Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: AAR Ernest Langdon's 3 Day Advanced Tactical Pistol Skills

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSky View Post
    I am the fellow referred to above who said he was 80. And I am eighty years of age. In my now long life I am sure I have completed at least 50 2 or 3 days classes and have always been safe, to the extreme, and a good marksman. I have never been "that guy" and it pains me that I have finally done it. Fatigue, both mental and physical, accumulated. As described above. I am embarrassed and apologetic. Know your limits. Maybe I should have self-screened but I had just made the switch to TDA and really wanted a class with Ernest. I went beyond my limits which have changed over the past couple of years.

    About the class - In my youth I read the World Book encyclopedia just for the joy of it. This class was that as pertains to pistolcraft. Out of a firehose. Communicated in detail and always including the "why". Go there if you can.

    Apologies for being a burden.
    I'll train with you anytime.

    And if by "that guy" you mean the guy we all want to emulate and model our resilience and performance after, then yeah, you're "that guy".

    Much respect.

  2. #12
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    The Morgue
    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSky View Post
    I am the fellow referred to above who said he was 80. And I am eighty years of age. In my now long life I am sure I have completed at least 50 2 or 3 days classes and have always been safe, to the extreme, and a good marksman. I have never been "that guy" and it pains me that I have finally done it. Fatigue, both mental and physical, accumulated. As described above. I am embarrassed and apologetic. Know your limits. Maybe I should have self-screened but I had just made the switch to TDA and really wanted a class with Ernest. I went beyond my limits which have changed over the past couple of years.
    Good classes always seem to push me to the edge of my mental capacity. When learning at an accelerated pace, it's easy to get mentally fatigued. Add in the heat, and physical fatigue is almost a guarantee. Especially for those of us who aren't out in it everyday.

    I've been on that range when I was half your age, and I was very, very near the same place you got to. It sneaks up on you. But you understood what happened, and I bet it won't happen again.

    I hope I'm out training when I am 80.

  3. #13
    Site Supporter Kanye Wyoming's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Northwestern SE PA
    This is one of the best threads ever. A detailed and well done AAR. The OPís kind description of and gentle approach on the line towards the 80-year-old gentleman who was otherwise squared away but faltering in the afternoon heat on TD3. The 80-year-old gentleman announcing himself, expressing regret and taking full responsibility. The kind, understanding and encouraging responses to him.

    The best part: an 80-year-old pushing himself because at 80, he had just switched to TDA and wanted the best TDA instruction out there.

    May we all live to (at least) 80 and upon reaching that milestone may we all be of mind to undertake and conquer new challenges.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Kanye Wyoming View Post
    This is one of the best threads ever. A detailed and well done AAR. The OPís kind description of and gentle approach on the line towards the 80-year-old gentleman who was otherwise squared away but faltering in the afternoon heat on TD3. The 80-year-old gentleman announcing himself, expressing regret and taking full responsibility. The kind, understanding and encouraging responses to him.

    The best part: an 80-year-old pushing himself because at 80, he had just switched to TDA and wanted the best TDA instruction out there.

    May we all live to (at least) 80 and upon reaching that milestone may we all be of mind to undertake and conquer new challenges.
    Amen

  5. #15
    Well, I'll have to say I wimped out of the course (with advance notice so the spot could be filled). Had minor weak hand thumb surgery which wasn't quite healed, and hindered grip/indexing. And some low grade strong-side shoulder pain, which wasn't awful but flared occasionally, and probably/maybe wouldn't have given me issues. However, at appt with ortho surgeon last week, he decided to order an MRI. Got that done Tuesday, and results same day. He wondered why I wasn't experiencing pain with higher round counts at range ('cause I was mostly shooting my .22). And now I'm scheduled for rotator cuff surgery. So as a youngster at 71, I'm not in the toughness league of @BlueSky. Hat's off.

    Having attended Ernest's "regular" class, I was looking forward to the advanced class. And told Ernest I'd sign up next year. I've attended several training courses, and have to say Ernest is perhaps the best I've seen for being engaged and enthusiastic, and communicating information. And best as I recall, his sub-5 sec demo of the F.A.S.T. was so smooth that he made it look pretty simple (yeah, uh-huh, sure). No one in that class got a coin.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by LangdonTactical View Post
    Thank you for the kind words, I am not sure I deserve them.

    To be honest, I am personally not happy with how the class went. I normally give a lot more personal coaching in my classes and you deserved to get more time from me. The bad news is that you were shooting well and handling your gun safely. As you stated, we had some issues in the class. There were at least 4 if not 5 guys in the class that should not have been there. They were in way over their heads and needed to be watched constantly. One of them had to be removed for a safety violation on the morning of the second day. I had to spend almost all my time down around those guys watching their every move. It was exhausting and unfair for the rest of the class.
    I am trying to come up with a plan for how to deal with this issue. I am not sure why people think they are ready for an "Advanced" shooting class when they don't even have a full grasp of the fundamentals of marksmanship?

    I have had several classes where we had "that guy" that needed extra attention, but this time I had a bunch of them.

    Please understand that a lot of my comments were not directed at you, but at others on the line that needed to hear that.

    It was a very frustrating weekend for me and I am going to try to figure out how to do a better job of screening people that come to my class.

    Thanks again for the review and for being a student that I did not need to watch for three daysstraight!

    Ernest


    This may not be practical, but it is an idea for screening. Decide on what skills are most critical to you in terms of safety and gun handling, and have students send you a short video of themselves doing it dryfire. For example, show me: 1) three draws from the holster, and reholster. 2) three administrative reloads, 3) three slide lock reloads, 4) three clearing pistol, 5) three dryfire from low ready, high ready. etc. The video would not be a mandatory requirement for attendance but you would glean valuable information from the submitted clips. The students that submit videos would be more motivated, give you a baseline assessment, and possibly be less of a concern (or more concerning depending on what you see!). The students that did not submit videos would be identified for closer monitoring in the beginning. The downside is that someone would have to watch the videos and it is more of your time. There are logistical issues of video submission, but I think most people these days would be capable of overcoming the IT hurdles.

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •