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Thread: Ford Ranger plug-in hybrid

  1. #21
    Site Supporter rob_s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by farscott View Post
    On the range issue, the 2017 GT has a range of about 300-320 miles on 93 octane. The plug-in will have a range close to that.
    Is that accurate?

    yesterday when I went to the pre-order for the plug-in GT model I thought I saw 250 miles?

    When we were in Norway Teslas and the like were everywhere. And their infrastructure, even in pretty remote areas of the south, appeared pretty good relative to chargers. When we stopped for gas in our rental V90 we saw whole families sitting around outside the mountainside gas stations eating lunch while their Tesla charged. Of course, we were there in July, not January!
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  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by farscott View Post
    My wife's current vehicle is a 2017 Mustang GT Premium. The plan is to replace it with an AWD Mach E sometime in 2023-2024. The exact date depends on how desperate the OEMs are to sell as we always buy when demand is low and everyone is eager to make a deal. The goal is to purchase when the OEMs are desperate enough to offer good financing rates and good cash incentives that can both be used on the same transaction. ... I figure the second or third full year of production will be a good time to purchase as the economy should be a dumpster fire and the quality/design issues will be resolved while the major cost cutting has not gone into effect.
    IMO if this actually does get popular a big unknown might be the potential future scarcity of the required imported minerals.

    Quote Originally Posted by farscott View Post
    The way we use her vehicle, it will almost always get charged in our garage, so range should never be an issue.
    I think this is the big deal, two car family living in a single family dwelling with a dedicated spot in the garage and you never need to go to another gas station.

  3. #23
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob_s View Post
    Is that accurate?

    yesterday when I went to the pre-order for the plug-in GT model I thought I saw 250 miles?

    When we were in Norway Teslas and the like were everywhere. And their infrastructure, even in pretty remote areas of the south, appeared pretty good relative to chargers. When we stopped for gas in our rental V90 we saw whole families sitting around outside the mountainside gas stations eating lunch while their Tesla charged. Of course, we were there in July, not January!
    The Ford numbers are still preliminary and should improve, but 250 to 300 miles is enough for us. I doubt the car ever gets driven 150 miles in a day. The usual longest round trip is about sixty miles, and that is once per month. When my wife needs to drive farther, we swap vehicles as she usually wants the cargo space that my vehicle has. My round-trip commute is fifty miles. As such, even in cold weather, we should never have range issues. Her 2017 GT is 4.5 years old and has less than 50,000 miles, so it gets about 11,100 miles per year.

  4. #24
    Site Supporter rob_s's Avatar
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    Near as I can tell, if I go build the most bad-ass Ranger Tremor on ford.com right now, it comes to $48k.

    Make it go faster and get me into the HOV lane legally, and I very well might be a buyer.
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  5. #25
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmc45414 View Post
    IMO if this actually does get popular a big unknown might be the potential future scarcity of the required imported minerals.
    I think I've written at length about this in other parts of the forum so won't belabor it, but not really. Battery technology is changing the materials in question faster than our ability to consume them grows.

  6. #26
    THE THIRST MUTILATOR Nephrology's Avatar
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    How long do the batteries on a plug in hybrid last? Is that ever a limiting factor on the lifespan of a plug in hybrid vehicle? I don't really know anything about them. Assume they most hold up OK, prius plug in has been out for a long time.

  7. #27
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nephrology View Post
    How long do the batteries on a plug in hybrid last? Is that ever a limiting factor on the lifespan of a plug in hybrid vehicle? I don't really know anything about them. Assume they most hold up OK, prius plug in has been out for a long time.
    The Prius ones are good for at least a decade. I believe the Tesla batteries are also good for a decade. The original Nissan Leaf batteries suffered from poor heat management and did not last. There are multiple variables, including battery cell design, battery manufacturing and assembly, charging management, heat management, etc. There are only a few OEMs I would trust to get it right. None of them happen to be in Germany based on the OEM's warranty and reliability numbers.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by mmc45414 View Post
    IMO if this actually does get popular a big unknown might be the potential future scarcity of the required imported minerals.
    Ole President Joe is all over this battery issue, with an Executive Order this very week:

    The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the heads of appropriate agencies, shall submit a report identifying risks in the supply chain for high-capacity batteries, including electric-vehicle batteries, and policy recommendations to address these risks.

    https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-...supply-chains/

    I know I just enough about batteries to be dangerous. Does seem to be a solidly bipartisan issue.

  9. #29
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    I was listening to Elon musk’s latest interview on joe Rogan. He talks about the science and performance of electric cars. Musk talked about the limits of solar panels, particularly about the size requirements. Perhaps extra solar panels that fold out or roll out will become viable solutions.
    After my very brief employment with corporate cultural; dealing with computer engineers and any thing requiring software make me very wary. My big question is “does it work?” I am very interested in an electric vehicle for the performance. I wish Ford would make a hybrid version of the Excursion SUV. Make it in aluminum like the F250, small Diesel engine , plenty of room for batteries, a large roof for a solar panel. My wish list for a truck or suv starts with reliable and durable. Sounds like my guns. I daily drive an F250 crew cab diesel. It is literally too much. I keep hoping for an F250 diesel crew cab raptor. If they made a reliable, durable hybrid with similar performance; great. But I don’t think I could afford it. That’s another consideration. What good does it do if the majority can’t afford it?

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Poconnor View Post
    Musk talked about the limits of solar panels, particularly about the size requirements. Perhaps extra solar panels that fold out or roll out will become viable solutions.
    We are starting to shop RV stuff and are becoming quite interested in one of these, but with a TWO YEAR lead time might plop down a deposit since you have until you finalize the build 3-4mo out to actually commit:
    https://escapetrailer.com/the-5-0-escape/

    Anyhoo, have been cruising some of their forums and there is one pretty cool dude that likes to boondock off grid and likes his expresso and toasted bagels (I think his fridge is even a regular compressor type). He has switched out to lithium batteries and rigged panels that slide out once in camp, and they do double duty as awnings. Then he added some more over the bed of the Ridgeline that connect to and maintain the trailer batteries. Not sure if he really needs the suitcase panels, but I think he wrote that they are handy because they can be moved throughout the day, especially on cloudy days if you are in a shaded spot. The picture on the right shows them retracted, on a recent trip when he used it as a bugout vehicle to evacuate from the fires in California (the picture was from when he was on his way BACK home).

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