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Thread: Let's talk about Gi vs. No-Gi

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Totem Polar View Post
    @Cecil Burch has written on this topic at reasonable length. He absolutely convinced on the value of Gi vs no-gi for real world defense. I see the gi as a durable substitute for the sweatshirts, jean jackets and leather coats that we all wear in the PNW. As I am typing this, I’m in a coffeeshop, and I don’t see anyone not wearing something that could be used to cross-collar choke them (Stop! Creeper time…). That said, I have the least competition mindset of any BJJ player around. I practice no gi because I enjoy it more, and I injure myself less. Plus, it’s still better than “crane beak hand and a sharp word,” if that makes sense. I’m with you all the way on the universality of no-gi, if not the sophistication.

    Seriously though, I will absolutely defer to Cecil’s expertise on this one. The debate is pretty much right in his wheelhouse.

    I still like no-gi though.
    And I am not going to be one to argue with an expert like Mr. Burch. I am planning on going to one of his upcoming workshops on real world self defense, which BTW, is done in street clothes, so basically Nogi. But as a beginner, I am trying to develop capability from the ground up (pun intended) and from my humble perspective, I get more out of Nogi and I enjoy it more, so I will do it more. I may get back into Gi at some point, but that is where I'm at now.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    And I am not going to be one to argue with an expert like Mr. Burch. I am planning on going to one of his upcoming workshops on real world self defense, which BTW, is done in street clothes, so basically Nogi. But as a beginner, I am trying to develop capability from the ground up (pun intended) and from my humble perspective, I get more out of Nogi and I enjoy it more, so I will do it more. I may get back into Gi at some point, but that is where I'm at now.
    Street clothes are closer to wearing a gi than the rashguard and board shorts most people do no-gi in. Enjoying no-gi more is reason enough to do it, at least you are rolling regularly.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Flamingo View Post
    Street clothes are closer to wearing a gi than the rashguard and board shorts most people do no-gi in. Enjoying no-gi more is reason enough to do it, at least you are rolling regularly.
    So should I bring multiple T-shirts because they are all going to get ripped up?

  4. #34
    IMO gi vs no gi is irrelevant if your primary reason for training is self defense. Learning the fundamentals of positional dominance, escapes, reversals/sweeps, etc. is basically the same as applied to self defense.

    What I learned from being a long time Shivworks acolyte is that there is still a ~10% modification to your bjj technique/strategy required to apply it to a weapons based environment. Learning to make those changes, such as focusing on hand/arm control, requires additional work on top of your standard mat time regardless of your attire.

    Train what you enjoy. I personally train both but spend 75% of my mat time in a gi. For self defense train grappling, preferably bjj, and put in the work to learn to apply it to the “weapons based” environment of the real world.

  5. #35
    Site Supporter Totem Polar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmf552 View Post
    So should I bring multiple T-shirts because they are all going to get ripped up?
    Cecil will have both plenty of T-shirts, and an answer.


    On the topic of his weekend seminars, I’ve done 3 full courses with him (and @Flamingo, conveniently), plus change, and I intend on training with Cecil and the crew some more. I recommend his IAJJ course unreservedly.

    I also think that @EPF nailed it, above—with the caveat that I’m no expert. My sense thus far is that just getting any mat time at all, and then grabbing a seminar with any of the Shivworks crew to custom-tune that prior work will yield the quickest functional results for a pure “American streets” defensive skill set. I can say that the limited regular rolling that I’ve done has allowed me to better absorb concepts from Cecil’s seminar and, conversely, those seminars sure helped sort out the miasma of arms, legs, and techniques that is the first year of BJJ for everyone. Regular work, with periodic specialized fine-tuning is a damn fine recipe for progress. JMO.
    ”PF shines like a diamond in the goat's ass of the Internet.”
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