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Thread: Does anyone have some great trigger control drills?

  1. #21
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Dryfire trigger presses on targets of varying difficulty is a drill I do regularly. I'm paying attention to the wobble of the sights before the press, and to any disturbance of the sights during the press.

    But, @feudist let's back up and hear what your motivation is for working on your trigger press. Do you have a specific problem? Or just want to improve this part of your shooting?

    In many cases, "misses" are not caused by a "bad" trigger press, but a lot people think they are.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  2. #22
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    Besure to watch entire video. Especially the explanation of why the wall at end.


  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Dryfire trigger presses on targets of varying difficulty is a drill I do regularly. I'm paying attention to the wobble of the sights before the press, and to any disturbance of the sights during the press.

    But, @feudist let's back up and hear what your motivation is for working on your trigger press. Do you have a specific problem? Or just want to improve this part of your shooting?

    In many cases, "misses" are not caused by a "bad" trigger press, but a lot people think they are.
    Left handed, Glock 19 with a long rolling trigger: I'm seeing a lot of hits to the left of the target(opposite of the usual Glock trigger error) at 7 yards on in

    rapid fire drills like Doubles, Bills and Hammers.

    Aside from that? Your sigline says it all.

    @scw2, thanks for those links!

  4. #24
    Zamboni operator snow white's Avatar
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    Comming from shooting da/sa guns my whole life to now just starting to shoot glocks, the glock trigger is a cake walk. Are there any da/ sa guns with the same grip angle as the glock? If so That would be a fantastic training aid.
    Come, mother, come! For terror is thy name, death is in thy breath, and every shaking step destroys a world for e'er. Thou 'time', the all-destroyer! Come, O mother, come!

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by RJ View Post
    In case it helps: My AMG Labs Commander timer will indeed pick up dry trigger presses on my Glock 19. I have a "dry practice" preset profile with the sensitivity set to the highest possible value.

    https://www.amg-lab.com/
    That looks like all that and a bag of chips.

    And...I ordered one.

  6. #26
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by feudist View Post
    Left handed, Glock 19 with a long rolling trigger: I'm seeing a lot of hits to the left of the target(opposite of the usual Glock trigger error) at 7 yards on in

    rapid fire drills like Doubles, Bills and Hammers.

    Aside from that? Your sigline says it all.
    "Rapid fire drills like Doubles, Bills and Hammers". I guessed that was part of it. In my experience, pushing down on the gun as or just before it fires is a vastly more common reason for misses, unless you're going for small, far targets. This is especially true when timing the gun, and trying to shoot fast splits. When I push, it's often from the support hand side, probably because of the greater grip pressure causing tension on that side.

    I really need to change my sigline to: You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on not pushing the gun down before it fires. GM-level shooters still deal with this, because you have to return the gun after it fires and when you're trying to time this for fast splits, sometimes the timing is off.

    Once you can tell whenever you're pushing down on the gun, you can begin solving the problem. I like using high-speed video to diagnose, and Hwansik's Measurement Drill is a good way to get that under control.

    Here's something I wrote in another post:
    There are many reasons for a miss, and only one of them is trigger mechanics:

    1. Trigger mechanics: trigger pull moves sights off target
    2a. Recoil control: arms move sights off target in an attempt to control recoil
    2b. Recoil timing: you attempt to time the recoil cycle of the gun, but press the trigger at the wrong time.
    3a. Transition timing: you pull off the target before the gun is finished shooting it, or shoot before the gun has arrived on target
    3b. Transition damping: your transition wasn't 'critically damped', and you overshoot the target.
    4a. Sight alignment: sights misaligned
    4b. Sight placement: sights aligned but aimed wrong (usually looking at the wrong place on the target)
    5. Vision: focus or eye dominance. Looking at the sights through the wrong eye.
    Last edited by Clusterfrack; 09-24-2020 at 10:48 AM.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  7. #27
    Romanes eunt domus RJ's Avatar
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    Excellent thread. Tried three of these today in a quick 20" session with my AMG Commander, Glock 48, and a dime I stole borrowed from my wife's wallet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelD View Post
    It seems to me the Wall Drill (https://pistol-training.com/drills/wall-drill) would be good for trigger control.
    Great fundamental drill. Focus on grip, and the front sight, and a clean press, nothing else. Really makes you target the front sight, as there's nothing else to look at.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    Balancing a penny on the front sight (easier with a partner) and pressing the trigger without disturbing the coin.

    Simple, but effective.
    Yeah so this is something I've done, most recently in Mr Givens class. But it's still hard, and makes you focus on the fundamentals. I did 10/10, but it does get tedious without a partner.

    Quote Originally Posted by YVK View Post
    Eyesquared did describe it in post #6, it is a an aimed drill (unlike the wall drill) where you aim at the spot, and pull an unprepped trigger as soon as you hear the beep. The goal is to finish the press before the beep ends without disturbing the sights. An add-on element is to press the trigger with an excessive force (give or take twice the trigger poundage) because that's what often happens in rapid fire. People tend to slam triggers back hard. It is done single action, double action, and I found it to be very challenging one handed.
    Very good drill. I had to slow down the random start interval on my timer to allow me some time to get the gun out before the BEEP.

    THANKS ALL! Very useful thread.
    "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same." --Ronald Reagan. USPSA#92555

  8. #28
    I'll add one additional recommendation if you're willing to spend the money, and that is the usage of a SIRT pistol. I've found it to be a fantastic addition to my dry-fire routine. Depending on your goals, you may eventually want to challenge your ability to very quickly press the trigger on a target as soon as you acquire it. A SIRT or other such type of setup lets you know for sure whether or not you were able to keep your sights on the target when you broke the shot. It of course removes recoil and the blast of the shot from the equation while leaving most everything else fairly close to ideal, depending on what you're shooting.

    I've discovered with a SIRT that I'm able to draw and hit small targets at distance with almost the same trigger press that I'd use for a close-up hoser. In other words, I can "jerk the trigger" at speed and distance and still hit what I need to hit. Thus, speaking for me only, it's not due to poor trigger control that I often miss but rather more likely it's the result of introducing something else like a sympathetic squeeze or pre-ignition push. That was a light-bulb moment for me...

  9. #29
    Romanes eunt domus RJ's Avatar
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    Aha, I thought of one additional comment. Toward the goal of "seeing" the front sight during Dry Practice, sometimes I wear a pair of +1.5 diopter full lens safety glasses to help me see what's going on:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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    And in addition to these, I also put on a simple AAA headlight to actually illuminate the sight. Many examples abound, here's one on Amazon:

    https://www.amazon.com/Petzl-Tikka-H...44&s=hi&sr=1-5

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    I find using both in combination is quite helpful in Dry Practice to see the front sight.
    "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same." --Ronald Reagan. USPSA#92555

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    "Rapid fire drills like Doubles, Bills and Hammers". I guessed that was part of it. In my experience, pushing down on the gun as or just before it fires is a vastly more common reason for misses, unless you're going for small, far targets. This is especially true when timing the gun, and trying to shoot fast splits. When I push, it's often from the support hand side, probably because of the greater grip pressure causing tension on that side.

    I really need to change my sigline to: You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on not pushing the gun down before it fires. GM-level shooters still deal with this, because you have to return the gun after it fires and when you're trying to time this for fast splits, sometimes the timing is off.

    Once you can tell whenever you're pushing down on the gun, you can begin solving the problem. I like using high-speed video to diagnose, and Hwansik's Measurement Drill is a good way to get that under control.

    Here's something I wrote in another post:
    There are many reasons for a miss, and only one of them is trigger mechanics:

    1. Trigger mechanics: trigger pull moves sights off target
    2a. Recoil control: arms move sights off target in an attempt to control recoil
    2b. Recoil timing: you attempt to time the recoil cycle of the gun, but press the trigger at the wrong time.
    3a. Transition timing: you pull off the target before the gun is finished shooting it, or shoot before the gun has arrived on target
    3b. Transition damping: your transition wasn't 'critically damped', and you overshoot the target.
    4a. Sight alignment: sights misaligned
    4b. Sight placement: sights aligned but aimed wrong (usually looking at the wrong place on the target)
    5. Vision: focus or eye dominance. Looking at the sights through the wrong eye.

    Good info. Perhaps I'm over gripping with my support hand?

    However, I'm not pushing down. All shots are in the 2000-2200 area , from vertical midline of the target out to the D-zone. Even all A hits are predominantly left.

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