Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 89

Thread: Nuances of running the 1911 thumb safety (thread split)

  1. #21
    Member JHC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North Georgia
    Quote Originally Posted by theJanitor View Post
    If you don't have sufficient grip on the pistol, your support hand could drive the safety upward. It might be wise to try see if there are other significant disadvantages to shooting without riding the thumb safety down, even if it's just sandwiching the lever between your hands.
    Back in the 80's with GI A1 pattern pistols incl the left side only safety I shot with my thumb locked down but since returning to working with 1911s more recently I adopted the thumb on the safety and found I liked it much more. And this is more modern format pistols re ambi-safeties etc.

    It complimented (or so I think) my dual use of Glocks with high thumbs. It did not play well with the USP I briefly owned though, I'd re-safe during strings of fire.
    As a man sows, so shall he reap.

  2. #22
    Damnable 1911 Heretic Elwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    Midwest
    Quote Originally Posted by theJanitor View Post
    If you don't have sufficient grip on the pistol, your support hand could drive the safety upward. It might be wise to try see if there are other significant disadvantages to shooting without riding the thumb safety down, even if it's just sandwiching the lever between your hands.
    Yep, I've thought of that and even worried a bit about it, but so far it hasn't happened. I'll have to take a close look at my grip to see if I can pinpoint a reason why. It may be that my support hand is also far forward enough that it's really not likely to happen. It could also help that I run thin extended levers.

  3. #23
    Member JHC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    North Georgia
    I'm part of that % of the population whose finger joints bend backwards.

    Name:  001 thumb.jpg
Views: 275
Size:  37.0 KB

    Name:  002 thumb.jpg
Views: 274
Size:  32.5 KB

    If were expecting or preparing to shoot my thumb would get on top of the safety . . . waiting.
    As a man sows, so shall he reap.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by theJanitor View Post
    I can't go thumb under. there's just not enough room with my support hand.
    Same here. Support hand interference, compromises my strong hand placement a bit, and is rather slow for me. As I mentioned in original thread, shaping thumb safeties into a smaller profile helps me substantially with premature disengagement.
    I do use ambi safety for reholstrering control.
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  5. #25
    Site Supporter CSW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire.
    Quote Originally Posted by theJanitor View Post
    If you don't have sufficient grip on the pistol, your support hand could drive the safety upward. It might be wise to try see if there are other significant disadvantages to shooting without riding the thumb safety down, even if it's just sandwiching the lever between your hands.
    Being left handed, my support hand, mainly my right thumb, tends to be very close to the ejection port of a 1911.
    So much so, that I have devised a system for myself that my thumb finds the nub of the slide stop that protrudes from the ejection port side, and rests upon it, making very sure that I don't apply pressure to said nub.... Ask me how I know not to...

  6. #26
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland
    I really shouldn't post in this thread, having no 1911s anymore. However, I have to point out that the tongue-and-groove joint in the Swenson style ambi safety is a common point of failure. I had one break and lock up the gun, and I wasn't even applying pressure to it.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  7. #27
    Site Supporter CSW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire.
    ... Also, and it may just be something with me, and my medium sized hands, but I have found a better, more natural placement of my left shooting hand by going to a thin grip on the 1911.
    A set of thins and an ambi safety, and my left thumb naturally finds purchase under the safety at the top of the grip.

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    I think I am doing some kind of hybrid of what all is described here? In the past when I was competing, and if I was moving from target to target, and even when in training classes, what I am 100% sure of is my thumb safety is up. I am switched on and hear the "snick" on and off of my thumb safety every time I actuate it up or down. When it goes up I am *assuming* that my thumb goes back on top for the presentation to the target to then wipe it off to break the shot. I also take a high register position for the most part and keep my trigger finger in the ejection port.

    Like others have said with ambis, I know if that safety comes off because if I am not bringing my finger from the ejection port to the trigger, I have had a tendency to get bit. I think a good amount for me is the size of my paws (which are pretty meaty). I will have to be more observant and report back.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    NW Florida
    For historical purposes, I believe this thread grew out of the "Thumb safety pro/con's" thread ( https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....awsuit-thread) ), and much of the discussion in that thread involved failure to disengage a safety in a stressful circumstance.

    To avoid this problem, riding the thumb safety of a 1911 needs to become part of your grip and not something you do on your way to getting your grip. Getting a "full firing grip" should be done when the gun is in the holster, and that means getting to the thumb safety.

    Gunsite's Ed Head demonstrates the drawstroke early in this GunTalkTV video. Notice when he gets to the thumb safety at about the :40 mark in the video.



    It has been mentioned some sweat shields prevent access to the thumb safety (I'll note Todd Green's pistol-training "Basic Holster Development 101" http://pistol-training.com/archives/9692 ) and that should be something to consider if you are choosing a holster for a 1911. If you have a Glock or SIG P226 (DA/SA version) it doesn't really matter how tall your sweat shield is, but if you need to get to a thumb safety, you need to find it while the gun is holstered, and how big or tall the holster sweat shield is should be a consideration.

    If you look at the "old school" holster makers like Sparks, Rosen, Del Fatti, Kramer, etc., you'll notice most of their holsters don't have sweat shields, and the models that have sweat shields stop at the back of the slide. If you can't actually put your thumb on the thumb safety on these models, you can put your thumb on the top of the sweat shield and use it to push off as you draw and your thumb will naturally end up on the thumb safety.

  10. #30
    10.3" Master Race TGS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    "The Grim"
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwin View Post
    Hand size seems to be a huge factor. Unlike apparently most 1911 shooters, I also don't ride the safety when shooting, except when shooting one handed. My support hand is placed much too high for that,
    I'm having a hard time picturing this....can you post a picture? Does the meat at the base of your thumb actually "swallow" the safety?
    "Are you ready? Okay. Let's roll."- Last words of Todd Beamer

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •