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Thread: You won't believe what broke on my Glunk!

  1. #1
    Site Supporter dogcaller's Avatar
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    Jun 2013
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    Northern Colorado

    You won't believe what broke on my Glunk!

    This one threw me for a loop.

    So I have an old G19--Gen 2 I believe, circa mid-90s--that I bought new and has been my primary carry piece over the years. It probably has 10-15k rounds through it. I've made no changes to it other than sights and the recoil spring a couple of times, just to be safe. I've had two broken trigger return springs in that time, the second one being just a month or so ago.

    I'm not exactly useless, but I tend not to fiddle with the internals of my handguns too much, recognizing my own limitations, and figuring they were designed that way for a reason. Having not detail stripped the gun in many years, I watched a video and replaced the trigger return spring (OEM).

    Fast forward a couple of weeks and I head to the range. The first few rounds worked fine, then I get a click instead of a bang. Tap-rack-(no)bang. Detail strip again, thinking I must've reassembled it incorrectly when I notice the striker doesn't have much of a pointy end. Looks like the tip sheared of pretty cleanly. Pic here.

    Just curious if anyone else has experienced this? Seems like a low-probability type of incident, but maybe I just haven't been paying attention. I'll order a new striker. Planning to just buy OEM, but is there any advantage to an aftermarket model? I don't think the lock time is the problem when my rounds go wide, but figured I'd ask. Also, are all G19 strikers the same (through the generations)?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    I have broken the tip off a striker a few times over the years, and would just get another OEM replacement and carry on.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by dogcaller View Post
    This one threw me for a loop.

    So I have an old G19--Gen 2 I believe, circa mid-90s--that I bought new and has been my primary carry piece over the years. It probably has 10-15k rounds through it. I've made no changes to it other than sights and the recoil spring a couple of times, just to be safe. I've had two broken trigger return springs in that time, the second one being just a month or so ago.

    I'm not exactly useless, but I tend not to fiddle with the internals of my handguns too much, recognizing my own limitations, and figuring they were designed that way for a reason. Having not detail stripped the gun in many years, I watched a video and replaced the trigger return spring (OEM).

    Fast forward a couple of weeks and I head to the range. The first few rounds worked fine, then I get a click instead of a bang. Tap-rack-(no)bang. Detail strip again, thinking I must've reassembled it incorrectly when I notice the striker doesn't have much of a pointy end. Looks like the tip sheared of pretty cleanly. Pic here.

    Just curious if anyone else has experienced this? Seems like a low-probability type of incident, but maybe I just haven't been paying attention. I'll order a new striker. Planning to just buy OEM, but is there any advantage to an aftermarket model? I don't think the lock time is the problem when my rounds go wide, but figured I'd ask. Also, are all G19 strikers the same (through the generations)?

    Thanks!
    If that's a black colored striker, it was in the recall that wasn't a recall from the late 1990s. There are several parts that Glock would replace. I'd contact Glock. If your trigger bar is also black it will need the upgrade.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2015
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    Central Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by dogcaller View Post
    This one threw me for a loop.

    So I have an old G19--Gen 2 I believe, circa mid-90s--that I bought new and has been my primary carry piece over the years. It probably has 10-15k rounds through it. I've made no changes to it other than sights and the recoil spring a couple of times, just to be safe. I've had two broken trigger return springs in that time, the second one being just a month or so ago.

    I'm not exactly useless, but I tend not to fiddle with the internals of my handguns too much, recognizing my own limitations, and figuring they were designed that way for a reason. Having not detail stripped the gun in many years, I watched a video and replaced the trigger return spring (OEM).

    Fast forward a couple of weeks and I head to the range. The first few rounds worked fine, then I get a click instead of a bang. Tap-rack-(no)bang. Detail strip again, thinking I must've reassembled it incorrectly when I notice the striker doesn't have much of a pointy end. Looks like the tip sheared of pretty cleanly. Pic here.

    Just curious if anyone else has experienced this? Seems like a low-probability type of incident, but maybe I just haven't been paying attention. I'll order a new striker. Planning to just buy OEM, but is there any advantage to an aftermarket model? I don't think the lock time is the problem when my rounds go wide, but figured I'd ask. Also, are all G19 strikers the same (through the generations)?

    Thanks!
    We have issued hundreds of Glock pistols from the gen 2 G17 to our current G3 and 4 G23s.
    I have replaced three strikers for this reason since the ‘90s.
    Just get a new one put in and keep shooting.

  5. #5
    I would replace it with a Gen3 factory striker and not worry about it at all. Stuff breaks when you use them.

    For years I have kept a parts kit stashed away with all sorts of factory parts, "Just In Case".




    I figure I can rebuild 1 Glock a half dozen times, or a half dozen Glocks once.

    Same with ARs.

    Plus there is a sense of security knowing you are not at the mercy of a supply chain in times of unrest.

    “Those who control the present, control the past and those who control the past control the future.”

    ― George Orwell, 1984

  6. #6
    Site Supporter
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    In the desert, looking for water.
    I like to buy two of anything that breaks on a gun: one to replace the currently broken part, and a spare for the next time (even if that's another 10 years from now).

    One of the reasons I finally converted to almost exclusive use of Glocks for serious stuff is that it doesn't take a gunsmith to replace pretty much anything on it, and they rarely need anything replaced, anyway. I mean, good night, 15k rounds through one gun, you've broken two springs and a striker. That's a pretty good record.

  7. #7
    Member
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    Jul 2017
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    California
    Parts do break. I lost a trigger return spring in a HK. Now I keep track of my round counts and replace high wear compenents on a preemptive basis.

  8. #8
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    CT (behind Enemy lines)
    I've seen the locking lug shear clean off a G22 barrel.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2016
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    TX
    Quote Originally Posted by dogcaller View Post
    Just curious if anyone else has experienced this? Seems like a low-probability type of incident, but maybe I just haven't been paying attention. I'll order a new striker. Planning to just buy OEM, but is there any advantage to an aftermarket model? I don't think the lock time is the problem when my rounds go wide, but figured I'd ask. Also, are all G19 strikers the same (through the generations)?
    Yes, I had that happen last year on the G17 I use for USPSA. Went to a match, and when I started trying to shoot on the first stage, got nothing when I pulled the trigger. Tap, rack and still nothing. Tap, rack again and still nothing. Crap, are my reloads really that terrible? Then after RO stopped me, I took the gun apart in the safety area and found the striker was broken. I got to shoot my carry gun that match.

  10. #10
    Site Supporter GearFondler's Avatar
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    May 2019
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    I go with the Overwatch Precision striker just to avoid this possibility. It's milled, not MIM, but otherwise identical to the OEM striker... No lightening cuts, holes, or other nonsense that could create a breakage or compromise safety.
    (I learned my lesson with a milled and lightened striker from a well known source that broke at the striker's tail... As in the whole fucking tail snapped off. I'm sure they would have replaced it for free but I wasn't interested in another one, having lost all faith in the product)

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