Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: BJJ vs Muay thai

  1. #21
    Member orionz06's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    As someone who ain't good at any of this, BJJ (or the wrestling base Southnarc suggests) is the fastest way to survival and breathing room, so to speak. Being able to default to something, survive, realize you're OK, and then do something is amazing. MT, and others, just don't give you that. There's also the stay on your feet thing that comes from BJJ, while also having an answer to getting back to your feet, or having a response on the ground. The teaching/learning method is also the best. You're typically gonna have a balls out fight before you leave BJJ. You're gonna know what does and doesn't work. Your melon simply can't take that in striking.
    Think for yourself. Question authority.

  2. #22
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Quote Originally Posted by SouthNarc View Post
    Agreed. And the best way to stay on your feet is to gain the posture learned from wrestling.

    Wrestling should be the base in my opinion that everything else branches from.
    Out of curiosity, do you find you prefer any particular style of wrestling?

    I would think Greco would be a fantastic base for all the clinch work/entangled fighting, but my understanding is that Greco is a little less common here in the states.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by 45dotACP View Post
    Out of curiosity, do you find you prefer any particular style of wrestling?

    I would think Greco would be a fantastic base for all the clinch work/entangled fighting, but my understanding is that Greco is a little less common here in the states.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
    Most of the ShivWorks curriculum is driven by Greco. In fact the four hour common module to ECQC and EWO is "The Base of and Strategy for using Greco/Roman Wrestling in a Weapons Based Environment".

  4. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SC
    I was a blue belt, but that’s increasingly further away. I say that to classify myself. I think the repeated mantra in BJJ of “Position before submission” translates to this really well. Wrestling is getting your opponent in a position well. My take-downs needed the most work. To be honest, I want to put my kids in wrestling (years from now 7 months and 2.5 years old) because they’ll be in durable shape and young enough to heal quickly and learn.

    But I feel like getting positional dominance and being able to get it when you need it is a way to turn a fight. BJJ’s great *when* you can get your opponent to the ground or to steer a scramble a certain way.

    Anyway, I just find it really interesting and encouraging that wrestling is what’s being recommended highly because I honestly was already partially to this realization but it’s rewarding. Some day I’ll try to get back in to it.
    Last edited by BWT; 12-30-2021 at 08:45 PM.
    God Bless,

    Brandon

  5. #25
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    New Hampshire
    I have not trained in bjj outside the Pat Miletich camp and mcmap. I wrestled in highschool in Illinois too along with a little judo. Besides that my background is striking. I started tang soo do when I was 6 and did a year or two of several other styles after I got my black belt. Including Okinawa and Thailand.

    I think being able to be a very good striker is very important. I've ended altercations with a few hard fast strikes. Mostly it showed the other person I wasn't going to back down. Most ended with the person leaving.

    I think grappling is a very good skill to have and for me, is harder to learn. I was a decent wrestler in HS. The guy who took my varsity spot my senior year did so because I graduated early to enlist. I think he got 3rd at State. The only times I've utilized aspects of grappling is as a bouncer holding people for the cops (which is miserable in the snow) and during restraints in the psych hospital, not that I'd wrestle the patient but body mechanics carried over great.

    I can't say one is more important but because grappling for me is harder to get good I'd say start there but do both.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    ATL
    Huge proponent of BJJ and MT. Find a gym that offers both. Before I had my kiddos I was training about 10 hours a week. Sparring taught me to keep cool, think on your feet, keep your emotions in check, that was so helpful! I think both these arts will get ypu where you want, and are efficient. BJJ white belt at a year is still pretty damn tough. I asked my professor once, A Red Belt himself, what did a blackbelt offer? He said as purple, brown you will be able to submit and choke alot of people, but as a Black Belt you will be able to choke to submit most anyone. He is 145lbs wringing wet, and I watched him submit a pro 235lb wrestler in about a minute, humbling.

  7. #27
    I’m a fan of and recommend both BJJ and MT and have trained in them a fair amount, but I’m no authority on either. I think the idea of wrestling as a base also has a great deal of merit.

    My first instructor as a kid was a pretty interesting guy. The classes were advertised as Shotokan Karate, but he was a former Navy boxer and high school wrestler who incorporated both heavily into his classes along with a dash of Judo.

    He worked with local wrestling programs and quite a few of the kids from the the local high school were also enrolled in his karate classes, so we were on the mats learning how to stuff takedowns and working out of the clinch as early as the mid-80’s. I trained there all through high school and I think it was a good foundation.

    One thing he included that few did were what we simply called dumps(putting the opponent on the ground while you remain standing). These were largely modified wrestling and Judo that were once a focus of older karate teachings, but abandoned overtime as karate became more commercialized and sport oriented. I still think they make a lot of sense in the context of self-defense to facilitate an escape, access a weapon or even follow up with soccer kicks and stomps. They don’t really make a whole lot of sense in most sport applications, because of the rules and different goals and perhaps why we don’t see them utilized more, rather than not being practical or ineffective. Although they could be considered more difficult to apply effectively against a trained opponent more or less your equal. Nonetheless, they are just another option and worth exploring IMO. The last time I talked with John Hackleman, he really liked the concept as well for street use and has put out a couple of videos on the topic(that I think are public), so check those out for sure.

  8. #28
    Site Supporter Shotgun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Republic of Texas (Dallas)
    Quote Originally Posted by Totem Polar View Post
    IF you can find an instructor who understands how to 1, work with broken-ass old adults, and 2, how to integrate wrestling into real-world defensive applications, then I might tend to agree. Those guys don’t grow on trees, but they’re out there—including several of our mods here.
    That's the truth.
    "Rich," the Old Man said dreamily, "is a little whiskey to drink and some food to eat and a roof over your head and a fish pole and a boat and a gun and a dollar for a box of shells." Robert Ruark

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Polecat View Post
    I asked my professor once, A Red Belt himself, what did a blackbelt offer? He said as purple, brown you will be able to submit and choke alot of people, but as a Black Belt you will be able to choke to submit most anyone. He is 145lbs wringing wet, and I watched him submit a pro 235lb wrestler in about a minute, humbling.
    Even more impressive given his age. He must be pushing 70 or more.

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    ATL
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Racoon View Post
    Even more impressive given his age. He must be pushing 70 or more.
    Yeah, it choked me up and humbled me when he said, “ there are only nine of us in the WORLD!” Unreal

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •