Page 5 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 68

Thread: Fire Extinguishers - Preparing for a Valid Threat

  1. #41
    platform jumper CSW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Fairly rural 603.
    More expensive, but effective, are carbon dioxide extinguishers.

    I have dry chem, CO2 and a water in my home.
    "Don't worry about getting old. You'll still do stupid shit. Just slower."---BehindblueI's

  2. #42
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Guy View Post
    The powder is pretty obnoxious, and spreads surprisingly well on the breeze. I'd look for a more remote setting unless your back yard is pretty big.
    The powder is quite obnoxious. I had an extinguisher go off in the back of a '91 Caprice sheriff's car. What a mess. The worst part of it was it was another deputy's assigned vehicle while mine was in the shop.

  3. #43
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc_Glock View Post
    Thank you for the reminders and hard won education. Glad you and yours are safe.
    I couldn't have said it better. Thank the Lord that the OP and his wife are safe.
    Last edited by deputyG23; 09-16-2021 at 07:25 AM.

  4. #44
    Site Supporter Coyotesfan97's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Phoenix Metro, AZ
    Quote Originally Posted by deputyG23 View Post
    The powder is quite obnoxious. I had an extinguisher go off in the back of a '91 Caprice sheriff's car. What a mess. The worst part of it was it was another deputy's assigned vehicle while mine was in the shop.
    Iíve had to deal with that mess a couple times. The powder goes everywhere.

    At least thereís no odor like cleaning the aftermath of a dogís explosive diarrhea out of his car kennel.
    The bravest are surely those who have the clearest vision of what is before them, glory and danger alike, and yet notwithstanding, go out to meet it.* Thucydides 471BC

    "Hey! Let's be careful out there." Sgt Phil Esterhaus played by Michael Conrad

  5. #45
    Glad you are ok and thanks for sharing.

    I drove a VW Beetle for a few years and always had a fire extinguisher mounted in the cabin. These days, not so much. That needs to change, especially when pulling the travel trailer where the extinguisher is in the trailer.

    I am going to buy a bigger extinguisher for the truck and looked at these fancy new "sticks" a while ago. Anyone have info on them?

    https://www.amazon.com/Augusta-Motor...14336694&psc=1

    They are very expensive but I can stash one in the wifes car without much fuss. There is a smaller 50 and I linked to the larger 100 above.

    Also a good reminder to check the bottle in the house and talk about the fire escape plan (which we do because of my cub scout yearly).

    At my previous job we had a safety day in January. I got to slide down the emergency slide of a commercial airliner (your ass gets hot) and extinguish a fire they made in a big metal tray type thing. Good times!

  6. #46
    Thanks for posting this. Sorry for your loss. I went to Amazon and ordered more fire extinguishers because I realized we didn't have any in the garage. Any recommendations from the experts?

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by BN View Post
    Thanks for posting this. Sorry for your loss. I went to Amazon and ordered more fire extinguishers because I realized we didn't have any in the garage. Any recommendations from the experts?
    I saved this post from another fire related thread a few years ago. Hopefully any experts can add any relevant information that may be missing.

    https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....l=1#post587821

    I'd recommend at a minimum a 2a10bc extinguisher. That's what's required for all commercial buildings. Most people have the tiny 1a5bc extinguishers and they aren't going to put out much fire.

    What do the numbers and letters mean? 2a means it's the equivalent to 2 gallons of water. The letters are for different types of fires. The main four types are A,B,,C and K. There's also a class D but you're not going to need it in your house. 10bc means it can put out a fire of ten square feet of class b&c type fires.

    You don't want to use an extinguisher that's made for the type of fire. It's not a one size fits all solution.

    One of the most common misconceptions that we see are people throwing powder and stuff on the fire. The biggest being flour. A few weeks ago we had a grease fire and the lady threw a bunch of flour on it and it flashed and caused burns to her back.

    What we recommend for people with and without extinguishers is keeping a cookie sheet or baking pan that's bigger than the pan on the counter anytime your cooking. If it flashes or gets out of control you just slide the sheet over the pan and it smothers the fire.

    I can say that people have no freakin idea what to do when the moment happens. The extinguisher is 3 feet away and instead they grab a cup of water or flour. They'll try and grab the pan to take it outside and spill it catching their living room on fire.

    Kitchens are far and away the #1 cause of house fires.

  8. #48
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Lexington, SC
    My daughter had a similar fire last year while cooking on the stove. I forget what she was making but something flammable (grease or oil) sloshed over the side of the pan and flashed. Thankfully I was sitting at my desk nearby and she called my name as she was grabbing a bag of sugar (instead of baking soda) to try and smother it with. She knew enough to make a problem a disaster. I picked up the lid sitting next to the pan on the stovetop and covered it in turn putting out the fire.

    I got an "Oh", from her in response.

    There was an extinguisher three feet away under the sink, but honestly I'm glad she didn't think to use it as I wouldn't want to clean it up if avoidable.

  9. #49
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Lexington, SC
    Speaking of cleaning up extinguisher messes, when I was in college I managed a restaurant.

    The kitchen automatic fire suppression system had to be inspected and serviced annually. On one such occasion the tech doing the work made some type of mistake when servicing the links in the system and about an hour after he left the thing deployed on its own.

    It released the contents of what I recall being two approximately 10 gal wall mounted tanks. The powder sprayed from the hood mounted nozzles all over the grills, fryers, floors, counters, etc.

    I think we were closed close to two days cleaning up.

  10. #50
    Does Not Work For You TGS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Back in northern Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by rayrevolver View Post
    I am going to buy a bigger extinguisher for the truck and looked at these fancy new "sticks" a while ago. Anyone have info on them?
    @RevolverRob mentioned this upthread. After doing some research, I would treat these as a last ditch product or for when you can't fit a regular fire extinguisher. I think it would go well in my Porsche, or Rob's Vespa, given space constraints for their use as everyday vehicles. If my Porsche were strictly a track car, or I were buying for a regular sized vehicle, I'd go with a regular extinguisher.

    I think of it as the J-frame or Glock 43 of fire extinguishers. Don't rely on it when you can rely on a service pistol.....or in this case, a real fire extinguisher.

    It works but it's pretty weak and requires you to get very close to the fire to be effective if you're anywhere outdoors where you typically have a 5mph wind (so slow that it's actually not usually felt). If there's any sort of wind that you can actually feel and think "Oh, it's windy", I imagine this product would be completely useless.

    There's a curious use for it indoors though. I wonder if Dan had two of these, if he could've thrown them into the trailer like grenades then closed the trailer. Given it'd be a relatively small, enclosed volume of space, I wonder if the sticks may have killed the flames or at least prevented it from spreading inside.

    There's a bunch of video demonstrations of varying quality; a bunch of people using them on very well contained "fires" in their grills where there's no wind, or use on very light fires that are already going out themselves. So, be critical of any videos you watch. This is the only demonstration I found of the sticks being used on a robust fire (not already going out on its own) in open air with a slight breeze......I'd estimate 3-5mph, so light you'd barely even be able to feel it. This shows how close you have to get for it to actually be effective in such realistic yet undemanding conditions.

    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •