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Thread: The Patterned Compliance Pistol

  1. #301
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Blackburn View Post
    What about dry fire testing?

    How is the accessibility as far as acquiring a solid grip consistently within the PCP context?
    The grip is compromised in both and I don't see one having an advantage over the other in that regard, subjectively.

  2. #302
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthNarc View Post
    The grip is compromised in both and I don't see one having an advantage over the other in that regard, subjectively.
    I thought it might be.

    The DeSantis Nemesis works great for a plain P-32 for rear pocket carry in terms of stability and access.

    However I acquired a new P-32 and mounted the ArmaLaser TR1. For that set up the appropriate DeSantis Nemesis N38 G5 does not fit as well.

    Another holster brand is on the way that has a lot of positive reviews and hopefully it will work better.
    Are you loyal to the constitution or the “institution”?

  3. #303
    Site Supporter jandbj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SouthNarc View Post
    The grip is compromised in both and I don't see one having an advantage over the other in that regard, subjectively.
    Try out the southpaw aholster I gave you with the pistols. Might be perfect with an added pad of leather or mousepad on the outbound side to further the wallet illusion of the recluse holsters.

    The idea also reminds me of the style of Greg Kramer’s pocket holsters.

  4. #304
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Face Gremlin View Post
    Mr. Douglas....any commentary on the Recluse holsters yet......look very well made and considering ordering...waiting for an opinion on the two designs......thanks.
    My Recluse should be here later this week. I ordered the single sided version...but my LCP lives in my front pocket so it's a little different application.
    3/15/2016

  5. #305
    For those that expressed an interest in the 25 Auto Federal Punch, Midway has it in stock.

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1026826297?pid=445730

  6. #306
    Quote Originally Posted by YeseniaBuck View Post
    The upgrades you've made to the P32, such as the Innovative Weaponry sights, polished barrel and feed ramp, and Wolff recoil springs, suggest a commitment to optimizing the performance and handling of the pistol for your intended use. These upgrades may enhance your ability to manipulate and shoot the pistol effectively in close-quarters situations.
    Yes…

  7. #307
    Mr. Douglas....what are your thoughts regarding carrying more than one gun....lets say a primary 9mm or .45acp IWB and a mouse in the rear pocket. Does your expertise and experience in both hands on and / or street robbery lend itself to this type of daily carry or do you feel this is overkill, excuse the pun. IYO, is more better.

  8. #308
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Face Gremlin View Post
    Mr. Douglas....what are your thoughts regarding carrying more than one gun....lets say a primary 9mm or .45acp IWB and a mouse in the rear pocket. Does your expertise and experience in both hands on and / or street robbery lend itself to this type of daily carry or do you feel this is overkill, excuse the pun. IYO, is more better.
    I'm not Craig, but I'll throw my hat in anyway.

    The PCP is a specific application just like the pocket J frame is a different application of what might seem like the same thing but really isn't.

    Think of it like this: Some problems you need to solve will need a socket wrench. Some will need a hammer. Some will need a chainsaw. One tool does not cover all the problems you might face. It is reasonable, then, to make an intelligent assessment of the most likely problems you will face and carry the tools for that. On a daily basis I generally have my usual carry gun (a dot-equipped M&P pistol) and either a pocket J or my Ruger LCP that serves as my PCP. The M&P is for the typical concealed carry threat of oh, there's a lethal threat time to draw and shoot.

    The pocket J works good as what I refer to as MUC with a gun, where I'm seeing a concern but there's time and space to maybe maneuver and avoid the issue but I need a backup plan in case MUC doesn't work. I'll give an example because it illustrates the point AND lets me point out the folly of John Hearne. So we're heading back from Tac Con a couple of years ago, and we get passed by Hearne doing "I have a badge" speed. Not terribly long after that, we pass his truck broken down on the side of I40 outside Memphis and naturally we re-route to go see what was up. He had a flat.

    We're starting and Ashton and I about the same time catch sight of a dude a couple hundred yards away heading right for us. On the side of an interstate. "Who walks down the side of an interstate?" you may be asking, and you're right. People who are stupid, people who are desperate, or people who are dangerous. Or all three.

    Now I don't know what he's approaching for, but it's Memphis and we're three white dudes on the side of the road. As it was Hearne's truck and Ashton has far more experience fixing farm equipment than I do, they busied themselves getting the tire fixed and I took up a point for dealing with the approach of the unknown contact. He approached and I suppose noting me standing there facing him and not taking my eyes off of him for even a second, about 30 yards out he took his hat off and put it in both hands out in front of him and put on a friendly face. And he walked right on by us heading down the road.

    The entire time he was in any sort of reasonable range, my hand was in my pocket around the grip of a S&W 638 loaded with wadcutters. As he approached I engaged him with socially neutral language and maneuvered as needed to keep him from being able to do anything to the other two without getting an answer from me first. No violence was necessary either because he had no intent in the first place or because as he got closer we "failed the interview" to borrow a phrase from William Aprill. I don't know which, and I don't care.

    That's what the pocket J is good for, that kind of ambiguous situation where you have a specific concern but you're not yet to the level where you can start to obviously get ready to use a gun. Being able to MUC with a gun is a highly useful tactic that I've deployed dozens of times. For that reason, I will often be carrying a pocket J when I'm travelling or running errands. It's extra bulk in the pocket but with the way I'm usually dressed I can pull it off and have a highly effective way of being in condition orange, physically prepared to do condition black stuff in a split second, and yet to anyone looking on I appear perfectly casual. That is highly useful.

    The PCP is a different thing altogether. It's the tool you reach for when the problem is you turn a corner and there's a gun in your face. This is different than a MUC scenario. It means some stuff has gone really, really wrong for you and now you are in the deepest part of an initiative deficit. Maybe your awesome situational awareness superpowers that the interwebs thinks exist failed you. Maybe you're with other people and you didn't have the ability to actually MUC in the first place...because bad guys will rob groups of people, too. Whatever the reason, dude is there ordering you to run your pockets and you're betting your future on whether or not he's going to stroke the trigger on you remembering that the only "losses" from the Rangemaster student data are people who didn't have a gun, were perfectly cooperative with the criminals robbing them, and then got executed anyway.

    So does it make sense to carry two guns? Hell yes. Given what I've outlined above you could deduce that there's a case for three guns. The belt carried big gun, the pocket J to MUC with a reasonable handgun, and the PCP in case you find yourself in the worst case scenario. And, yeah...that's true. There's a good case for all of them.

    Is it practical to carry three guns? Not for me, at least I don't see myself doing that in most situations.

    If you have to dress nice and go to an urban area with non-permissive environments to earn money or handle some personal business, packing three pistols is probably not practical. Packing two might be, but a duty-sized pistol might not be practical. So you might decide that if the street robbery is your most likely problem, you carry a pocket J up front and a PCP behind the wallet. Or maybe it's even more restrictive and so the PCP is all you can get away with.

    If you're a cop and you realize the need for another gun might manifest when you're on the ground grappling with a violent asshole, an ankle J might make a lot of sense because you can easily reach it when you're on your back and some asshole is trying to shoot you with your own pistol:



    How many options do you want? Well, all of them. But the options come with costs and that's where you have to think through what's practical for you.

    I have a number of handguns partially because I'm an idiot and I buy guns because they're neat. But a lot of them were bought because they give me an option in a niche where I didn't have something previously. I don't particularly want to use a Ruger LCP in self defense, but I have one because there are times where it makes sense. The PCP use being a good example of a bang-on application for that pistol.

    People often come at this wrong thinking "what are the odds I'll need two guns?" not seeming to realize that's not the question most of the time. Sometimes that second gun isn't a backup gun but is actually Plan A for a specific circumstance or scenario. It comes down to you doing some realistic thinking about what you'll be doing, where you'll be doing it, and what the most likely set of threats you'll face will be.

    It's just like packing tools for any other endeavor. You can't always take the whole toolbox, so you do your best to identify what problems you are likely to encounter and you carry tools that address that and still remain flexible enough to give you something you can work with if the unanticipated threat emerges even if it isn't ideal. Or packing a med kit. I can't carry everything that might be useful if I'm around an accident or mass casualty event, so I identify a few things I can readily pack that may not be ideal for the situation but is sure better than standing there with my thumb up my butt.
    3/15/2016

  9. #309
    Murder Machine, Harmless Fuzzball TCinVA's Avatar
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    So on the Recluse:

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    I've been carrying with it for a couple of days. It's not something I would have paid any attention to were it not for Craig's post on it. But I figured if he saw potential value it was worth checking out.

    It adds a little more bulk to the overall package. I bought mine to accommodate the CT laser module on the LCP as it's a game changer for accurate use of such a little gun at speed.

    It really does look like a wallet. Others have to look really hard at it to see what it is.

    The one-sided coverage gives me all the heebies and jeebies, but it's turned out to not be an issue. The trigger nestles into the foam pad in the center and it's sufficiently well fitted that it will not allow the trigger to actually pull unless you separate the gun from the holster. I wondered how well the pistol would be held in place but so far despite doing a fair bit of walking, getting in and out of chairs, getting in and out of vehicles, and doing some squats and lunges in my office the gun hasn't separated from the holster when carried in my front pocket.

    When you want to draw the gun, the holster readily gives it up. By starting your fingers between the holster and the grip of the gun, you lever it out to the side and the holster pops right off without hesitation. It clears better than the Desantis pocket holster I've been using for years.

    Reholstering, however, kind of sucks. Or at least I haven't gotten the hang of doing it yet.

    It forces a better arrangement of items in my pocket, which I did not expect. I carry it in my right front pocket. I also have a money clip, a key bar, and usually a car key in that pocket. The key bar rides nicely along the holster where the top of the gun sits and gets sort of held there. The money clip is magnetic and actually holds in place along the slide of the pistol towards the muzzle end. That leaves space for a key/fob out toward the grip area. When inserted and arranged, all of that stays in more or less that configuration and allows me to easily access any of the items individually without any fuss. With the Desantis, I'd occasionally end up with the gym tag or something inside the holster with the LCP or generally having to unfuck something in the pocket to get my normal gear out. Not so with this, at least so far. And the gun has never given even the hint of coming free of the holster on its own.

    It's a well contained enough little package that the odd bit of lint or gum wrapper detritus doesn't have much chance to actually get into anything important on the gun.

    So far, so good.

    My only criticism is that as a package, it's a little bulkier than I'd like. A good bit of that is just the consequence of the LCP in this role vs. the P32. The P32 is a smaller gun. Not by much, but by enough that it serves this particular purpose better. So if you don't currently have a PCP and you're wondering should I get the P32 or an LCP, P32 most def.
    3/15/2016

  10. #310
    A little PCP demo in ECQC in South Florida this past weekend with the Tokyo Marui airsoft LCP.

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