case cleaner, I had some shells fired with black powder cleaned by a friend with a case cleaner, but it was another 15 or 20 years before i got one, and dont use it every time by any means. Im pretty sure one could only wipe the shells off and be fine so long as no corrosion was present. I clean the case lube off with a rag and rubbing alcohol after sizing, so i guess my rifle shells get a little more attention. Most of my reloaded ammo takes on somewhat of a patina look. It doesnt really bother me.

    The Lee powder scoops/measures work OK, well enough for basic reloading. Part of this entire question is a compact basic setup, which the scoops do fine. Keep in mind factory loads are loaded by volume, not every charge weighed, it isnt much different as far as consistency if one is careful an follows the directions. If I were thrown back to using them only I wouldnt lose any sleep over it, only its not as quick as a measure that drops charges.

    Agree about a better priming tool as has been mentioned, and adding the full Lee powder measure set (scoops) to give more flexibility with various powders and bullet weights and reduced charges. It looks like the set is up to around $20 including shipping. https://www.ebay.com/p/2173094607

    Instructions for Lee powder dipper type measures https://support.leeprecision.net/en/...re-dippers-kit
    Thanks!

    Will probably get one for gf's 30-30, our only 30-30 currently, and I know I don't have 30-30 dies. Price for Lee Loaders seem comparable to price of dies.

    And both of us find them neat/amusing.

    Though I'm sure I'll get regular 30-30 dies as well, am curious about the tap resizer dies might have to one of those just to see how easy/hard it works.

    If you have more info related to 30-30 or 45-70 and loading with the Lee Loaders or in general please share.

    The gf really likes muzzle light rifles/carbines but doesn't care for AR much, she loves her Marlin 336Y and everything she picks up one of the short barreled 45-70 leverguns she has to tell me she likes those as well.

    If we get a 45-70 would be looking for 2-3 ~trapdoor level loads: something like this hardcast from Garrett https://www.garrettcartridges.com/4570Sprng.html some type of regular softpoint/hollowpoint.

  7. #27
    Found this thread about those full length sizing dies https://castboolits.gunloads.com/sho...sizer-question

    Sounds like most there could tap them with pistol cartridges, but used arbor press (best) or bench vise with rifle cartridges. Hammering for rifle cartridges didn't seem to work well.

  8. #28
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    The issue with the Lyman 310 is leverage. Simply put, there is not enough. It makes loading harder than it needs to be. The Lee Hand Press is better. The Buchanan press is awesome. I often use mine when doing load development as I can do it at the range. It uses the Hornady L-N-L system, which makes things much simpler. It is pricey at ~$300, so it only makes sense for load development, precision reloading, or reloading when traveling.

  9. #29
    I started with the W.H. English Pak-Tool, kind of an intermediate between the Lyman and the Lee. I soon got over that and put a Rockchucker on a narrow stand.
    Here is the Lee press stand. Mine was homemade.
    I put a card table beside it for components. When not in use the stand with press was in the corner, the card table folded up.

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1012829921?pid=324379
    Code Name: JET STREAM

  10. #30
    Site Supporter MGW's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    Kansas
    I think I would rather have a single stage. They don’t take up much room and they’re a lot more versatile. If you go deeper down the reloading rabbit hole you’ll find a lot of uses for them, even if you pick up something like a 550 later. If you look around locally, you can probably find a used Rock Chucker cheap. You’re going to spend the money on carbide dies, powder scales, etc already. A good single stage isn’t going to cost much more or take up much more space.

    My experience with hand presses is from hanging around bench shooters. I don’t think there is anything wrong with them. The Lee is the only one I remember seeing anyone use.
    “If you know the way broadly you will see it in everything." - Miyamoto Musashi

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