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Thread: Tier 1, 1.5, or even Tier 2 tools thread

  1. #161
    Quote Originally Posted by OlongJohnson View Post
    I find it entertaining that "Old man yelling at cloud" and "GET OFF MY LAWN" guy are in full agreement.
    Dinosaur guys for sure. 😁
    It ainít over till the fat lady sings.
    uneducated and low information
    I'll wager you a PF dollarô 😎
    He needed a healthy dose of bonded bullets. LSP552

  2. #162
    I jest went googling - Dewalt came out with 14.4V stuff in 1994. I have two of their 12V drills that predate that and are still going strong ... a little beat up on the outside, but then I'm showing a little wear as well. I know the original batteries died somewhere along the way, and I got two replacements. One of those died, so I just got two more replacement ones off Amazon for $37:

    https://amazon.com/gp/product/B07FVT97S9

    Those are aftermarket - Dewalt still sells originals for $109, but the replacements work as well as OEM, or at least the couple I bought years ago have been fine. That might be something to think about for cordless tools ... buy one that uses a really common battery, so you'll be able to get aftermarket batteries 30 years later.

    In any event, in 30 plus or minus years I have spent under a hundred bucks on replacement batteries, and am probably set for another 10 years. That works out to two and a half bucks a year for the convenience of cordless. Just call me the last of the big time spenders :-)

  3. #163
    Site Supporter holmes168's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    Now that I've got a decent tool chest, I'm tired of my mishmash of tools. I'm leaning towards Wiha for my first decent set of screwdrivers. Not worth it? Worth it? Spend money elsewhere?
    Ordered the 12 piece set this afternoon.
    This country needs an enema- Blues approved sig line

  4. #164
    Site Supporter
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    Feb 2011
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    Midwest
    T.O.M.= Tool of the Month

    Dec - Estwing Hatchet

    Jan - Milton S-921 Made in USA Tire Air Gauge
    I am not your attorney. I am not giving legal advice. Any and all opinions expressed are personal and my own and are not those of any employer-past, present or future.

  5. #165
    Site Supporter rob_s's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whomever View Post
    I jest went googling - Dewalt came out with 14.4V stuff in 1994. I have two of their 12V drills that predate that and are still going strong ... a little beat up on the outside, but then I'm showing a little wear as well. I know the original batteries died somewhere along the way, and I got two replacements. One of those died, so I just got two more replacement ones off Amazon for $37:

    https://amazon.com/gp/product/B07FVT97S9

    Those are aftermarket - Dewalt still sells originals for $109, but the replacements work as well as OEM, or at least the couple I bought years ago have been fine. That might be something to think about for cordless tools ... buy one that uses a really common battery, so you'll be able to get aftermarket batteries 30 years later.

    In any event, in 30 plus or minus years I have spent under a hundred bucks on replacement batteries, and am probably set for another 10 years. That works out to two and a half bucks a year for the convenience of cordless. Just call me the last of the big time spenders :-)
    I find that the ďgive me mah cords!l crowd tends to break down into two groups
    1) boomers
    2) hipsters

    Who knew that corded tools would become cool enough to be ďretroĒ.

    I have a friend/neighbor/co-worker that kept buying corded shit. The more he did, and the more I told him not to, the more entrenched he got and the more he doubled-down on that stupid shit.

    A couple months back he bought something, I donít recall what it was, and when I later asked him how he liked it, he replied ďyeah, I should have gotten the cordlessĒ.

    I will say this, for me anyway, if Milwaukee doesnít make a cordless version (yet) and I need that tool but am unlikely to use it much, Iíll buy corded. Not having to deal with a completely different battery system on a tool Iíll rarely use, or can leave pretty much set up all the time, is a trade-off Iím willing to make.

    Iím looking at track saws now. If I was in the Dewalt ecosystem Iíd buy a cordless Dewalt version without hesitation. Since Iím not, and have no other Dewalt cordless tools, and Iím not likely to use it often, Iíll probably be getting a corded Mikita. And Iím going to keep it plugged in, or have a way to plug it in easily, and build out some storage for it on/in/under my main bench so that deploying it will be *almost* as easy as cordless.
    Does the above offend? If you have paid to be here, you can click here to put it in context.

  6. #166
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    Funny that this thread was bumped today -- tonight I'm in my unfinished basement hanging some LED light strips. At first I'm just using a screwdriver because the brackets are small enough, I figure it's not worth getting a drill. I only have a corded drill, and I literally was thinking of this thread as I struggled trying to use the screwdriver vs. drilling pilot holes. I struggled with the screwdriver longer than I should've, because getting the corded drill out seemed like it would be too much of a hassle. I was thinking, dang I really should have a cordless drill for little stuff like this. In the end I broke down and broke out the corded drill to make eensy weensy pilot holes.

  7. #167
    Site Supporter EricM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob_s View Post
    Iím looking at track saws now. If I was in the Dewalt ecosystem Iíd buy a cordless Dewalt version without hesitation. Since Iím not, and have no other Dewalt cordless tools, and Iím not likely to use it often, Iíll probably be getting a corded Mikita. And Iím going to keep it plugged in, or have a way to plug it in easily, and build out some storage for it on/in/under my main bench so that deploying it will be *almost* as easy as cordless.
    We sure seem to have similar taste in tools...

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    I actually have a couple Flexvolt outdoor tools (trimmer and blower) and considered the Dewalt, but still opted for the Makita. I liked that the Makita was compatible with accessories designed for Festool tracks and (being corded) I could use it with my iVAC sensor. Makita has a nifty Bluetooth feature on their cordless track saw to activate a vac but I already had the iVAC and figured if I'm running a vacuum hose then a power cord isn't a big deal. I bought two 118" tracks and cut one in two because I preferred different lengths than they offered in shorter tracks. The tracks were drop shipped from Makita and delivered freight nicely crated. Both were flat and straight, though the part of the rail where the saw aligns to the track is just slightly different in width between the two so I adjust the saw going between tracks to take out the slop (might not truly be necessary, but I'm picky like that). While it would be nice if it had an outside splinter guard, I think Festool is the only brand that has that...some day I'll get around to making one. Overall I've been really happy with it and would have no problem recommending it.

  8. #168
    HAS ELECTROLYTES LittleLebowski's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chain View Post
    Funny that this thread was bumped today -- tonight I'm in my unfinished basement hanging some LED light strips. At first I'm just using a screwdriver because the brackets are small enough, I figure it's not worth getting a drill. I only have a corded drill, and I literally was thinking of this thread as I struggled trying to use the screwdriver vs. drilling pilot holes. I struggled with the screwdriver longer than I should've, because getting the corded drill out seemed like it would be too much of a hassle. I was thinking, dang I really should have a cordless drill for little stuff like this. In the end I broke down and broke out the corded drill to make eensy weensy pilot holes.
    I have found that I can get nearly everything done with a cordless impact driver and the Bosch set of bits I bought.
    #RESIST

  9. #169
    Site Supporter holmes168's Avatar
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    in the last couple weeks- i have had multiple chances to use my new Wiha drivers and am happy to report- they are excellent. thanks LL and PF.
    This country needs an enema- Blues approved sig line

  10. #170
    I seldom get to use it, but when I do, I'm always blown away with the quality of German made Knipex Mini Bolt Cutters:



    Size of a pair of pliers, but can cut through 1/4" mild steel and ~1/8" hardened steel. Perfect for nails, chain link fences, small luggage padlocks, fish hooks, and general wire cutting.

    Things so nice it makes me wish I was a burglar so I could use it more often

    You want the spring loaded option that auto-opens with the padded handles:



    https://www.amazon.com/KNIPEX-Tools-...dp/B005EXO81K/

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