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Thread: Glockstore Black Yikes Connector

  1. #11
    Wag more, Bark less RJ's Avatar
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    Jan 2014
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    @Eyesquared thanks, appreciate the perspective. My G19.5 is currently stock, less a 5.0 lb Wolff striker spring and extended OEM mag release.

    I’m currently on a 4 week mini-program based on Dryfire Reloaded before my next local match 11/22. Should be interesting to see how that goes, with my first no-kidding dedicated program.

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    Character is doing the right thing when nobody's looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that's right is to get by, and the only thing that's wrong is to get caught.
    — J. C. Watts

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Eyesquared View Post
    In my view the connector of a Glock doesn't have a huge amount to do with your ability to split fast. It mostly takes learning to keep your strong hand relaxed enough to move the trigger finger quickly. Other than consciously knowing how hard to grip, getting this right in live fire comes with getting rounds downrange. This time last year I was in C class, and I couldn't get my trigger finger to split faster than 0.22-0.24 no matter what I did, even if it was just trying to rip rounds into a berm. Without putting any specific training into trying to split faster, I'm now splitting a more standard 0.16-0.18s on close targets, which I credit to learning what grip pressures I need (both firing hand and support hand) and reinforcing that in live fire. Not that this matters much at most matches but on something like a Bill Drill it's good for ~0.3s saved.

    For prep and press kind of shooting I don't think that makes that much sense in USPSA either, and I don't think it is that useful of a technique for shooting a Glock. In my view prepping mostly matters when you have a trigger with a lot of heavy takeup, which makes it harder to pull through the whole travel of the trigger without moving the gun. By prepping and then pressing you get to get through the pretravel(and resultant gun movement), then refine your sight picture before breaking a shot. As a practical matter, if you're splitting semi quickly, you don't really have any time to refine your sight picture between the prep and press, which makes the end result effectively the same as trying to pull through the trigger with 1 continuous motion. For the Glock I think it's even less useful simply because the takeup is relatively light compared to the wall and the wall has such a rolling break, I personally see the gun move much more at the break than while pulling through pretravel. In other words by prepping you negate the part of the trigger pull that wasn't that hard to begin with and are still left with the part that you need to really get right to shoot the Glock straight.
    Prep and press makes a TON of sense in USPSA shooting... what else are you doing with the dead time between shots and transitions? Not every shot will be but all but the most hoser stuff you can break the shot quicker in transition - and ESPECIALLY to steel.

    Learning controlled trigger slapping is great - learning to reset and prep in transition is your next step to tightening up on points and transition in IG a little faster


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by THeHumbleMarksman View Post
    Prep and press makes a TON of sense in USPSA shooting... what else are you doing with the dead time between shots and transitions? Not every shot will be but all but the most hoser stuff you can break the shot quicker in transition - and ESPECIALLY to steel.

    Learning controlled trigger slapping is great - learning to reset and prep in transition is your next step to tightening up on points and transition in IG a little faster


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I've heard the arguments in favor of prepping but I haven't really found it to make a noticeable difference in execution. That might be a function of the gun I'm shooting also, as my X5 Legion has a very mushy rolling break rather than a defined wall. To be clear, I'm not just waiting for the gun to get on target and then smashing the trigger. When I look at my video, between shots, I am basically resetting and getting back on the trigger ASAP, and then as the dot starts to return to the target, I am applying progressively more pressure to the trigger, and the timing is such that I break the shot when the dot returns to my intended point of aim. So if you're looking at me shoot, it'll still look like prepping, and the timing will be similar to prepping, but I'm not deliberately stopping the pull, and then consciously choosing to press through the wall, if that makes any sense. Instead I'm just steadily pulling when the gun is nearly on target and steering the gun and managing the sights as I pull. I haven't taken any slow motion video of what exactly my trigger finger is doing on transitions so it may very well be that I'm starting to press the trigger before the gun is fully on target, but I still think it's better to just steadily press through the trigger with a continuously increasing poundage rather than prep to the wall and then press through after confirming a sight picture.

    This is all more or less based on what I've gotten out of Ben and Hwansik's material and both of those guys are pretty adamantly anti-prepping. I know there are others that are pro-prepping but from looking at what people's trigger fingers are doing on video I am always hard pressed to see the functional difference between steadily increasing pressure vs prepping and pressing when people are shooting anything closer than 20-25 yard shots.
    Last edited by Eyesquared; 11-01-2020 at 01:36 AM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Eyesquared View Post


    This is all more or less based on what I've gotten out of Ben and Hwansik's material and both of those guys are pretty adamantly anti-prepping. I know there are others that are pro-prepping but from looking at what people's trigger fingers are doing on video I am always hard pressed to see the functional difference between steadily increasing pressure vs prepping and pressing when people are shooting anything closer than 20-25 yard shots.
    Not only it is hard to see the difference but sometimes it goes do as I say, not as I do. I am aware of trainers who teach prep in classes but in private admit to not prepping anything out to 10 yards.


    I often times resort to just listening to people who I hold as authorities to save my time. This particular subject I actually spent some time figuring out for myself this summer. With Shadow 2 my time to prep a trigger and break a shot is in high 30s to mid 40s. Mostly 0.38 - 0.44. Subsequently, I started to incorporate that knowledge into my shooting, trying to program a trigger prep when I expected split or transition be around 0.4 or more, and not prep on everything else. Practically it was really hard to do on splits so I abandoned that in favor of Ben's approach. However, I think this has merit on wide / slow transitions so I'll be working / testing more on that.
    A plate rack is a convenient way to play with this, shooting it in a variety of ways.
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  5. #15
    Wag more, Bark less RJ's Avatar
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    Jan 2014
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    Connector arrived, will post my experience in my Training Journal.

    https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....=1#post1135544

    As advertised, there's no wall to speak of, just a press through to the release of the striker. Kinda like a LEM, in a way. Interesting.

    Old (dot) connector on top, new (Black Yikes) on the bottom:

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    Character is doing the right thing when nobody's looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that's right is to get by, and the only thing that's wrong is to get caught.
    — J. C. Watts

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