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Thread: School me on SIRT

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    Sorry Iím being obtuse?

    Why canít you do #1 or #3 with that set up?

    Are you saying itís because they want to train with semi-autos instead of revolvers?

    A lot of people pocket revolvers and for those that do, I donít see why it wouldnít work for #1 and #3 as well?


    Because pointing a real gun at someone is stupid and irresponsible.
    For info about training or to contact me:
    Immediate Action Combatives

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Cecil Burch View Post
    Because pointing a real gun at someone is stupid and irresponsible.
    Gotcha! Thanks for clarifying.
    Currently Iím still within the acceptable dickhead parameter of PF 2017+.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    Gotcha! Thanks for clarifying.

    I know I am approaching the problem from the perspective of an instructor, and few people are going to have my POV, but I think it helps to give the "why" even of a frame of reference that is not the norm.
    For info about training or to contact me:
    Immediate Action Combatives

  4. #24
    Member psalms144.1's Avatar
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    I don't think the SIRT is even goodish as a dry fire trainer, personally. The trigger on mine was not even close to a simulator for any Glock trigger I've ever felt. The grip was Glock-ish, but didn't really match the G17, IMHO.

    But, like Cecil said, I used the ever-loving dog poop out of mine while demonstrating on the range; teaching tactics indoors; doing defensive tactics with retention/takeways, pretty much anything that involved pointing a pistol-ish item at people. A blue gun does just as well, but doesn't allow trigger manipulation at all, and doesn't allow you to demonstrate, visibly and easily, what it means to "laser" someone or something you don't want to.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by jellydonut View Post
    What is that? I was just going to get the IR version along with the targets intended for it, if I did go for the laser version. I don't want the distraction of a visible laser dot.
    I'm not sure I understand, AFAIK, the IR requires something to read the strike, in my case an IR camera, and then something to display/record the hits, in my case the LASR Classic software.

    The targets that come with the CoolFire system come with the visible laser, not the IR. CoolFire does sell targets that react to the IR laser, but IMO they are pricey:

    This reactive target stand is $99 for one or $315 for five:

    https://coolfiretrainer.com/asccusto...art=0&recNum=0

    This one is the pretty well-known LASERPET which sells for $115 each:

    https://coolfiretrainer.com/asccusto...art=0&recNum=1

    I use Ben Stoeger Dry-Fire Kits as well as targets I print off on the printer and have the copy play run off on heavy paper.

    For Action Pistol: https://benstoegerproshop.com/scaled...pers-and-dots/

    For USPSA: https://benstoegerproshop.com/scaled...pers-and-dots/
    Adding nothing to the conversation since 2015....

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    I finally got one myself last year and I really like it a lot. I credit it to helping me maintain some semblence of trigger press as my live fire volume cut in half. The safety margin and convenience is appealing to me.

    I'm also predisposed to their effectiveness from the experience of the older lad returning home to visit one holiday and having gone roughly 8 mos without firing a live fire shot but working his SIRT daily. He burned me down at the range at every distance, every drill. Now, other variables at play. He's a crazy athlete, "strong like buul" and was a very serious student of the pistol before that hiatus. But plenty good athletes can lose a sense of pressing the trigger right.

    It is my opinion based on no science, that all trigger presses are valuable trigger presses. The concentration on the grip and a press without moving the sights etc translates across platforms. Not perfectly but I think there is some overlap. But I can't prove that.

    So . . . YMMV

    Another single anecdote. Shortly after the SIRT came out I gifted one to my brother in law who is a member of a unique police unit where they spend countless hours together waiting for some excitement.

    His department is notoriously short on practice and training time with their weapons.

    They spent a lot of time with the SIRT over about a 4 month period doing unstructured practice while shooting the breeze and hanging out as groups of guys tend to do.

    On their next qualification the team dramatically improved their scores with each member reaching a personal best and the team scoring what may to be the highest of any team in the units history.

    The guys carry a mix of pistols from heavy steel DAO to striker guns. I had the factory specially set the trigger as heavy as mechanically possible although there was no science behind that choice.

    It may be that those of us who maintain a practice level closer to our personal peak performance need more exact replicas of our training gear but for most people I think Iím with the ďall trigger presses are valuableĒ side.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by EPF View Post
    It may be that those of us who maintain a practice level closer to our personal peak performance need more exact replicas of our training gear but for most people I think Iím with the ďall trigger presses are valuableĒ side.
    That was a great anecdote, thanks for sharing!

    Iíll make a qualification about peak performance and trigger presses and replicas of training gear that might be helpful.

    As a contextual ďthis is how I know what I knowĒ: Iím a CO GM in USPSA and GM level in PCC and working on revolver.

    1. I want exact replicas of training gear for dry practice mainly for the non shooting things: draw, reloads, transitionsÖ but trigger press fidelity is not important. Many high level shooters donít even pull the trigger when practicing (I do for the strength training).

    2. Agree with ďall trigger presses are valuable.Ē

    What you wound up doing for them was trigger finger weight training and isolation. Itís something thatís very important and something I do with heavy DA revolvers even when Iím shooting 1# SA short reset triggers in competition.

    Strength and speed in trigger press are proportional. Working revolvers helps my PCC triggering if that makes sense.

    Itís the reason I recommend people work weak hand dry with revolvers to build strength.

    Kudos to you for helping them train efficiently. It often doesnít take more time out of the day, just better use of down time.

    @TGS when I started dry firing in 2019, the only change to my life was that I cut out watching television and movies. Thatís it. No extra commitment needed and I spent / spend 20-40 min a day handling firearms. It was a straight swap for mindless television.
    Last edited by JCN; 02-16-2022 at 07:30 AM.
    Currently Iím still within the acceptable dickhead parameter of PF 2017+.

  8. #28
    Does Not Work For You TGS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    @TGS when I started dry firing in 2019, the only change to my life was that I cut out watching television and movies. Thatís it. No extra commitment needed and I spent / spend 20-40 min a day handling firearms. It was a straight swap for mindless television.
    Why are you tagging me in response in a thread and topic that I have no involvement in? I'm lacking context as to what my relevance and interest is here.
    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by TGS View Post
    Why are you tagging me in response in a thread and topic that I have no involvement in? I'm lacking context as to what my relevance and interest is here.
    Context. Read EPFís anecdote above.

    He gifted a LEO squad a training tool and with no structured practice and no extra time except during down time, they got better.

    And your assumption about my training below.

    Quote Originally Posted by TGS View Post
    Most people do not have the time or money to shoot as much as you apparently do. Thus, for most shooters, it behooves them to make decisions based on logic instead of emotion, which was the decision making tree used in the post in question which spurred the discussion about carry rotations.

    Like, yeah, I could spend all of my freetime shooting like you do...then I wouldn't have the time or the money to do the other things I want to do in life, as well.
    So contextually, just like the anecdote above. No commitment above what they were doing before and they improved a lot.

    For me, I only spend 20-40 min a day handling guns and it was a direct swap for television watching.

    You can get a shit ton done in a short period of time and it doesnít have to be all-encompassing.
    Currently Iím still within the acceptable dickhead parameter of PF 2017+.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    That was a great anecdote, thanks for sharing!

    Iíll make a qualification about peak performance and trigger presses and replicas of training gear that might be helpful.

    As a contextual ďthis is how I know what I knowĒ: Iím a CO GM in USPSA and GM level in PCC and working on revolver.

    1. I want exact replicas of training gear for dry practice mainly for the non shooting things: draw, reloads, transitionsÖ but trigger press fidelity is not important. Many high level shooters donít even pull the trigger when practicing (I do for the strength training).

    2. Agree with ďall trigger presses are valuable.Ē

    What you wound up doing for them was trigger finger weight training and isolation. Itís something thatís very important and something I do with heavy DA revolvers even when Iím shooting 1# SA short reset triggers in competition.

    Strength and speed in trigger press are proportional. Working revolvers helps my PCC triggering if that makes sense.

    Itís the reason I recommend people work weak hand dry with revolvers to build strength.

    Kudos to you for helping them train efficiently. It often doesnít take more time out of the day, just better use of down time.

    @TGS when I started dry firing in 2019, the only change to my life was that I cut out watching television and movies. Thatís it. No extra commitment needed and I spent / spend 20-40 min a day handling firearms. It was a straight swap for mindless television.
    Interesting, I've never heard anyone talk about "trigger finger weight training" before but that makes sense.

    Maybe that's why I shoot revolvers better than autoloaders - finger being trained from recreational climbing?

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