Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32

Thread: Reluctant to prep the trigger

  1. #11
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland
    Quote Originally Posted by HCountyGuy View Post
    Part of my reluctance I would wager stems from... "Keep your finger off the trigger till your sights are on the target"
    What does "on the target" mean to you? I would be comfortable getting on the trigger in 1-4 below. I would not start pressing the trigger for 5. How about you?

    1. Stable sight picture, perfect alignment, center of target.
    2. Wobbly sight picture, ok alignment, near center of target.
    3. Flash sight picture, on target, away from the edges.
    4. No sight picture, on target, away from the edges.
    5. No sight picture probably not on target.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    What does "on the target" mean to you? I would be comfortable getting on the trigger in 1-4 below. I would not start pressing the trigger for 5. How about you?

    1. Stable sight picture, perfect alignment, center of target.
    2. Wobbly sight picture, ok alignment, near center of target.
    3. Flash sight picture, on target, away from the edges.
    4. No sight picture, on target, away from the edges.
    5. No sight picture probably not on target.
    My thought process with Cooper's Rule 3 is the only way to know one's sights are on target is to have visual verification of such.

    My hesitance would start to come in to play in number 4. While I recognize in such a scenario I'm likely close enough to the target to not need complete visual verification it is something my brain still tends to want me to have anyway, unless it weren't feasible to do so (retention shooting with a thumb-pectoral index)
    “It’s time for us to unite so we can heal” - spoken by the people who have been viciously attacking others of differing political alignment for four years. I think they misspelled “heel”.

  3. #13
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland

    Reluctant to prep the trigger

    Quote Originally Posted by HCountyGuy View Post
    My thought process with Cooper's Rule 3 is the only way to know one's sights are on target is to have visual verification of such.

    My hesitance would start to come in to play in number 4. While I recognize in such a scenario I'm likely close enough to the target to not need complete visual verification it is something my brain still tends to want me to have anyway, unless it weren't feasible to do so (retention shooting with a thumb-pectoral index)
    I guessed that’s what you would say. Of course this is dependent on individual, skill level, and target difficulty. But, reasonably skilled shooters can be confident shooting at least 7 yd USPSA targets with #4 (no sight picture, just mechanical alignment/index).

    Once you’re comfortable about knowing where the gun is pointing before confirming with sights, you can start shooting ‘proactively’, ahead of confirmation. That’s a lot faster.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  4. #14
    I’m confident I could get accurate hits on target in scenario 4, it’s just a matter of re-wiring my subconscious to permit me to.
    “It’s time for us to unite so we can heal” - spoken by the people who have been viciously attacking others of differing political alignment for four years. I think they misspelled “heel”.

  5. #15
    Self-Immolating RevolverRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Baddest Part of Town...
    Have you got access to a RDS equipped pistol?

    If so you might try just bringing the gun up and 'filling the window' with target and as soon as the window is 'full' get on the trigger. You're trying to rewire your brain as to what 'sight alignment' looks like. And the easiest way I've found to do this, is by breaking away from post and notch sights for a bit.

    For me, once I got comfortable with the recognition that the size of the target in the optic window (i.e. how 'filled' the window is by the target) was directly related to where my bullet would go I got much more comfortable with getting on the trigger with less visual confirmation of sight alignment on irons, because I knew roughly what the target should look like before the front sight got into focus.

    Alternatively I like the scaled USPSA dry-fire targets from Ben Stoeger Pro Shop. The scaled targets really help you get a sense of how much target you can cover (or not) with your muzzle. This in turn lets me calibrate my brain for on/off the trigger with 'no', 'meh', and 'good' sight alignment.
    Seriously guys, are we not doing 'phrasing' anymore?

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by RevolverRob View Post
    Have you got access to a RDS equipped pistol?

    If so you might try just bringing the gun up and 'filling the window' with target and as soon as the window is 'full' get on the trigger. You're trying to rewire your brain as to what 'sight alignment' looks like. And the easiest way I've found to do this, is by breaking away from post and notch sights for a bit.

    For me, once I got comfortable with the recognition that the size of the target in the optic window (i.e. how 'filled' the window is by the target) was directly related to where my bullet would go I got much more comfortable with getting on the trigger with less visual confirmation of sight alignment on irons, because I knew roughly what the target should look like before the front sight got into focus.

    Alternatively I like the scaled USPSA dry-fire targets from Ben Stoeger Pro Shop. The scaled targets really help you get a sense of how much target you can cover (or not) with your muzzle. This in turn lets me calibrate my brain for on/off the trigger with 'no', 'meh', and 'good' sight alignment.
    I'm actually running a Glock 19 with Holosun 507C.
    “It’s time for us to unite so we can heal” - spoken by the people who have been viciously attacking others of differing political alignment for four years. I think they misspelled “heel”.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by HCountyGuy View Post
    My thought process with Cooper's Rule 3 is the only way to know one's sights are on target is to have visual verification of such.

    My hesitance would start to come in to play in number 4. While I recognize in such a scenario I'm likely close enough to the target to not need complete visual verification it is something my brain still tends to want me to have anyway, unless it weren't feasible to do so (retention shooting with a thumb-pectoral index)
    That is why I said practice your drawstroke in front of a mirror and assure that your muzzle is aligned horizontally and vertically, under your master eye - this builds the basics of stance directed firing within 5 yards for most folks and 10 yards for some.

    If you do your draw enough, you should be able to reference at which stage of the draw you will be 'on target.' Of course, considerations such as target size, range, and degree of precision required should play a role in your decision making.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    That is why I said practice your drawstroke in front of a mirror and assure that your muzzle is aligned horizontally and vertically, under your master eye - this builds the basics of stance directed firing within 5 yards for most folks and 10 yards for some.

    If you do your draw enough, you should be able to reference at which stage of the draw you will be 'on target.' Of course, considerations such as target size, range, and degree of precision required should play a role in your decision making.
    I will try this for my next dry-fire session. Thank you!
    “It’s time for us to unite so we can heal” - spoken by the people who have been viciously attacking others of differing political alignment for four years. I think they misspelled “heel”.

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    SATX
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    I guessed that’s what you would say. Of course this is dependent on individual, skill level, and target difficulty. But, reasonably skilled shooters can be confident shooting at least 7 yd USPSA targets with #4 (no sight picture, just mechanical alignment/index).

    Once you’re comfortable about knowing where the gun is pointing before confirming with sights, you can start shooting ‘proactively’, ahead of confirmation. That’s a lot faster.
    Did Mr. Cooper teach a close-in technique similar to this at Gunsite?

  10. #20
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Redneck wonderland
    Quote Originally Posted by Redhat View Post
    Did Mr. Cooper teach a close-in technique similar to this at Gunsite?
    Not sure, but I understand that Ben Stoeger has a contract with a Tier 1 Unit. I've been drawing heavily on his approach in this discussion. By close-in, do you mean ECQC thumb-pec index close?
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •