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Thread: “Elite” Mexican cartel team, NOT a 5.11 commercial!

  1. #11
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    Just got done reading an article about police being killed, tortured, and forced to flee their homes in Guanajuato. There is massive corruption in Mexico, but there are good cops who fight evil.


    We have it so damn good in the USA we have not a clue.


    Hopefully I’ll get to talk to a Mexican cop while I’m done here, but not sure I’ll get the chance.

  2. #12
    This stuff is absolutely terrifying. The fact that the majority of the population has no idea is appalling. Thanks main stream media ie Communist scum sucking bastards.
    I'll wager you a PF dollar™ 😎
    What is Woke? Thats malicious bullying shrouded in virtue.

  3. #13
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    The military members I’ve seen, look professional. Especially the Marines.


    The police, not so much. In the past, when the Policia Federal existed, they did look professional. Their uniforms looked like a quality Mexican take on the American police uniform. The way they carried their gear looked professional too.


    Now that they have been replaced by the Guarda Nacional, a uniform change has happened. The camo uniform looks horrible and the “police uniform” looks like something from Spain or Portugal. Looks out of place.



    Just some observations from what I’ve seen.

  4. #14
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnO View Post
    One look at that and it becomes obvious that the administration’s claim of climate change is undeniable.
    Splendidly played.
    #RESIST

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheNewbie View Post
    Just got done reading an article about police being killed, tortured, and forced to flee their homes in Guanajuato. There is massive corruption in Mexico, but there are good cops who fight evil.
    Not to rain on your parade (funeral procession?), but it takes a lot more evidence than him/her being killed by a cartel to reasonably conclude that a Mexican cop isn’t dirty. The cartels kill each other’s employees quite often, and a lot of those employees are cops.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Français View Post
    Not to rain on your parade (funeral procession?), but it takes a lot more evidence than him/her being killed by a cartel to reasonably conclude that a Mexican cop isn’t dirty. The cartels kill each other’s employees quite often, and a lot of those employees are cops.

    You’re not raining on my parade. I simply made a statement that despite the massive corruption in Mexico, there are cops trying to do good work. It’s unlikely all 240+ cops killed in Guanajuato over the last three years were corrupt associates of the cartel. Some? Yes. Most? Wouldn’t surprise me. All? Unlikely.


    The good Mexican cops having a real challenge, and many obstacles that limit their ability to do good work.

  7. #17
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    IMHO-A fundamental problem with Civil Mexican Law Enforcement is that almost inevitably they are faced with the "Plata o Plomo" (Silver or Lead) Proposition. As such, virtually all of the Civil Mexican Police Organizations have a level of corruption that makes those organizations fundamentally untrustworthy. Individual officials can and do perform righteous deeds and/or form cooperative relationships with their US counterparts and good work can get done. This is on a very case by case, person to person basis.

    Arguably, the only entity in Mexico that has escaped this endemic corruption has been their Marines. I have been told that great pains are taken to recruit and retain an officer corp that is as affluent as possible to mitigate the risk of financial compromise.
    I have been told that their physical standards for both enlisted and officers is exacting and enforced. I am told that they train with their international counterparts far more frequently in far more meaningful ways than their Mexican Army counterparts.

    The Mexican Marines happen to often poll as the most trustworthy entity in Mexico.

    I base the opinions expressed on significant person reading, conversations with family members who live in Mexico, multiple discussions with US and Mexican Academics and multiple discussions with US Federal Law Enforcement Officials who work/have worked in Mexico. Additionally, I base my opinions on my efforts, both successful and unsuccessful, to locate and apprehend fugitives in Mexico as the result of charges leveled against them here in the US in the violent crime, narcotics, failure to register a a sex offender and child exploitation contexts.

    I would be keenly interested in the basis of consistent or contrary opinions.
    I am not your attorney. I am not giving legal advice. Any and all opinions expressed are personal and my own and are not those of any employer-past, present or future.

  8. #18
    Powder Potentate Borderland's Avatar
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    There were people who were arrested in the Seattle area with ties to a cartel last year.

    https://www.dea.gov/press-releases/2...ing-conspiracy

    No doubt they're in every major city in the US.
    In the P-F basket of deplorables.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by vcdgrips View Post
    IMHO-A fundamental problem with Civil Mexican Law Enforcement is that almost inevitably they are faced with the "Plata o Plomo" (Silver or Lead) Proposition. As such, virtually all of the Civil Mexican Police Organizations have a level of corruption that makes those organizations fundamentally untrustworthy. Individual officials can and do perform righteous deeds and/or form cooperative relationships with their US counterparts and good work can get done. This is on a very case by case, person to person basis.

    Arguably, the only entity in Mexico that has escaped this endemic corruption has been their Marines. I have been told that great pains are taken to recruit and retain an officer corp that is as affluent as possible to mitigate the risk of financial compromise.
    I have been told that their physical standards for both enlisted and officers is exacting and enforced. I am told that they train with their international counterparts far more frequently in far more meaningful ways than their Mexican Army counterparts.

    The Mexican Marines happen to often poll as the most trustworthy entity in Mexico.

    I base the opinions expressed on significant person reading, conversations with family members who live in Mexico, multiple discussions with US and Mexican Academics and multiple discussions with US Federal Law Enforcement Officials who work/have worked in Mexico. Additionally, I base my opinions on my efforts, both successful and unsuccessful, to locate and apprehend fugitives in Mexico as the result of charges leveled against them here in the US in the violent crime, narcotics, failure to register a a sex offender and child exploitation contexts.

    I would be keenly interested in the basis of consistent or contrary opinions.


    I think this fairly accurate. It’s my understanding as well.


    From reading and researching the issue and talking to people in Mexico. I don’t not have your experience on the legal side, but I would assume that only reinforces the other information.


    I was told that the Policia Estatel de Estado de Mexico are pretty bad. My one experience with something close to police corruption in Mexico was by a member if they police force, who spoke excellent, almost unaccented, English.

  10. #20
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    Fixing the military and police forces in Mexico would help greatly to improve life, but they are a symptom of a problem, not the cause. It’s a symptom that makes everything worse, but the causes is much deeper and culturally rooted.


    My brother in law got lucky, he drew the right color ball at the “draft lottery” and didn’t have to serve. My wife’s uncle, who is now a priest, did one year in the Mexican army in the 80s. He said it was a good experience, but that was a different time and he didn’t have to fight.

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