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Thread: "Don't Outrun Your Headlights"

  1. #91
    Site Supporter JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyesquared View Post
    If you’re a tactical shooter slowing down is never the answer,.
    That right there is why I enjoy his content but I take it with a grain of contextual salt, not carrying how many tango's he's decked. I suspect his full explanations in a class will go much deeper than "never". But that's just a guess.
    "I’ve come to realize manual transmission cars and 1911s have something in common—a person who steals one probably won’t know how to use it." - Hideeho

  2. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    Oh! Perfect! Thanks for the context! I don’t Instagram so I didn’t have the context.

    I agree completely with Matt. He’s delta or special forces, right?

    Regarding turtle and hoser, I think those guys sometimes get vilified by FUDDs not realizing neither is the goal and if you ever saw Max Michel or other top GMs shoot they never look rushed, just efficient with a shit ton of alphas at speed.

    That’s kind of the point I was making. More skill is more skill and opens up options.

    Most people practice handguns as a sport or hobby and it’s a different bucket of opportunity cost than self defense tactical classes.
    Former Delta.

    I think to the question of practice I think for better or for worse many people do treat self defense / tactics as their hobby and prioritization needs to happen. But getting really good at shooting matches (the right way) means being able to apply the right level of shot confirmation prior to sending it, on any given target from a full USPSA at 2 yards vs partials/steel at 30-40.

    I think it's also interesting that at my local club there was a time when we were putting up a lot of no-shoots behind steel targets - basically a no fail type shot (at least in a match context). During tear down I would rarely see more than a handful of holes in the no-shoot, for a match with 60+ shooters with skill levels all over the place.

  3. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    That right there is why I enjoy his content but I take it with a grain of contextual salt, not carrying how many tango's he's decked. I suspect his full explanations in a class will go much deeper than "never". But that's just a guess.
    I agree he has a way of phrasing that tends to come across as strongly opinionated. I think he is one of those people I mentioned who started out shooting controlled all the time and does not have any real trouble reverting to that when needed.

  4. #94
    Deadeye Dick Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlw View Post
    The LAPD female officer (McBride?) that was in a shooting a year or so ago shot at roughly .5 splits in the incident, but there is plenty of video of her burning it down on a square range.
    "You can never have too many knives." --Joe Ambercrombie
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  5. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    And all those people in the background ....

  6. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by Redhat View Post
    And all those people in the background ....
    According to Pat Rogers post on Lightfighter years ago, after the NYPD shooting on Times Square (IIRC), those are just blobs and don't count.

    Don't know, maybe he'd have stood behind that statement if someone he'd taught got in a jam.
    Adding nothing to the conversation since 2015....

  7. #97
    I’ve been thinking about the push for speed and “prepping” the trigger while presenting the gun. The more I contemplate it, the more I think it may be a bad way to train for a self defense scenario. Is this circumventing the assessment process? And setting one up for some unintended consequences?

  8. #98
    Deadeye Dick Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corse View Post
    I’ve been thinking about the push for speed and “prepping” the trigger while presenting the gun. The more I contemplate it, the more I think it may be a bad way to train for a self defense scenario. Is this circumventing the assessment process? And setting one up for some unintended consequences?
    If someone is training to fire no matter what every time they draw the gun, that's a huge problem. But, getting on the trigger as soon as the muzzle is pointed at the target can be a valid technique for a faster shot, assuming that shot must be taken. It seems to me that we need to train for scenarios ranging from

    • Fire a shot as fast as humanly possible. See John Correa's numbers, listed in this article.
    • Draw to a ready position, finger off trigger.
    "You can never have too many knives." --Joe Ambercrombie
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  9. #99
    Deadeye Dick Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    I'm going to break out some posts to RR/GD, where I'm hoping we can continue to argue respectfully.

    I think there may still be value left in this thread. Stand by.

    OK. Done. Carry on...
    Last edited by Clusterfrack; 08-04-2022 at 06:13 PM.
    "You can never have too many knives." --Joe Ambercrombie
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  10. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by Corse View Post
    I’ve been thinking about the push for speed and “prepping” the trigger while presenting the gun. The more I contemplate it, the more I think it may be a bad way to train for a self defense scenario. Is this circumventing the assessment process? And setting one up for some unintended consequences?
    There are times in dry fire that focus on vision and not working the trigger should be the focus. Hopefully during those times you don't find yourself prepping the trigger. I would also say when pushing speed on the draw you should isolate the draw and not working the trigger when you get to the sub .8 .7 draws

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