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Thread: blr's Vorpal Spring +5

  1. #1
    Site Supporter BLR's Avatar
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    blr's Vorpal Spring +5

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    BLR, which braided recoil springs do you recommend for 1911s?
    I use these guys exclusively.

    http://www.amwsprings.com/

    Twisted wire mag and recoil springs are the way to go IMO.

    Todd - you underestimate the inertia of ignorance, false knowledge, and tradition. Besides, how many pistols, much less 1911s, ever see 100,000 rounds?

  2. #2
    We are diminished
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    So let's suppose I'd like to replace the springs on my Metalform 10rd 9mm magazines. The mags seem great but the springs are weak.

    What exactly would be involved?
    Any idea on what the minimum quantity would be?
    Can you tell me roughly what you're paying for your custom mag springs?

    Ditto the recoil springs. I just ordered a handful of different spring weights to figure out exactly what I want (11-14, variable and non) and once that's done I'd also be interested to play around with a braided recoil spring.

  3. #3
    Site Supporter BLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToddG View Post
    So let's suppose I'd like to replace the springs on my Metalform 10rd 9mm magazines. The mags seem great but the springs are weak.

    What exactly would be involved?
    Any idea on what the minimum quantity would be?
    Can you tell me roughly what you're paying for your custom mag springs?

    Ditto the recoil springs. I just ordered a handful of different spring weights to figure out exactly what I want (11-14, variable and non) and once that's done I'd also be interested to play around with a braided recoil spring.
    Ok, let's define a few things:
    Weak - spring constant is too low to ensure function
    Relaxation - failure of the spring in a static compressed (all the springs we are talking about are compression springs) state w/o a significant number of cycles (typically a function of the % elastic range used)
    Loss of constant - the typical failure of a firearm spring. A spring will take only so many cycles, which is a function of the % of the elastic range used. Going to a thinner "twisted" spring, or a flat spring means using less of the elastic range. A simple coiled spring is just that, simple...and cheap.

    And here is one reason I love the 1911 so much (as opposed to the aesthetic qualities, which is the driving force for me) - a properly executed 1911 is designed around 1900 metallurgy. A properly built, modern 1911 should run forever and ever and ever, provided proper springs are maintained. This is why the 1911 and HiPower have that extra barrel locking lug, to prevent setback in the soft metal of the time.

    Information needed when ordering:
    1. Compressed length
    2. Outside diameter (measure with a caliper)
    3. Inside diameter (measure with a caliper)
    4. Constant ("weight" of the spring) - you decide what you want. I'd buy some new "normal" springs and find out what you want. Then order braided to match.

    For magazine springs, it's exactly the same. Or you can simply send them a spring and say "I want this, 10% stronger, and from braid."

  4. #4
    Site Supporter derekb's Avatar
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    blr, what sort of processes are used for manufacturing springs of this style? Would a wire CNC machine (of the sort that have lately started showing up being built by hobbyists) be appropriate? I haven't done much research into it, obviously, but it might be a neat tool to be able to crank out a new spring in a few seconds at home.
    I don't understand what's happening, but I have a soldering iron.

  5. #5
    Site Supporter BLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derekb View Post
    blr, what sort of processes are used for manufacturing springs of this style? Would a wire CNC machine (of the sort that have lately started showing up being built by hobbyists) be appropriate? I haven't done much research into it, obviously, but it might be a neat tool to be able to crank out a new spring in a few seconds at home.
    I would love to be an authority here, but I am not. This is a bit out of my depth, I'm sorry to say. I'm pretty sure (though not positive) springs are thermally processed again after winding (or whatever). I know that is frequently done to alleviate relaxation effects. Like I said though, I just know enough to get into trouble

    On making your own - I don't know. Though I'm the first to admit, if given the chance, I always prefer to "roll my own."

  6. #6
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    Do the braided springs last longer? I currently change the Wolff recoil/firing pin springs at around 3K rds in my Colt .45. Could this interval be extended with a quality braided spring of equal weight?

  7. #7
    Site Supporter BLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsa View Post
    Do the braided springs last longer? I currently change the Wolff recoil/firing pin springs at around 3K rds in my Colt .45. Could this interval be extended with a quality braided spring of equal weight?
    Life cycle is the primary reason for using the braided spring. They have a solid 10k life if properly done.

  8. #8
    We are diminished
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    I just shot them an email asking about estimated cost, minimum quantity, and what would be involved beyond sending them a mag and saying "make this work better."

  9. #9
    We are diminished
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    Keeping everyone abreast... The company no longer does branded springs.

    In the meantime, anyone know if the Metalform 10rd 9mm magazines take standard 1911 springs and if so what weight spring would be appropriate to try to increase tension? I'd really like to give them another try but they need tweaking to lock the slide back reliably.

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