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Thread: RFI - Lyman Brass-Smith All American 8 Turret Press vs Redding T7

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    RFI - Lyman Brass-Smith All American 8 Turret Press vs Redding T7

    I'm looking at getting started reloading and, for a few reasons, I like the idea of a turret press for me. It's more convenient and faster than a single stage (which I think would make me crazy) but deliberate enough that I think I'm less likely to mess up a step. A progressive is more expensive, maybe more susceptible to error for me and I'm unlikely to ever want to load in significant volume. In the short term, I expect to load 9mm, .38 and/or .357; maybe some 5.56 later on. I don't see anything else on the horizon right now but who knows?

    The contenders for turret presses seem to be RCBS, Lee, Redding and Lyman. I'd like something that's made in the US, which I understand leaves RCBS out. I don't think I want to go with Lee because the plastic safety primer setup makes me uncomfortable compared to a shielded tube. I've looked at the Redding T7 and the Lyman Brass-Smith All American 8 Turret and I like what I see of both. The Lyman product looks like it may be a better value but there seems to be less information available about it. Unless there's a reason to avoid it, I'd be inclined to go with the Lyman unless a Redding comes along sooner. I suppose I could also go with a Dillon 550 and use it like a turret press, but the added cost seems pointless to me.

    I'd be grateful for any thoughts or advice people can offer. Thanks.

  2. #2
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    Iím not so certain about RCBS being made overseas, but I like your choices. This should be a good thread.
    #RESIST

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    Iím not so certain about RCBS being made overseas, but I like your choices. This should be a good thread.
    Some of their stuff says it's made in the US and some doesn't. A little googling suggests that some of their models (or the frames) are made in China now. I'd love to find out I was wrong about that, though. And thanks.

  4. #4
    Since you mentioned the Lee, I'll say that their Classic Turret press is such a good value when properly configured that I recommend it all the time. Despite have an LnL now, I still smile whenever I decide to stand the little LCT back up for a bit of loading. It's very capable and a loading rate of +200 rounds/hr is feasible (but certainly more tiring than the same rate on a progressive press).

    Kempf gun shop used to sell the press properly configured but it looks like their site is down. If you elect to go the Lee route, you want the Classic Turret press (4 hole), their newer drum-powder measure and their safety prime system. Those are the essentials. Lee's factory crimp die works really well also; you can go Lee for the other dies or use another manufacturer.

    ETA: Just saw your concern about Lee's plastic safety prime system. I had no issues with it over many thousands of rounds. The primers sit up on the press away from the case when it's actually primed so I'd see the possibility of a daisy-chain being much lower than on a press that keeps a tube of primers closer to the actual priming process.
    Last edited by ER_STL; 01-26-2021 at 06:45 PM.

  5. #5
    I seem to recall reading several years ago that RCBS, and perhaps others, have the press frame castings made overseas and they finish them here.

    I loaded lots of pistol ammunition years ago on a Lee turret. I liked the ease of caliber changes. I gave it away after getting a Dillon 550 and my grandpaís CH Pistol Champ. I have a Redding T7 on the bench too for rifle ammo but havenít used it much over the past ten or so years.

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    Thanks. I appreciate the input.

    ETA: On the safety primer system, my concern isn't so much the likelihood of a daisy chain explosion but the result if it happens. I think the odds are extremely slim anything will ever happen, but if it does, the steel safety shield tube seems inherently safer to me. That's what drives that.
    Last edited by Erik; 01-26-2021 at 07:24 PM.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik View Post
    ETA: On the safety primer system, my concern isn't so much the likelihood of a daisy chain explosion but the result if it happens. I think the odds are extremely slim anything will ever happen, but if it does, the steel safety shield tube seems inherently safer to me. That's what drives that.
    I really think you need to reconsider.

    There's really nothing on the Lee system that's going to set off a primer. Everything is plastic until you get to the cup that presses the primer into the case, and the primers are fed purely by their own gravity--no low-primer rod. Even if you fail to set a primer and try to dispense the next one, there's nothing to press the primer into the cup. I suppose you could maybe set some off by having your priming system and Auto-Disk powder dispenser at horrendously bad angles and then really whanging the handle around, but it would be tough, as the priming arm is much more likely to just fall off. In fact, the only primer detonations I hear (heh) of involving Lee presses are on the Loadmaster, when the primer seating depth is mis-adjusted. And the Loadmaser is the only Lee press that has that.

    Meanwhile, metallic primer rods absolutely do not contain primer detonations.

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    The Dillon 750 has a redesigned priming system to avoid the above issue that was fairly well-known on 650s that were allowed to get dirty. It also has two rods surrounding the actual stacked primers (IIRC--I'm still setting mine up). Even still--safety glasses.

    The Redding and Lyman Turrets Of Many Stations you're considering are really good if you want to load a few different rifle cartridges and leave your dies set up. For handgun reloading, I don't think they offer many advantages over a single-stage. You would really be best-served by a Lee turret with auto-indexing. If you absolutely cannot accept the Lee priming system, look to a Dillon 550 without any extras. It'll be significantly more expensive than the Lee press, but to be frank, you're going to spend way more on ancillary tools, a bench, lighting, etc.

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    Thank you very much. That's a really helpful response. I appreciate it and will read it through a few times.

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    Well, that was fast. Based on the above I went and did some more research on the safety prime system and watched some videos of it being used. Watching it in action, I think my concern wasn't warranted. It does actually seem at least as safe as any other setup, maybe more so given that there's a good bit of distance between the primer seating area and the rest of the primers in the feeder. So, on a whim, I poked around and found the Lee Classic Turret in stock at Titan Reloading aaaand I ordered one along with a safety prime system and powder measure riser. The autodisk powder measure was out of stock. I expect I'll find one somewhere. Thank you again for taking the time to post that information. It was very helpful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik View Post
    The autodisk powder measure was out of stock. I expect I'll find one somewhere. Thank you again for taking the time to post that information. It was very helpful.
    You want the newer auto "drum" powder measure, not the older auto"disk" system. Its much more precise with any load. With the autodisk, you are stuck with the preformed hole sizes in the disks

    https://www.amazon.com/Lee-LP90811-A...-2&tag=mh0b-20

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