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Thread: The Case for a 20" Shotgun, No Side Saddle, Non-Flite Control Buck

  1. #31
    Old man yelling at cloud OlongJohnson's Avatar
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    It's physics. The slug can't push on the target any harder than the gun pushes on the shooter. If the shooter isn't knocked over, no reason to think the target will be.
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    Not another dime.

  2. #32
    Moderator BehindBlueI's's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    I'm pretty sure you'd fall.
    Quote Originally Posted by OlongJohnson View Post
    It's physics. The slug can't push on the target any harder than the gun pushes on the shooter. If the shooter isn't knocked over, no reason to think the target will be.
    This. The projectile can't gain energy as it flies, and the only difference is the rate at which the energy is applied at either end. I think "impulse" is the correct term for that, but it's been a long time since physics.

    Factor in the fact we aren't rigid non-reactive targets as well. We are a composite of hinges, swivels, and assorted squishy materials that absorb incoming energy. We actively attempt to not fall down. You can take a hell of a punch to the chest without being knocked down, something you're weighted targets probably wouldn't fare well with, for those reasons.
    L'otters are not afraid.
    WWOMJD?

    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    Maybe with talented students I would lube up with baby oil and then go at it.

  3. #33
    Member SecondsCount's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Which brings up the biggest difference. It isn’t the number of rounds, the length of the barrel, or the type buck. It is pump vs semi-auto. Running a pump requires two hands and regular practice. I dragged out a Benelli pump a month ago, and I was like a monkey humping a football trying to run it.
    I've taken one shotgun class in my life, with an M1 Benelli. It ran 100% with everything I ran in the class...birdshot, #4 and 00 buck, and slugs. The only malfunctions that I saw on the class were students short stroking their pump shotguns.
    -Seconds Count. Misses Don't-

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by SecondsCount View Post
    I've taken one shotgun class in my life, with an M1 Benelli. It ran 100% with everything I ran in the class...birdshot, #4 and 00 buck, and slugs. The only malfunctions that I saw on the class were students short stroking their pump shotguns.
    With SouthNarc commenting in this thread, I would obviously defer to him, but in my experience malfunctions with pump guns are generally operator error, and malfunctions with semi-auto shotguns are gun problems.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  5. #35
    Site Supporter Nephrology's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Which brings up the biggest difference. It isn’t the number of rounds, the length of the barrel, or the type buck. It is pump vs semi-auto. Running a pump requires two hands and regular practice. I dragged out a Benelli pump a month ago, and I was like a monkey humping a football trying to run it.
    Yeah, I have come around to this line of thinking. I have a 18" Police Magnum with a SF fore-end that I keep around but frankly have no business owning. I don't practice with it regularly or particularly enjoy shooting it. My 11.5" SBR, while undoubtedly way louder, is also a gun I know I am much more effective with. A pistol likewise.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    With SouthNarc commenting in this thread, I would obviously defer to him, but in my experience malfunctions with pump guns are generally operator error, and malfunctions with semi-auto shotguns are gun problems.
    Ditto. I guess the nuance I'd add to that is people trying to run a semi with ammo that is poorly matched to the gun, typically lower powered low brass birdshot in a gun that wants to see something stouter.

    Not sure if that's a gun problem or an operator problem, but it's a Thing.
    I was into 10mm Auto before it sold out and went mainstream, but these days I'm here for the revolver and epidemiology information.

  7. #37
    Site Supporter SeriousStudent's Avatar
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    My fave house shotgun is a 12.5" 870 Wingmaster SBS with a +1 Wilson mag extension.

    Easily maneuvered and operated - DB approved.

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  8. #38
    Old man yelling at cloud OlongJohnson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lester Polfus View Post
    Ditto. I guess the nuance I'd add to that is people trying to run a semi with ammo that is poorly matched to the gun, typically lower powered low brass birdshot in a gun that wants to see something stouter.
    One nice thing about the 1301's gas system is it basically has a gas pressure regulator built in. So it's ported to cycle with weak ammo and just vents the excess gas when you load it with stouter rounds.
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    Not another dime.

  9. #39
    Moderator BehindBlueI's's Avatar
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    The only semi-auto shotgun I own, or have ever owned, is an old Ted Williams. It's sat in the safe for years and ran just lovely to shoot some clays last year but I did lube it up first. How well do the semis tolerate "break glass in case of fire" type owners and still run well?
    L'otters are not afraid.
    WWOMJD?

    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    Maybe with talented students I would lube up with baby oil and then go at it.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by BehindBlueI's View Post
    The only semi-auto shotgun I own, or have ever owned, is an old Ted Williams. It's sat in the safe for years and ran just lovely to shoot some clays last year but I did lube it up first. How well do the semis tolerate "break glass in case of fire" type owners and still run well?
    “Semi” describes a wide range of shotguns. A Benelli or Beretta, especially with full power buck, would certainly do well — others vary.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

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