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Thread: Is pistol shooting with one hand good practice?

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Iím going to be a dissenting voice here. While it is good to be able to shoot well SHO and WHO, training heavily one handed isnít the magic that will take you to the next level. If one hand yielded great skill advancement, everyone would be doing it. The current top USPSA shooters didnít get good by focusing even 10% on one handed skills.

    Just because itís hard doesnít mean itís going to make you better faster.

    I think it is better to train freestyle, diagnose your shortcomings, and focus on that for the majority of your time. SHO/WHO? Maybe 5%, unless you have a mission specific reason for that type of shooting. In my experience, freestyle skills transfer well to SHO/WHO.
    For shooting USPSA field courses, I agree that practicing one hand shooting is not a good investment. However for classifiers, having strong one hand shooting skills is a good way to harvest strong scores.

    Gaming aside, I think there is a lot of one hand shooting in real world defensive shooting.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  2. #32
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    For shooting USPSA field courses, I agree that practicing one hand shooting is not a good investment. However for classifiers, having strong one hand shooting skills is a good way to harvest strong scores.

    Gaming aside, I think there is a lot of one hand shooting in real world defensive shooting.
    Totally agree. Iím feeling very good about my SHO/WHO skills currently, but the vast majority of my training hasnít been on that. In fact, the way I got better at WHO was by shooting weak hand supported.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You donít really graduate from certain problems or certain thingsÖ like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  3. #33
    People who rove around with their toddlers will usually scoop the little one up immediately when any type of threatening situation is developing. That, to me, made one hand practice a regular thing. I can drop a bag of groceries but the little one is going to be in my left arm.

    Any wrestler that's had a stinger in the shoulder that last for a few seconds or more, knows it's good to be able to survive with only one fully functioning arm, at least short term.

  4. #34
    Site Supporter Rex G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    For shooting USPSA field courses, I agree that practicing one hand shooting is not a good investment. However for classifiers, having strong one hand shooting skills is a good way to harvest strong scores.

    Gaming aside, I think there is a lot of one hand shooting in real world defensive shooting.
    This. Nothing wrong with competition, but I (presently*) carry handguns for defensive of myself, and those folks important to me. My support hand may well have other, urgent things to do, like toss a distracting object toward an adversaryís eyes, hold one of my often-carried Surefire lights, hold a dog leash, or, push or pull a family member to a safer position. My most comfortable-est Comfort Gun is a GP100, with the original-pattern factory grip. I am no Thor, but the GP100 is my hammer.

    I place a priority on carrying handguns, rather than handS-guns. I retired the last of my handS-guns in 2015, when I was able to switch from my long-time P229 duty pistol, to a Gen4 G17, for police duty. (I switched to 9mm, from .40, for less muzzle flip, at this same time.) The lower-volume form factor of the Gen4 was So. Very. Welcome. I was able to shoot the P229 was well as any auto-loader I had ever handled, and very nearly as well as a GP100/K-/L-Frame, but that wide-body frame resulted in a less-secure grip than I wanted, when my support hand had to be somewhere other than on the weapon. (Due to duty pistol rules, I was not able to resume carrying a single-stack duty pistol until 2016, when an outgoing chief re-authorized the 1911.)

    *I have not shot in any kind of match since 1990 or 1991. (IPSC-like, but with use of cover being mandated at particular positions, as one moved along, at the now-defunct Houston PD Downtown pistol range, under the Capital/Rusk bridges.) I remember the time period, because that was while I was using a Colt Stainless Commander as a duty pistol; the 1911 was the favored auto-pistol system, among HPD officers, in those days.
    Retaríd LE

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  5. #35
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    I could have been more to-the-point in my posts. Here's what I'm saying: if the goal is to get good at one-handed shooting, you need to:

    -Aim/index the gun (harder single-handed)
    -Confirm alignment as needed for target difficulty
    -Press the trigger straight back
    -Not disturb alignment by pushing down on the gun as it fires (often the reason people miss single-handed)
    -Not disturb alignment by moving the gun as a side effect of your trigger pull
    -Observe the gun as it recoils to confirm the shot
    -Return the gun to the target or move it to the next target (harder single-handed)

    Note that these are exactly the same things that you need to do to get good at freestyle shooting. Only a subset of these needs to be practiced SHO/WHO, and freestyle is a better way to practice the rest of the skillset.

    So, my approach is to work on my shooting in general, and spend maybe 5% on single-handed shooting unless a drill requires SHO/WHO, like a low light drill with a flashlight.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You donít really graduate from certain problems or certain thingsÖ like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  6. #36
    Member randyflycaster's Avatar
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    I am amazed: When I shoot my Ruger LCP .22 with one hand there is so much recoil. My shots are going way to the right. (I shoot left handed.) Not sure how to control the recoil with one hand.

    Randy

  7. #37
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyflycaster View Post
    I am amazed: When I shoot my Ruger LCP .22 with one hand there is so much recoil. My shots are going way to the right. (I shoot left handed.) Not sure how to control the recoil with one hand.
    There are two things going on here:

    1. Your shots aren't hitting the center of your target area
    2. The recoil is exaggerated

    While there can be a small deviation in POI when the gun is in free recoil (very weak grip), that's not why your shots aren't going where you're aiming. I'm guessing it's a combination of:

    --Trigger mechanics: trigger pull moves sights off target
    --Recoil control: arm moves sights off target in an attempt to control recoil

    I suggest you don't try to control recoil. When you shoot it with one hand, the gun is going to do weird things anyway, so just deal with it. Press the trigger straight back, let the gun recoil, and watch what the sights do during the whole process. If you're pushing down on the gun, or wanking the trigger, hopefully you can diagnose this by watching carefully. Mouseguns are hard to shoot with two hands, let alone one.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You donít really graduate from certain problems or certain thingsÖ like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Gaming aside, I think there is a lot of one hand shooting in real world defensive shooting.
    Coming from the police world, I believe this is true, largely if the officer is caught by surprise and coming from behind, so to speak. Patrol car video on t-stops seems to bear this out.

    Another aspect to be considered is level of training and practice. I would probably be less likely to shoot SHO from the holster when caught by surprise than an officer with less than 5,000 total rounds fired under their belt.

    You could hypothesize the same would be true across the CCW world.

    Don't get me started about the overly complex married-hand flashlight techniques taught to LE.

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