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Thread: Is there a standardized set of knife safety rules similar to Cooper’s 4 rules?

  1. #1
    happy sharps enabler Totem Polar's Avatar
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    Is there a standardized set of knife safety rules similar to Cooper’s 4 rules?

    I was thinking about this while putting a wave device on my Spyderco Civilian. I grew up doing scouting as a kid, and I’m old enough to remember some sort of “whittling award” that either cubs or webelos could earn; by the time I got to tenderfoot scout, I was well aware that a sharp knife is a safe knife; cut away from your body; the “blood circle;” no running with an open/unsheathed knife (although there was never a mention of doing aikido forward shoulder rolls with your open spyderco in reverse grip—a POI that I have experienced myself, with a surprising lack of bloodshed...).

    Yet the question remains: has any org put together anything concise enough to pass on, that meets all the requirements?

    A quick search reveals all sorts of lists—many of which are related to kitchen safety with cutlery—that are longer than a Tolstoy novel.

    How about it sharps heads? What should a “4 rules” look like?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Totem Polar View Post
    I was thinking about this while putting a wave device on my Spyderco Civilian. I grew up doing scouting as a kid, and I’m old enough to remember some sort of “whittling award” that either cubs or webelos could earn; by the time I got to tenderfoot scout, I was well aware that a sharp knife is a safe knife; cut away from your body; the “blood circle;” no running with an open/unsheathed knife (although there was never a mention of doing aikido forward shoulder rolls with your open spyderco in reverse grip—a POI that I have experienced myself, with a surprising lack of bloodshed...).

    Yet the question remains: has any org put together anything concise enough to pass on, that meets all the requirements?

    A quick search reveals all sorts of lists—many of which are related to kitchen safety with cutlery—that are longer than a Tolstoy novel.

    How about it sharps heads? What should a “4 rules” look like?
    When I studied traditional weapons during my TMA days, my sensei was very clear about treating even an unsharpened training weapon as though the edge or point was sharp. While the background is different, the result is the same: respect a point or edge the same way the muzzle of a gun is respected and thus avoid doing something stupid.

    The same concepts would seem to apply whether articulated in a set of rules or not.

    1) Loaded/unloaded = knife open/unsheathed or closed/sheathed.

    2) Pointed in a safe direction = edge or point not oriented towards something that should not be cut.

    3) Know your target = know what you are cutting (have you started damaging the item in the package you are opening?)

  3. #3
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    I'm far from an expert however I've learned a few things for Sayoc Kali practitioners. "Tip on" with a knife is the equivalent of sweeping someone with a firearm.

  4. #4
    Site Supporter
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    Have the knife appropriately sharpened as duller blades can be dangerous when used.
    Usually cut away from yourself. Don't need bagel hand or nose (ask my cousin and his nose).
    Correct knife for the task (more a foodie, outdoor thing).


    Minor rules
    Make sure it will KEAL (sorry).
    Remember the TSA (as my daughter's Spyderco had to be replaced by Dad).

  5. #5
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    My Grandfather paid the princely sum of $ .05 to attend a circus side show in 1903 which touted to give the greatest wisdom of all time. The then 5 year old Grandpa sat down and the curtain drew back.

    A little boy walks out and sits on a stool on stage with a stick. he takes out a knife and begins whittling. While making wood shavings, he repeated over and over, " Always cut away from yourself, and You'll never cut yourself..." That was it.

    My Grandpa felt duped by this, but here I am speaking of it 118 years later. You know, whilst following this greatest wisdom of all time, I have yet to cut myself!

  6. #6
    Back in the U.S._S.R. blues's Avatar
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    This side toward enemy
    Every day I convince myself that I can't be any more disgusted by what I see our country willingly turning itself into...
    ...and then wake up the next morning only to find just how wrong I was...

  7. #7
    Some Thoughts on Blade Safety

    If you are handing someone else an uncovered blade do it so that if they jerk it they cannot cut you.
    Example: with a chef's knife hold it by the spine with neither the edge or point toward either of you. This way if they jerk or stumble you are LESS likely to get cut.
    With a double edge this is more difficult.

    Carry sheathed fixed blades in such fashion that if you fall etc... you are not likely to impale or cut yourself. Motorcycles, horses, skiing etc... make this important.
    You do not want to roll and become skewered. Even the point of a sheathed blade can hurt you if you fall on it hard enough.

    Sheaths should be such that the knife does not cut out of them.
    Some sheath retaining straps would let the knife come part way out and then get reinserted and stab through the sheath.
    Some sort of retention, formed leather, Kydex etc... is helpful even if the sheath has a retaining strap. A strap is not necessary for many purposes.

    When cutting, stabbing make allowances for where the blade will go if deflected. Do not have body parts in that path. This gets more important as the size and weight of a sharp blade increases. A 2 pound razor sharp blade can cause major damage just falling on you, Add in a fast swing and it gets worse.

  8. #8
    1) All knives are thirsty.

    2) Some knives are more thirsty than others.
    Hain’t we got all the fools in town on our side? And ain’t that a big enough majority in any town?

  9. #9
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    In combatives training, making sure no one has a live blade is important. Often trainers look similar to live blades, so checking every time is a good idea. A new dude showed up late, and I spotted a live folder in his pocket.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  10. #10
    Never buy a cheap switchblade without a lock in a third world bazaar and give it to your knife collecting buddy when you get back because its going to open in his pocket and stab his leg Also do not buy Cuban cigars in said third world country and throw them in your suitcase along with switchblade. Its not worth the stress.
    It ain’t over till the fat lady sings.
    uneducated and low information
    I'll wager you a PF dollar™ 😎
    He needed a healthy dose of bonded bullets. LSP552

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