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Thread: e2 to e4

  1. #1

    e2 to e4

    Talked to @cheby today. He said he downloaded a chess playing app. Says both sports have GM designations, and drew some other parallels. I think he may be high on pain meds after a recent arm seppuku attempt but I do wonder if it may help in breaking down memory stages. Anybody can relate?
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  2. #2
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    I can't speak to chess, but re: memory stages -

    One of the things I do to train for memory stages in dry fire is to pick specific targets in a specific order from various shooting positions out of all the targets I have hung in my garage for dry fire. The order or number of targets may make no sense. For example, If I have a collection of 8 targets in one spot, I may only shoot at 4 of them from a certain position, and I may not shoot them in a logical order. Then I'll mentally rehearse that shooting plan several times and then run the course once. I'll then come up with a new random shooting order and target selection from various positions and repeat.

    I found that early on in doing this, I made a lot of mental mistakes where I would shoot more targets than I planned from a position or shoot the right targets but not in the "planned" order. After several sessions of training this though, I got to where I was nailing the plan 9 out of 10 times, with only little execution mistakes once in awhile.

    This is only a small portion of my dry fire, but I rarely make stage plan execution mistakes (i.e. where I do something that I didn't plan to do) in actual matches anymore.

  3. #3
    I dry fire in my basement. Even though I've over a dozen targets in 270 deg arrangement, my ability to set a confusing arrangement is limited. That said, I am gonna try it.
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  4. #4
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland
    1. @cheby, WTF? Hope it's not serious.
    2. Really complicated memory stages are dumb, and don't test practical shooting. They are especially hard on newer shooters, who get penalized with a bunch of M/FTSA. If new shooters are zeroing a stage, the stage design sucks. Fortunately--at least at the matches I've attended in the last few years--memory stages are becoming less popular.
    3. When I realized that small differences in stage plans don't usually contribute much to the overall score, memory stages got a lot easier. I just figure out a straightforward way to shoot all the targets.
    4. You need to make things complicated to win at chess, and usually making things simple is the way to win at USPSA.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  5. #5
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    In the desert, looking for water.
    And here I was thinking, “whose kid got promoted?”

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