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Thread: COVID 19: Violence; Threats; Criminal Activity

  1. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Borderland View Post
    The nearest hospital for us is 45 minutes away. A local clinic a few miles away closed last summer for a year due to staffing issues. I think they reopened with fewer services. The next nearest clinic is 14 miles away. This upsets my wife as we're both in our early 70's. It's not a yuge deal for me because everything is a trade off. Living in a city has it's downside also. I've lived in cities about half of my life so I have a good barometer. I suppose a person can retire and spend their time worried about their next heart attack and how long it will take to get to a hospital but that has never concerned me.
    Good for you for thinking about those issues. A lot of folks moving to rural areas don’t. The small town I used to live in had an all-volunteer EMS squad(whoever was in town and got the tone showed up)and used a regional ambulance, and new folks were often not happy about the response and transport times.

    If you know you’ll be waiting for help, you can plan for that. Basic first aid skills & supplies, CPR, anything needed to manage existing conditions, etc. You can also think about accident prevention — as we age, simple slip/trip & fall accidents have more serious consequences.

    Things that helped us respond to calls:
    -Someone staying on the phone with Dispatch/911
    -House numbers easily visible at night from a vehicle
    -Outside lighting
    -A clear path to bring a stretcher into the house
    -Current medication lists for each resident
    - Someone to provide a relevant medical history
    - A plan for what level of care is wanted, up to DNR if appropriate

  2. #62
    Site Supporter RoyGBiv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterb View Post
    Good for you for thinking about those issues. A lot of folks moving to rural areas don’t. The small town I used to live in had an all-volunteer EMS squad(whoever was in town and got the tone showed up)and used a regional ambulance, and new folks were often not happy about the response and transport times.

    If you know you’ll be waiting for help, you can plan for that. Basic first aid skills & supplies, CPR, anything needed to manage existing conditions, etc. You can also think about accident prevention — as we age, simple slip/trip & fall accidents have more serious consequences.

    Things that helped us respond to calls:
    -Someone staying on the phone with Dispatch/911
    -House numbers easily visible at night from a vehicle
    -Outside lighting
    -A clear path to bring a stretcher into the house
    -Current medication lists for each resident
    - Someone to provide a relevant medical history
    - A plan for what level of care is wanted, up to DNR if appropriate
    Excellent advice for City-dwellers also.
    "No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms." - Thomas Jefferson, Virginia Constitution, Draft 1, 1776

  3. #63
    one foot in the gulag... blues's Avatar
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    I agree and sympathize with you guys...but I always come back to the line by "Charlie Waite" from "Open Range":

    Well, you may not know this, but there's things that gnaw at a man worse than dying.
    Somewhere there's a happy medium. I'd like to think that's where I live. Who knows?
    There's nothing civil about this war

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    https://www.thedenverchannel.com/new...y-harass-staff

    The executive director of Jefferson County Public Health, Dr. Dawn Comstock, had to shut down several of mobile vaccine clinics after one driver ran over their sign, others screamed profanities at the vaccine staff and one driver even threw water on a nurse.
    "We've had someone throw live fireworks. We've had someone drive up onto a curb toward a vaccination staff member," Comstock said.
    People gonna people.

    Must be those folks who just don't want dissenting opinions about the coronavirus to be silenced and dammit all they want is open, genuine communication.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  5. #65
    Member JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 45dotACP View Post
    People gonna people.

    Must be those folks who just don't want dissenting opinions about the coronavirus to be silenced and dammit all they want is open, genuine communication.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
    Like dissenting opinions on rebuilding an automatic transmission? Dissenting opinions of the ignorant?

    How about dissenting opinions about how a DPMS = a BCM or Noveske.
    As a man sows, so shall he reap.

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    Like dissenting opinions on rebuilding an automatic transmission? Dissenting opinions of the ignorant?

    How about dissenting opinions about how a DPMS = a BCM or Noveske.
    I'd trust them.

    Like I told my cardiologist, I have a heart too, so I'm perfectly qualified to tell you how to treat heart disease.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  7. #67
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    I know this is a wall of text but it’s worth the read.

    https://www.expressnews.com/news/art...SAEN_210Report

    Texas doctors experience increased hostility amid ivermectin, COVID misinformation

    Dr. Josh Septimus can feel the tension.

    Septimus, a Houston Methodist primary care physician who oversees all six of the hospital’s same-day clinics, said some COVID patients become angry when his staff refuses to treat them with ivermectin. The medication is only approved for certain parasitic infections, such as river blindness or scabies, but not the virus.

    Patients are flooding his clinics with requests for the drug, he said, leading to hostility toward physicians assistants and nurse practitioners who by policy cannot prescribe it.


    “We have had patients threatening us if we decline to prescribe ivermectin,” he said. “There are people who have just completely lost faith in mainstream medicine. And in those communities, there’s anger at the public health establishment.”

    Ivermectin is at the center of the latest craze over unproven COVID treatments that so far do not show any meaningful benefits for patients battling the virus. Researchers are still studying whether the drug can help COVID patients in the future. But right now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warn against using it, citing the risk of severe side effects.

    Outpatient ivermectin prescriptions have soared since mid-July, with a simultaneous increase in calls to poison control centers about ivermectin exposure, according to the CDC. Some people who ingested the drug reported serious damage to their nervous system.

    Ivermectin has “become part of the canon of anti-science disinformation that we’re seeing from the political right,” said Dr. Peter Hotez, dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. “There is no strong evidence that it works either as a treatment or preventative measure for COVID.”

    Dr. Faisal Masud, the medical director for critical care at Houston Methodist, said families have been demanding the drug for their loved ones fighting COVID in the ICU. Before the drug became popular, demands for specific medications were "very rare," he said.

    That is baffling and it’s disappointing,” he said. “It creates a rift between the medical team and the family. And you don’t want that. You want everybody on the same page.”

    The desire for ivermectin led one family last week to file a lawsuit against Memorial Hermann. A 74-year-old man, described as the backbone of his family, obtained a prescription for the drug at Houston’s VA Medical Center following a positive COVID test, a family member said. He was later admitted to Memorial Hermann Sugar Land.

    A Fort Bend County judge on Sept. 3 issued a court order to force the hospital to administer the drug, but doctors refused, the family said. The man died three days later. The VA said it is reviewing the case but could not comment on the prescription. Memorial Hermann could not comment on specifics of the case.

    Experts point to multiple factors that trigger people’s desire to resort to drugs like ivermectin. The increased reliance on the internet in lieu of medical doctors is one issue, said Dr. Eric Storch, professor and vice chair of psychology in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine.

    The level of political divisiveness also plays a role, he said.

    High-profile conservative media figures such as Laura Ingraham and Tucker Carlson have touted the drug as a possible COVID treatment. Well-known podcaster Joe Rogan, who attracts a massive audience, recently said he used ivermectin with a number of steroids to treat COVID.

    Masud said some COVID patient family members refer to celebrities they see using it. But they “are demanding something that no reasonable doctor would ever be comfortable prescribing,” he said.

    That creates a trust issue between doctors and patients at a time when that connection is paramount, he said. Families cannot see their loved ones who have COVID and therefore must rely more heavily on the doctor’s decisions, he said.

    What starts as skepticism evolves into paranoia. Then it turns into aggression.

    “The verbal, the psychological, and in some cases physical threats is unprecedented,” Masud said. “And you need to remember that all of my doctors — including the physical therapists, respiratory therapists — are exhausted.”

    Septimus said the patients in his primary care practice do not display the level of hostility as patients in same-day clinics, where doctors often see people for the first time.
    Experts say some ivermectin advocates misunderstand early lab studies that showed some benefits against COVID. More recent, comprehensive tests on humans have not been promising.

    There is a ton of stuff you can put in a test tube with the virus that inhibits viral growth,” said Dr. James McDeavitt, executive vice president and dean of clinical affairs at Baylor College of Medicine.

    McDeavitt and other researchers acknowledge that further study of ivermectin is warranted. But Masud and Septimus view the level of misinformation as an urgent problem.
    Last edited by HCM; 09-10-2021 at 06:38 PM.

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    The desire for ivermectin led one family last week to file a lawsuit against Memorial Hermann. A 74-year-old man, described as the backbone of his family, obtained a prescription for the drug at Houston’s VA Medical Center following a positive COVID test, a family member said. He was later admitted to Memorial Hermann Sugar Land.

    A Fort Bend County judge on Sept. 3 issued a court order to force the hospital to administer the drug, but doctors refused, the family said. The man died three days later. The VA said it is reviewing the case but could not comment on the prescription. Memorial Hermann could not comment on specifics of the case.
    Not the first time that's happened...
    ----------------------------------------
    A judge in Ohio has reversed an earlier emergency order that required a hospital to administer ivermectin to a COVID-19 patient against the hospital's wishes. The anti-parasitic drug is most commonly used in the U.S. as a dewormer in animals.

    A previous ruling by a different judge had ordered the hospital, West Chester Hospital near Cincinnati, to administer the drug to a patient after his wife brought suit over the hospital's refusal to administer a prescription written by an outside doctor.

    "After considering all of the evidence presented in this case, there can be no doubt that the medical and scientific communities do not support the use of ivermectin as a treatment for COVID-19," Judge Michael A. Oster wrote in the new ruling, issued Monday.

    At the center of the lawsuit affected by Monday's order is Jeffrey Smith, who tested positive for the coronavirus in July, court records say.

    After Smith was admitted to West Chester Hospital, his condition deteriorated steadily. In mid-July, he was transferred to the intensive care unit. On Aug. 1, he was placed on a ventilator. By Aug. 20, doctors put him in a medically induced coma.

    His wife, Julie Smith, contacted Dr. Fred Wagshul, affiliated with the Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance, which has lobbied for the use of ivermectin in COVID-19 patients. He is not board certified within any specialty and has not worked at a hospital in 10 years, according to his own testimony.

    Wagshul provided a prescription for ivermectin, doing so without having seen Smith and despite lacking medical privileges at West Chester Hospital, court records say.

    The hospital refused to administer the drug, saying it would interfere with other medications.

    When Julie Smith filed suit, a different judge granted an emergency injunction on Aug. 23 that ordered West Chester Hospital to begin administering 30 milligrams daily for 21 days. The Smiths' attorney say that Jeffrey Smith's condition has since improved.

    But in another hearing last week, doctors from West Chester Hospital told the court that ivermectin had not helped their patient. Wagshul, testifying on behalf of the Smiths, did not convince the judge otherwise.

    "Plaintiff's own witness ... testified that 'I honestly don't know' if continued use of ivermectin will benefit Jeff Smith," Oster wrote in the ruling.

    "While this court is sympathetic to the Plaintiff and understands the idea of wanting to do anything to help her loved one, public policy should not and does not support allowing a physician to try 'any' type of treatment on human beings," the judge wrote.

    https://www.npr.org/2021/09/07/10349...al-order-judge

  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    I know this is a wall of text but it’s worth the read.

    https://www.expressnews.com/news/art...SAEN_210Report

    Texas doctors experience increased hostility amid ivermectin, COVID misinformation
    BUT JOE ROGAN!!!!!!

    WHY CAN'T WE HAVE A CIVIL DEBATE ABOUT THIS, STOP SHUTTING ME DOWN!!!!

    /sarc
    Gaming will get you killed in the streets. Dueling will get you killed in the fields.
    -Alexander Hamilton

  10. #70
    Site Supporter Totem Polar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    I know this is a wall of text but it’s worth the read.

    Texas doctors experience increased hostility amid ivermectin, COVID misinformation
    Judas Fucking Priest. I’m convinced that the jungian theory that there are periods of mass mental illness across whole cultures and societies may have some merit.

    I’m not even against using worm parasite shit or similar to cure yourself… but expecting mainstream SMEs to conform to your worldview is… narcissistic.
    ”PF shines like a diamond in the goat's ass of the Internet.”
    -BBI

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