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Thread: suggestions for focus on front sight

  1. #1

    suggestions for focus on front sight

    It is strange, sometimes I have no difficulty focusing on the front sight, sometimes I have. One of the reasons might be that more or less light is on it. But still, I wonder if anyone has an advice on how to more easily focus on the front sight?

    Peter

  2. #2
    Another thing is to use high contrast target.

    For black irons, use a white target with a small red mark (can be with a sharpie or paster).

    But honestly, if you’re new a red dot optic gun can help you a lot with sight feedback.

    I spent most of my dedicated training on dot guns and I think it helped me improve faster with better feedback.

  3. #3
    Wag more, Bark less RJ's Avatar
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    Absolutely.

    I have a few things you can try:

    One is to buy a pair of full lens, + diopter safety glasses. I have a pair in +2.0.

    https://www.amazon.com/Elvex-RX-350-...ustrial&sr=1-5

    Two is to wear a simple AAA Headlamp or similar, while you practice.

    https://www.amazon.com/PETZL-TIKKINA...9598224&sr=8-2

    Using these will help illuminate the front sight and make it easier for you to see. I used to do this quite frequently, especially for Wall Drill practice so I could see what the heck was going on with my front sight.

    Lately I've been playing around with a laser boresighter. If you drop one of these in your chamber, you can see what the gun is doing at the "click"; perhaps not quite like seeing the front sight but if you are jerking it down, it will show up.

    https://www.amazon.com/Gogoku-12-Gau...9598344&sr=8-7
    Character is doing the right thing when nobody's looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that's right is to get by, and the only thing that's wrong is to get caught.
    — J. C. Watts

  4. #4
    What helps me is to get into my shooting position and focus on the front sight as clearly as possible then walk through my empty house while continuing to focus on the front sight. The change in background from light walls to dark, pictures and other objects as well as varying light conditions makes it challenging but works for front sight focus while other factors change in the foreground and background. All while in a safe and familiar environment. Empty house for safety and not looking like a weirdo to anyone.

    This is also how I choose sights as it demonstrates how light affects the front sight width to rear sight notch and color of front sight.

  5. #5
    Site Supporter
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    Midwest
    Great ideas so far.

    Question- when is the last time you hade your eyes examined?

    Is your Rx current etc?
    I am not your attorney. I am not giving legal advice. Any and all opinions expressed are personal and my own and are not those of any employer-past, present or future.

  6. #6
    Site Supporter CCT125US's Avatar
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    One exercise is to shift your focus from near to far. For example, while driving, shift focus from the window smudge to the road.

    Also this epic thread is a must read:


    https://pistol-forum.com/showthread.php?10210-Vision
    SWYNTS
    Just because it "feels good", doesn't mean it's best.

  7. #7
    Regular guy. Cory's Avatar
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    A lot of instructors will tell you to focus on the front sight. They mean well, and repeat what they've heard others say. Focus doesn't neccessarily mean pointing your eyes at the sight. And neither pointing your eyes at the sight or "focusing" to make it clear are absolutely required to make good hits.

  8. #8
    Just as an example, I still think most newer shooters are better off with dots than irons.

    Just target focus all the time. The way you would normally address things.

    Plus, you get a better view of the target without the slide blocking out 1/2 of the sight picture.

    These are both head box A-zone sighting. One with irons and one with the red dot.

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  9. #9
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    suggestions for focus on front sight

    Prior posts already hit it out of the park.

    Make sure you are looking out of the center of your eyes, without tipping your head. This makes a big difference in focal ability.

    Also, maybe you don’t need a hard front sight focus to shoot well? Suggest experimenting with that. What do you need to confirm front and rear sight alignment with the target?
    Last edited by Clusterfrack; 01-02-2021 at 12:06 PM.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  10. #10
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCN View Post
    ...most newer shooters are better off with dots than irons.
    This is an interesting topic in itself. See Karl Rhen’s study, which suggests that new shooters may be better off with irons or lasers.

    https://blog.krtraining.com/red-dot-study-key-points/

    Another consideration, if a new shooter starts with a RDS, will learning irons be more difficult? Sort of like learning to snowboard before skiing?

    Do we want to train shooters who cannot shoot a pistol without a RDS?
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

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