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Thread: Suggestions for getting into mid range in DFW?

  1. #1

    Suggestions for getting into mid range in DFW?

    I'm looking to try my hand at 500-600 yards and need a recommendation on a local (within a couple hours of DFW) range and training. Wouldn't mind some suggestions on an entry rig to learn on. I've got AR lowers so a 6.5 Grendel or 224 Valkyrie seems an easy option although a bolt gun in something else could work. Open to suggestions on location and gear.

    I have a shitty neck so recoil is something I'd like to minimize. I stare at spreadsheets quite a but so avoiding math would also be desirable.

    Other option, get a Tikka T1X and hit DPC during the week while everyone else is on zoom calls. Still need some guidance here though.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    DFW
    Triple C range in Cresson maybe a good fit
    For you. Just 59 miles away. They have ranges out to 2K.

    https://www.triplecrange.com


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  3. #3
    .223 bolt. Recall when the Army Marksmanship Unit showed up at Camp Perry with M16s with heavy bullets and spanked the Marines armed with M14s.

  4. #4
    Thanks for the recommendations.

  5. #5
    Site Supporter David S.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    DFW
    How much "training" do you need, vs opportunity?

    I attended a Tiger Valley course east of Waco. Write up here. As I stated in the review, based on my experience with him vs quite a few handgun instructors, I would not recommend him for a rank newbie like I was to carbines. There was little to no instruction of any of mechanics (holdover, offset, malfunctions, positional shooting, etc). I kinda figured it out as we went along.

    He's a smart dude. He's been there done that, and was recommended by Dobbs and Bolke. He just wasn't what I needed at the time.

    If you're after a mid-range course, I assume you likely have those worked out. If so, you might find his course useful. You'll certainly get to shoot a variety of steel at the desired ranges. Things SEEM slow for him. I don't know, but you may be able to book him for private lessons for normal tuition price.

    Cheers,
    David S

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jackdog View Post
    Triple C range in Cresson maybe a good fit
    For you. Just 59 miles away. They have ranges out to 2K.

    https://www.triplecrange.com


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    This.

  7. #7
    For starters, you might check out Ryan Cleckner's Long Range Shooting Handbook: The Complete Beginner's Guide to Precision Rifle Shooting (PF affiliate link). I've not read it myself, but it's an oft-recommended title that covers a lot of the basics.

    Cartridge: .223 will certainly get you to 500-600 yards without a problem, especially if you want to avoid recoil stressing your neck. I would simply make sure that the barrel I selected was capable of stabilizing 69+ grain bullets out to the distances you want to shoot. There are a couple guys in PRS using .223, but the primary reason you don't see more isn't the ballistics of the cartridge, but the fact that hit scoring is dependent on the impact being observed, and .223/5.56 doesn't make a terribly visible impact. If you decide to get deeper into it later, there are a host of 6mm cartridges that would work great for you, but for now, you don't need the expense, the hassle of sourcing or making brass, or the barrel consumption.

    Gun: I think that a good AR upper will certainly get you there, but I also think it will be more expensive than a dedicated bolt gun. In my opinion, you would do well to choose between either using an AR-15 upper you already have, or buying/borrowing an entry-level bolt gun that will cost the same or less than a dedicated AR upper. A heavy/varmint-barreled Howa 1500 or Savage 10 will serve you quite well. Cabela's and others carry exclusive entry-level Savage 10 rifles (like the Savage 12FV) for $400 or under, and sometimes far less. The Ruger American Predator is an excellent option (and it takes AR magazines!), but options for upgrading the stock are limited. In any case, a .223 is very comfortable to shoot with a varmint profile barrel.

    Personally, though, don't do the dumb shit I did: if you decide you want a rifle in a nice chassis, don't stick your budget action in it. Just pony up for a custom action.

    Protect Ya Neck: Pay a lot of attention to how you set up your shooting position. You don't want to have to move your neck out of its natural position--no craning, stooping, tucking forward, etc. Get in position, seated or prone, and then make the rifle fit you. If the range has benches, bring some cushions to adjust your seating height. I would also suggest looking into free-recoil shooting. Most guys use the hard-hold technique, where the rifle butt directly contacts your shoulder and you pull the rifle straight back--easy on the shoulder, but it can be jarring on your neck. In free-recoil, the rifle is positioned on a sliding bipod+rear bag, or front and rear bags (and optionally, bag riders). Only your trigger finger actually contacts the rifle, and upon firing, the rifle is allowed to slide backwards and you catch it with your shoulder. It's maybe a little tougher on the shoulder, but very easy on your neck. Excellent groups can be achieved with either technique.

  8. #8
    Site Supporter SeriousStudent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Texas
    Quote Originally Posted by Oukaapie View Post
    I'm looking to try my hand at 500-600 yards and need a recommendation on a local (within a couple hours of DFW) range and training. Wouldn't mind some suggestions on an entry rig to learn on. I've got AR lowers so a 6.5 Grendel or 224 Valkyrie seems an easy option although a bolt gun in something else could work. Open to suggestions on location and gear.

    I have a shitty neck so recoil is something I'd like to minimize. I stare at spreadsheets quite a but so avoiding math would also be desirable.

    Other option, get a Tikka T1X and hit DPC during the week while everyone else is on zoom calls. Still need some guidance here though.
    I may have a few rimfire rifles that could assist.......

    CZ 455 Tacticool (suppressed with nice glass) and a very sweet old Kimber 82 Government with iron sights that won some competitions back in the day.

    It's more fun to do trigger work while someone else looks through the big glass thingie and suggests wind calls.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Eastern NC, 500 feet and below
    Quote Originally Posted by Wise_A View Post
    For starters, you might check out Ryan Cleckner's Long Range Shooting Handbook: The Complete Beginner's Guide to Precision Rifle Shooting (PF affiliate link). I've not read it myself, but it's an oft-recommended title that covers a lot of the basics.




    Personally, though, don't do the dumb shit I did: if you decide you want a rifle in a nice chassis, don't stick your budget action in it. Just pony up for a custom action.

    .
    Honest question: I usually advise new long range guys wanting a chassis setup to spend their budget like this. Mostly on a good optic, decent chassis, non-shit barrels, then action. I think itís a great idea to forego the custom action and use the extra money on a better optic and higher quality ammunition or class. In fact, a custom action is usually a last expense for me. Again, honestly wondering why you think a budget action in a good chassis is a dumb idea?

    And quoted the link to promote a very informative book.

  10. #10
    So thereís a guy that does private lessons on a private range about an hour East of Dallas that would be a good option. Itís one on one for a whole day and he can tailor the curriculum to your needs and goals. I consistently see positive feedback about his training on Texas Hunting Forum. And Iím pretty sure you can use his equipment for the course if you donít have your own stuff yet. Will get contact info and follow up.

    Regarding ARís: for 600 yards get a Grendel and call it good. However, a word of warning... itís harder to shoot an AR well. All the reciprocating mass will exploit any weaknesses you have in fundamentals and magnify them. Physical limitations aside, I think itís better to learn long range marksmanship on a bolt. A 10+ pound rifle with a 3 port PVA brake and 6 Creedmoor or 120 6.5 Creedmoor is a pussycat for recoil.


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