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Thread: RFI - Presses

  1. #11
    Lowly Production C-Class olstyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miller_man View Post
    Sound about right?
    That sounds like a completely reasonable solution, yes.

  2. #12
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    I am a broken record on this topic, but whenever people mention the Dillon 550, I have to question why anyone would choose it over the 650/750 or the Hornady LNL AP. I have no doubt that you can produce good ammo with a 550, but why limit yourself to 4 stations and manual indexing when 5 stations and auto indexing is easily available?

    If the motivation is price, the LNL AP is barely different than a 550 on price. If price isn't the motivation and you're a believer in Dillon being the best, then the 650/750 is not insanely more expensive than the 550.
    Reliability, durability, resale value, ease of setup, and learning curve. It's like the Gen3 G19 or Toyota Tacoma of progressive presses. You can't got wrong with a 550. A 550 was my first press, I learned how to reload on one, and I got pretty fast with it.
    #RESIST

  3. #13
    Lowly Production C-Class olstyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    Reliability, durability, resale value, ease of setup, and learning curve. It's like the Gen3 G19 or Toyota Tacoma of progressive presses. You can't got wrong with a 550. A 550 was my first press, I learned how to reload on one, and I got pretty fast with it.
    I'm just not seeing how a 650/750 is harder to set up or learn on than a 550 (might even be easier to learn on since there's one less thing for your hands to do with every cycle of the press), and the reliability, durability, and resale value (adjusted for the higher initial price, of course) should be equivalent, so that leaves what? In normal times, it would only be price as far as I can tell. These days availability could easily factor into it as well. Certainly it's reasonable to buy a 550 if you need a press and the higher end options aren't in stock anywhere, or you're buying used and you find a good deal...presuming of course that you can get components.

  4. #14
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    I'm just not seeing how a 650/750 is harder to set up or learn on than a 550 (might even be easier to learn on since there's one less thing for your hands to do with every cycle of the press), and the reliability, durability, and resale value (adjusted for the higher initial price, of course) should be equivalent, so that leaves what? In normal times, it would only be price as far as I can tell. These days availability could easily factor into it as well. Certainly it's reasonable to buy a 550 if you need a press and the higher end options aren't in stock anywhere, or you're buying used and you find a good deal...presuming of course that you can get components.
    To me, the 650 was definitely harder to learn than a 550.
    #RESIST

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    I'm just not seeing how a 650/750 is harder to set up or learn on than a 550 (might even be easier to learn on since there's one less thing for your hands to do with every cycle of the press), and the reliability, durability, and resale value (adjusted for the higher initial price, of course) should be equivalent, so that leaves what? In normal times, it would only be price as far as I can tell. These days availability could easily factor into it as well. Certainly it's reasonable to buy a 550 if you need a press and the higher end options aren't in stock anywhere, or you're buying used and you find a good deal...presuming of course that you can get components.
    The caliber changes are more expensive and more difficult, require more tweaking to get to run right. If something goes wrong in the process it is harder to fix. You really have to look at the volume you want to load and the number of calibers you want to load. I have a 1050 and a 550. 1050 for either 40 or 9mm, whatever I will shoot in USPSA that year. The 550 is for everything else.

    I don't know how anyone would ever regret buying a 550.

  6. #16
    Lowly Production C-Class olstyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bofe954 View Post
    The caliber changes are more expensive and more difficult, require more tweaking to get to run right.
    That's a fair point, and something I tend to forget, given that my personal choice was the Hornady LNL AP, where caliber changes are super easy and fairly cheap. (Just need another set of the LNL bushings and you're good, possibly another powder measure if you want to make it ultra fast/easy.)

  7. #17
    Site Supporter NPV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    Define "high volumes" in terms of a number of rounds/year.
    Probably around 1k per month of 45 Auto

    Around 4K per year of 38 Special

    TBD on 44 mag/45 Colt but probably not a lot itíll be for hunting

    I have experience with Hornady presses and I found them enjoyable to use. Especially when combined with L-N-L bushings so thatís a consideration too. I really need to look at prices on the Dillons a bit harder, Iíll be honest I have looked at the 550 and passed on the idea due to the manual indexing.

  8. #18
    Lowly Production C-Class olstyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NPV View Post
    Probably around 1k per month of 45 Auto

    Around 4K per year of 38 Special

    TBD on 44 mag/45 Colt but probably not a lot itíll be for hunting

    I have experience with Hornady presses and I found them enjoyable to use. Especially when combined with L-N-L bushings so thatís a consideration too. I really need to look at prices on the Dillons a bit harder, Iíll be honest I have looked at the 550 and passed on the idea due to the manual indexing.
    Opinions can and will vary, but it sounds to me like you're in prime Hornady LNL AP/Dillon 650/Dillon 750 territory. 16K rounds/year will not take long to "pay off" any of those presses with the savings. Multiple calibers to switch between does point at least somewhat in the direction of the Hornady because of the ease and speed of switching calibers on the press, but otherwise it's kind of a matter of weighing Dillon's excellent rep for quality and customer service against Hornady's good but not quite as awesome rep in that regard combined with their lower pricing.

  9. #19
    Site Supporter NPV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    Opinions can and will vary, but it sounds to me like you're in prime Hornady LNL AP/Dillon 650/Dillon 750 territory. 16K rounds/year will not take long to "pay off" any of those presses with the savings. Multiple calibers to switch between does point at least somewhat in the direction of the Hornady because of the ease and speed of switching calibers on the press, but otherwise it's kind of a matter of weighing Dillon's excellent rep for quality and customer service against Hornady's good but not quite as awesome rep in that regard combined with their lower pricing.
    So Iíve been perusing through some of Gavins stuff on YouTube. Iím kind of narrowing it down to the 650/750 or a LNL AP. Iím a little hung up on the difference between the 650 and 750, it seems like the priming system was revised, a cam roller was added for smoother operation, and zero fittings were added. Is the 650 still in production or is that something Iíd have to source in the secondary market?

    On the caliber changeover it seems, based on my limited research, Iíd need a quick change kit along with the conversion kit for the Dillon to be as streamlined as possible. And with the Hornady Iíd need a shell plate, LNL bushing set, and maybe a separate powder measure if I wanted. Obviously this wouldnít be inclusive of the die set and having to fiddle with the priming system but I think Iíve captured the basics.

    Right now all things are pointing to the Hornady for me, maybe Iím partial because of my experience with the LNL bushings in the past so Iím willing to be schooled. Also Iím trying to find the general pricing on these Iím not going full ammo plant with the electronic case feeder but it may be something I add down the road.

  10. #20
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    The Hornady will need more tuning and aftermarket parts to make it work right. The 750 will cost more and almost certainly work right out of the box. Either will be very hard to find.
    #RESIST

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