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Thread: Trigger weight for “fighting revolver?”

  1. #1

    Trigger weight for “fighting revolver?”

    Hello, I would love some opinions on where people personally like their revolver trigger weight for carry.

    And also if pocket versus holster carry affect that decision making for you?

    My LCR trigger is heavy but still lighter than a J frame trigger. I was thinking of doing the 9# apex for the SW rather than the 6# mcarbo. For semi-autos I personally usually hover around a 4.5-5.5# for carry gun trigger weight, but have 8# DA pulls on some guns.

    Thanks in advance!

    @Clusterfrack
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  2. #2
    Actual preference of weight is going to be subjective, but what is imperative is reliable ignition.

    I recently obtained 650 rounds of Winchester 130gr jacked .38sp ammo. Neither of my two most oft used revolvers will reliably ignite it, and I lost a shoot off due to a light strike in my 586 using S&B ammo as it was all that was available. I've have no issue with Freedom Munitions or Federal ammo.

    I've only fired one cylinder full of ammo through an LCR and am unable to offer any information regarding that option.
    I had an ER nurse in a class. I noticed she kept taking all head shots. Her response when asked why, "'I've seen too many people who have been shot in the chest putting up a fight in the ER." Point taken.

  3. #3
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
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    Most of my k frames are 10/5 lbs but my m66-8 is 8/4 lbs. Ive only smoothed the insides. Ive never had an issue with light strikes, except for trying wolf magnum srp.

    I dont mind heavier triggers as long as there no weird hitches.

  4. #4
    Lives to Enable Revolvers Stephanie B's Avatar
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    @Mas may have an opinion on this. My recollection is that reducing the weight of a trigger below that of factory specs in a self-defense revolver is not a great idea.
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  5. #5
    Member Trooper224's Avatar
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    Weight doesn't matter nearly as much as smoothness of pull. Most of my S&W revolvers have glassy factory triggers around 10-12 pounds, on average. This doesn't effect performance. A couple of my Colts are lighter, but the trigger stacks like a bitch and that's a bigger impediment to good DA shooting than pull weight.
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  6. #6
    For what it's worth, In DA, I generally find a smooth and consistent trigger pull is more important than a light weight. If you haven't already I'd work on smoothness either by extensive dry fire or via gunsmith or personal work on the action if you have the skills to not mess it up. Our pre-15 combat masterpiece for instance is a heavier pull than many of our other revolvers but is dead on the smoothest and runs well because of it. Never a concern whether it will pop primers reliably on any given ammunition like there might be with a lightened trigger.

    ETA: typing at the same time as Trooper224 apparently :-)

  7. #7
    happy sharps enabler Totem Polar's Avatar
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    At this point, I prefer DAO, smooth, and as light as possible with complete reliability. In 2021, there’s no reason to be putting up with heavy triggers when several factory guns are coming off the shelf with pull weights under 10lbs.

    I like 8.5-10.5lbs, myself. I had a C&S tuned model 10 that was in the 7lb range, but it wouldn’t light the stiffer stuff (eg. Magtech) off. 8.5 and any ammo is a pretty good benchmark goal.

    I’m amazed at some of the pull weights that Caleb gets on his revolvers. Sub-7 is a bridge to far for me, personally, but it’s cool to see him work his magic.
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  8. #8
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Good questions. I haven't measured the trigger weight on my LCR 9, but it's ok for what it is. I would rather err on the side of reliability and keep the gun stock. As well, given the LCR's purpose, I think a heavier trigger is not a bad thing. Pocket carry, drawing and firing through a garment, gun grappling...

    Similarly, all of my Glocks have stock triggers, and I won't be modifying pull weight on any of them.

    My P-07s have CGW parts to yield a DA pull around 7 to 8 lbs, and I have shot enough 1000's of rounds through them to be confident.

    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    Hello, I would love some opinions on where people personally like their revolver trigger weight for carry.

    And also if pocket versus holster carry affect that decision making for you?

    My LCR trigger is heavy but still lighter than a J frame trigger. I was thinking of doing the 9# apex for the SW rather than the 6# mcarbo. For semi-autos I personally usually hover around a 4.5-5.5# for carry gun trigger weight, but have 8# DA pulls on some guns.

    Thanks in advance!

    @Clusterfrack
    @jlw
    @jetfire
    @Dagga Boy
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  9. #9
    Gotta be a smooth even pull. It doesn't have to be super light.

    I had Randy Lee do a competition only 625. Double Action was 4.5# I think. That was too light for me. I had him do a Model 10 that I shot a lot in IDPA. It was around 6#. About 8# to 10# is the best range for me.

    I don't do anything to J-Frames.

  10. #10
    Old man yelling at cloud OlongJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie B View Post
    @Mas may have an opinion on this. My recollection is that reducing the weight of a trigger below that of factory specs in a self-defense revolver is not a great idea.
    I know that's been said, but it's overly simplistic. If you eliminate roughness, friction will be reduced, and therefore the trigger press will be lightened, even with unmolested factory springs. This is in fact the state of my GPMC. I think it's pretty reasonable for a defensive trigger, but I have no doubt that if 10 GPMCs were sampled at random, new out of the box, it's likely that 10 of them would measure with heavier trigger presses.

    It also brings up the question of what "factory specs" are. Take Beretta 92s. There are US military armorer's manuals available online that provide trigger press weight specs. But Erik has explained previously that Beretta has no internal factory trigger press weight spec. The spec is functionally-based: it must indent a NATO-spec primer to a minimum depth.

    I could go further, but I'll kind of wave my hands in that direction by saying a P320 without a mechanical external safety is widely regarded as "safe enough," including by the manufacturer and many agencies that have signed up to put tens of thousands of them in the holsters of our public servants.

    The "not lighter than factory" standard will get a DA press that has a much longer travel, requiring more force to start moving and A LOT more force to release the hammer to be deemed "not safe." I couldn't defend that situation on the basis of any fundamental engineering principle.
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