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Thread: A Mozambique question

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    The other question for you is why Mozambique if you have a good and confident head shot..
    There was a time when shooting FAST and, later, Gabe's standards was a big part of my routine and my aiwb draw was decent and all. I thought along the same lines, why not head. I then tested it in a class and even some matches and decided it wasn't happening outside 5 yards. No matter how good my 3x5 draw at 7 yards was. I was shooting irons then so perhaps the dot would give me more confidence. I still think that the liabilities and consequences of missing are high enough that taking lower probability shots has to have some building up to.
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by YVK View Post
    There was a time when shooting FAST and, later, Gabe's standards was a big part of my routine and my aiwb draw was decent and all. I thought along the same lines, why not head. I then tested it in a class and even some matches and decided it wasn't happening outside 5 yards. No matter how good my 3x5 draw at 7 yards was. I was shooting irons then so perhaps the dot would give me more confidence. I still think that the liabilities and consequences of missing are high enough that taking lower probability shots has to have some building up to.
    I agree with you. I was talking about 5 yards and in... if someone has a bladed weapon and is advancing.
    If they’re 5 yards and closing, I want them stopped RIGHT NOW.

    You might not have time for the second or third shot of a Mozambique if they’re 5 yards and closing.
    So why not go head or go bust.

  3. #23
    Site Supporter LOKNLOD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn E. Meyer View Post
    IIRC, one well known someone got in trouble as his solution to save the baby was to toss it like a football behind the truck from a distance. That's so he could get a two handed grip. GAMER!
    I was at a match with similar stage, one guy grabbed the baby's leg, shoved it into his waistband, and then run'n'gunned with baby flopping from his belt like Pat Mac's towel while shooting two-handed. Brilliant!

    Also, therein lies the answer to your question:
    I was simply asking why it wasn't part of matches
    which you answered for yourself:
    Matches are not practice, I know that - nor are they training.
    Because there's no need to put it in the stages since they have nothing to do with practice or training. It's a game. Nothing more, nothing less, than that.
    --Josh

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn E. Meyer View Post
    1. I have joined USPSA as is the game easiest for me to shoot in my area and it's fun.

    2. Looked at this thread: https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....Shooting/page2

    and it jogged my memory, the club leader gave me an orientation lecture and a shooting test. I asked about Mozambique drills (not with purpose, just asking about how matches run), he said they were not allowed. I searched and found on the Enos forum that they were forbidden due to difficulty in scoring.

    We shot them in IDPA all the time and seeing the shooting I posted, it seems like something one might want to include. I know it's a game. I like it, so not trying to start a flame war - which will start anyway.
    This might be a bit of an outsiders perspective but I read the following link to refresh my memory a bit more in depth on the Mozambique and its history/development.

    https://www.shootingillustrated.com/...ry-and-how-to/

    Your question to me then reads more as a "skills vs. tactics" question. The Mozambique has its roots in solving a military/swat type of tactical problem.

    USPSA is (as I see it) more of a pure shooting skills sport. So it really isn't worried about tactics. So what you are noticing here is the same reason why IDPA has cover rules (tactics) and USPSA does not.

    As a pure shooting skills sport, USPSA doesn't seem to really concern itself with defensive tactics and focuses only on testing purely who are the best pistol shooters on the planet. IDPA keeps a margin of "tactics" involved. Hence the incorporation of cover, concealment, and tactics like the Mozambique.

    Since you posted this in the IPSC/USPSA section, I imagine you are probably going to get sport/pure skill/game based reactions the same as if you posted in a boxing forum why they don't allow leg kicks or take downs.

    Just my take though as someone who has done more reading than shooting.

  5. #25
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Some of us gamers also train DT...
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    I agree with you. I was talking about 5 yards and in... if someone has a bladed weapon and is advancing.
    If they’re 5 yards and closing, I want them stopped RIGHT NOW.

    You might not have time for the second or third shot of a Mozambique if they’re 5 yards and closing.
    So why not go head or go bust.
    Which can you move out of the way faster - head or torso - might be one consideration in picking target zone.

    Movement off threat axis versus straight back or stand your ground is also a viable tactic.

  7. #27
    Site Supporter Zincwarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn E. Meyer View Post
    1. I have joined USPSA as is the game easiest for me to shoot in my area and it's fun.

    2. Looked at this thread: https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....Shooting/page2

    and it jogged my memory, the club leader gave me an orientation lecture and a shooting test. I asked about Mozambique drills (not with purpose, just asking about how matches run), he said they were not allowed. I searched and found on the Enos forum that they were forbidden due to difficulty in scoring.

    We shot them in IDPA all the time and seeing the shooting I posted, it seems like something one might want to include. I know it's a game. I like it, so not trying to start a flame war - which will start anyway.
    Run and Gun focuses on the Run part. Waddle and Shoot focuses on the shoot part.
    Also, the A scoring area of a USPSA target is even smaller than the down 0 scoring area of the new IDPA target.
    For the record its easy to stage stacked targets requiring head shots. Its definitely not uncommon. The worst for me is the dread combo of one target vertically like normal and the other upside down behind it. Shooting that tends to mess me up.


    Just enjoy that USPSA has lots of steel and no 'shoot me first' vest requirements.
    Last edited by Zincwarrior; 02-08-2021 at 08:10 AM.

  8. #28
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    True. I understand that different games have different scoring for various scenarios and problems. Certainly, football and basketball do.

    This was one possible problem to be in the game and it was not included because of scoring arguments but then simulated with truncated targets within the rule structure as compared to an explicit problem.

    Critiques of organizational/match orthopraxy is like a religious argument to some.

    Running - not for my old body. Like Zinc, I will sedately move. I note seeing young runners sometimes fall down and go boom. One gentleman slide past his planned firing position and had to return to hit, throwing his plan down the drain. A couple almost tripped on the box. However, in IDPA, I did see a guy run and fall flat on his face, that was scary.

    It's not training - got that, trained my butt off in my time. On the IDPA side, truly annoying was a guy who decided to be realistic and had to yell, DROP the gun - at each target. He lasted one match.

    Tueller world - yep, in training moving off line in a pattern to disrupt the charger was taught and practiced. However, with Airsoft and masks, getting a head shot is a challenge, thus the COM first.

    Thanks for the input.

  9. #29
    Site Supporter Zincwarrior's Avatar
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    I should note, clubs are always looking for people who want to help plan stages. You could design and submit a stage with a target covered by an NT except for the head or almost everything but the head. There are multiple sites that have compilations of stages, and the is an FB site that does nothing but discuss stages. In addition to some of the cool packages to draw up stages, power point has a simple one I use (because I am simple). I can email it if you can't find.


    Lets restate...CLUBS are ALWAYS looking for help.

    Just a few.
    https://tridentstagedesigner.com/library.php
    https://www.pinterest.com/b2g444/uspsa-stages/
    http://www.k8nd.com/stage.htm

  10. #30
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn E. Meyer View Post
    Running - not for my old body. Like Zinc, I will sedately move. I note seeing young runners sometimes fall down and go boom. ... A couple almost tripped on the box. However, in IDPA, I did see a guy run and fall flat on his face, that was scary.
    As long as it's done safely, learning to move dynamically (whatever that means for a given individual) with a gun is good practice for the real world. Dryfire or a Bluegun is a great way to practice falling and getting up safely.

    One gentleman slid past his planned firing position and had to return to hit, throwing his plan down the drain.
    That happens a lot, and it isn't a problem--it's good training. Learning to calmly and safely get back on the rails after a stage plan goes awry is an important skill that has so many practical applications.

    It's not training - got that, trained my butt off in my time. On the IDPA side, truly annoying was a guy who decided to be realistic and had to yell, DROP the gun - at each target. He lasted one match.
    [FACEPALM] Did he also do a Sul-and-scan after each target array?
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

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