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Thread: GP100 In Local IDPA Match

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by JonInWA View Post
    Other observations: As roundcount accumulated, concurrantly so did chamber GSR accumulate , occasionally necessitating thumbing down roloaded cartridges for full seating in the cylinder; the Safariland Comp III reloaders are a big help, but I still needed to thumb-seat cartridges in the cylinder occasionally after reloading.
    With my high round count GP100s, I make sure to take a 40 cal boresnake (if I'm running a 357) in my range bag. Usually mid-match, or at the end of day 1 if it's a two day match, I'll take the boresnake to the charge holes. If I'm running my 10mm GP, I use a 45 ACP boresnake for the same effect. This is in addition to brushing out under the extractor.
    I shot the PX4 before it was cool.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetfire View Post
    With my high round count GP100s, I make sure to take a 40 cal boresnake (if I'm running a 357) in my range bag. Usually mid-match, or at the end of day 1 if it's a two day match, I'll take the boresnake to the charge holes. If I'm running my 10mm GP, I use a 45 ACP boresnake for the same effect. This is in addition to brushing out under the extractor.

    How many rounds does your higher doing count GP 100 have through it?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewbie View Post
    How many rounds does your higher doing count GP 100 have through it?
    Not a lot, actually when I went back and looked at it. My 10mm GP100 Match Champion has 2494 rounds on it. The gun I used for 2012, 2013, and some of 2014 had 10,169 rounds on it, that was a standard 357 Mag 4 inch GP100. After that I switched to the fixed sight MC, then eventually to the adjustable sight MC guns. But I haven't really had a season where I put 5k on a gun since 2014 so it's harder to rack up those round counts.
    I shot the PX4 before it was cool.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by 03RN View Post
    I found that between the snug chambers in my M19 and my grimy reloads that I constantly had to press my reloads home. Not all of them but 1-2 each reload.

    Even with freshly brushed chambers Thats annoying.

    It definitely had me contemplating moon clips or different speed loaders.
    Some thoughts on that:
    1. Clean your brass.
    2. Run coated bullets in competition.
    3. Run your handloads through a Lee FCD (best thing you can do.)
    4. Make sure your brass is being sized as completely as possible.

    If anything, moon clips are going to be even more problematic with rounds that donít seat completely.

    I havenít shot IDPA in a while. I used to run a .40 cal snake through my chambers between stages.

  5. #15
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtcarm View Post
    Some thoughts on that:
    1. Clean your brass.
    2. Run coated bullets in competition.
    3. Run your handloads through a Lee FCD (best thing you can do.)
    4. Make sure your brass is being sized as completely as possible.

    If anything, moon clips are going to be even more problematic with rounds that donít seat completely.

    I havenít shot IDPA in a while. I used to run a .40 cal snake through my chambers between stages.
    I already use a FCD. I was getting my stuff ready for tomorrow and I was planning on using my M19 but now I think I may stick with my m66. It's a little loser.

    Honestly, I think cleaning my brass would be the most helpful.

    After 2-3 loadings it gets waxy black streaks from the lube I think. I need to find an easier way to clean loaded ammo than one at a time

  6. #16
    Member JonInWA's Avatar
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    As a follow-up to my recent discussion, last weekend I ran the GP100 in a 6 stage, approximately 100 round ASI match. The grips from VZ had arrived, and I decided to install the Black Twister G10 grip; Kevin at VZ explained than the concept behind the deep grooves was that they provided an area for the flesh of oneís hand to sink into, and to provide more gripping area.



    Given that I use full house 158 gr .357 Magnum cartridges, my thoughts were that anything that provides increased grippiness is a Major Good Thing, particularly in handling the torque inherent to the cartridge, so the Twister grips were first in the hopper, so to speak.
    Throughout the match, I used Federal American Eagle semi-jacketed 158 gr cartridges. The 11# Wolff hammer spring provided 100% ignition throughout the match, and there were no mechanical bobbles of any sort encountered throughout the day.
    The VZ grips are intriguing. Size-wise, theyíre midway between the Ruger full-size and compact grips (but much closer to the compacts).



    G10 is a fairly heavy material, but the heft is welcome in absorbing recoil forces. The grips are ingeniously designed, using an eccentric head (egg-shaped screw head) screw used to position the grips against the post of the GP100, and then screwed in, with the oblong portion of the screw head tightly abutting against the post frame interior for grip positioning, and then 2 steel pins are inserted in the right grip, which protrudes to mate with matching holes in the left grip to provide grip stability. It really is an ingenious and effective system, and nicely takes into account minor casting variations in the receiver mounting peg.









    The grips are beautifully manufactured and shaped; to me they somewhat resemble the wood grips Colt used as the OEM wood grip on the 4Ē Lawman Mk V during its brief production run. Fit and stability on the GP100 is excellent, and they really provide exemplary control.
    Bad news: Despite their shape and rounding, at about the 50 round point, I began to experience blistering on my inner thumb area as I did with the Ruger/Altamont Compact grips. At this point, I think itís simply a heavily recoiling .357 Magnum thing, as opposed to a gun/grip tang thing. I utilize a thumbs forward grip; I may try shifting to a thumbs high grip, or simply pre-bandage the thumb area afflicted before a match, or wear some appropriate gloves. Iíve heard that increasing strong hand grip pressure can be beneficial, but I donít think my grip is particularly wimpy to begin with, so thatís probably not necessary. In times of shortages of ammunition (particularly quality/decently priced .357 magnum cartridges, merely shooting sufficient amounts over time to build up a protective callous on my inner thumb area probably isnít going to happen, either.


    Impressed as I am with the VZ Twister, next in the grip analysis project will be with the VZ 320 G10 grips. The ones they provided to me per my request were the Black Cherry ones, which look stunning on the polished custom blue metal of the revolver.



    However, testing is somewhat on hold. After the match, I cleaned and lightly lubricated the revolver, but when I tried to dry-fire the next day, I encountered repetitive cylinder binding at least once in ever 1-2 cylinder triggerpull rotations. I removed the Wolff 11# spring and installed the new OEM stock Ruger hammer spring that Ruger had sent me earlier in the week, but continued to encounter the same issue.
    I then semi-detail disassembled the cylinder and crane assembly as before, and meticulously cleaned and de-lubricated. There was some significant GSR and sludge in the crane, cylinder, and cylinder ball bearing raceway which I removed, and lightly lubed the crane exterior and cylinder tunnel/bearing raceway with Dri Slide dry film lubricant/anticorrosive. I had also discovered what appears to be rust, apparently accumulating in the rear portion of the cylinder tunnel, and spreading to the crane shaft surfaces. Something inappropriate internally is going on, and Ruger Customer Service has provided me with an RMA and a FedEx shipping label, so itís off to the mother ship for a detailed analysis and fix. I simply should not have to perform a detailed disassembly and cleaning of the cylinder every 250 roundsÖ.
    So, what have I derived so far? One, shooting full-house .357 magnum is inherently somewhat painful and minor injury inducing after about the 50 round mark, and will probably beat on your hand and produce a blood blister regardless of grip choice.
    Two, I really like the VZ grips. There has to date been relatively little exposure and marketing of them, and they are somewhat pricey-especially compared to the Ruger available alternatives (of which I feel the Ruger or Altamont Compact option I far and away the best).




    G10 is a hard material, and will likely mar a stainless finish, or wear through a blued finish where the grip presses against the receiver. As these grips likely have become my permanent grip of choice, that doesnít bother me, as the wear only shows up when you remove the VZ grips and install nominally smaller grips. The VZ coverage area is a bit larger than that of the OEM grips, but an advantage of that is the hammer pivot pin is better and more securely enclosed by the grip. I find that the VZ grip does provide superb indexing and controllability (and they look great on the GP100. While my long-term testing is just beginning, at this point I have no issue with them, and strongly recommend them. They provide an excellent natural index and controllability in my experience and opinion.


    Showing marring wear marks where G10 abraids the metal from rubbing




    Meanwhile, hopefully Iíll have my GP100 fully examined and corrected by Ruger in reasonably short order (theyíre citing at least 2 to 4+ weeks); in the meantime, my revolver needs will be met by my 1978 vintage stainless Security Six with its modified Trausch grips-hardly a bad way to go.

    Best, Jon

  7. #17
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
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    Try grease where you're getting the wear. It might help prevent more and keep the rust at bay.

    I really like vzs as well but found my thumb would bleed as well with my smith's.

    So far the ahrends have not. Even with 200 rounds of magnums in a session.

  8. #18
    Site Supporter feudist's Avatar
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    @JonInWA

    Try Moleskin. Stickier than bandaids in awkward places and the smooth surface won't catch or bind.

    That Ruger is Beautiful with the cherry grips.

  9. #19
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    My first thought about the rust in the cylinder tunnel is active bluing salts remaining from the process used to create that beautiful bluing. I hope Ruger can solve the issue without destroying that gorgeous bluing. My second thought was a question about whether the rust is also the cause of the issues with the ISMI spring.

    In any event, awesome writeup.

  10. #20
    Ah, a fellow banana-thumb.

    Mine is just healed from a bout with my GP100 10mm with factory rubber. See my recent post for (hopefully) the solution.

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