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Thread: COVID and Law Enforcement

  1. #1
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    COVID and Law Enforcement

    Many cities are responding to the COVID pandemic by reducing police response to non-life-threatening calls.

    How will this affect public safety? Will there be an uptick in petty, and maybe more serious crime?

    There is also the concern that if COVID reduces the number of officers fit for duty, even serious crimes will not be able to be investigated.

    Thoughts?
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    In your hypothetical, you could replace “police officers” with “doctors and nurses,” and replace “serious crimes” with “serious medical conditions will not be treated,” and be in the same place. Everyone is guessing, but nobody knows — it depends upon the number and seriousness of those infected. This will probably become much clearer over the next two to six weeks.

    I do know that people are hoarding 9mm and .223, just like toilet paper. A neighbor urgently contacted me yesterday for refresher training with his Glock and AR, and looking for leads on where to get ammo. In this part of Arizona where I am now, the half life of a looter would be quite short. Pro tip for criminals — if every other house is flying a Trump flag, best to pick a different neighborhood.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  3. #3
    There is a (IMO, very valid) concern that it is a question of when -- and not if -- the jails will become infected. Most modern jails are pod-based systems, so the opposite of the "social distancing" being preached. Corrections officers will get it. Court staff will get it. And on and on and on. The solution being suggested by some seems to be to reduce the number of people in jail through various means: reducing or eliminating cash bonds, plea agreements, reduced consequences for violations of probation, etc. There's plenty of criticism from the LE side of things that the justice system is a revolving door. This would effectively remove the door.

    I'm not sure where I fall on that spectrum as far as how wise that is (balancing medical needs versus public order), but I think effective non-enforcement of various crimes -- particularly property crimes -- in a time where plenty of people are about to be out of work, on drugs, with little to do is going to have far-reaching consequences.

  4. #4
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Sorry for the screwed up top post. Something weird happened when I made the thread and I didn’t catch it in time to edit.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  5. #5
    Member
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    In Massachusetts police response is emergency only, all other business conducted through phone calls or email. Most PD's are locking their front doors, no entry to the PD. No traffic stops or arrest (summons only) unless absolutely necessary.

  6. #6
    Member
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    Madison, Wisconsin
    Jails and prisons and homeless shelters and homeless encampments are health hazards under the best of times . . .

  7. #7
    Site Supporter
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    Texas
    Unless I find something else out, COVID19 is of little worry for me compared to the other things these people have. Watching TJ Hooker as a kid did not portray to me an accurate picture of the nastiness I get to encounter.


    If nothing else, hopefully this opens eyes to the health hazards that homeless camps present. As @Jeff22 said, even in the best of times.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssb View Post
    There is a (IMO, very valid) concern that it is a question of when -- and not if -- the jails will become infected. Most modern jails are pod-based systems, so the opposite of the "social distancing" being preached. Corrections officers will get it. Court staff will get it. And on and on and on. The solution being suggested by some seems to be to reduce the number of people in jail through various means: reducing or eliminating cash bonds, plea agreements, reduced consequences for violations of probation, etc. There's plenty of criticism from the LE side of things that the justice system is a revolving door. This would effectively remove the door.

    I'm not sure where I fall on that spectrum as far as how wise that is (balancing medical needs versus public order), but I think effective non-enforcement of various crimes -- particularly property crimes -- in a time where plenty of people are about to be out of work, on drugs, with little to do is going to have far-reaching consequences.

    Real food for thought. Good post.

    Jails are disgusting, and the people in them are often some of the nastiest people you can find. I actually feel bad for some inmates because while they screwed up and deserve to be there, they are not disgusting and are not the threat some of these others are.

  9. #9
    Site Supporter Suvorov's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    In your hypothetical, you could replace “police officers” with “doctors and nurses,” and replace “serious crimes” with “serious medical conditions will not be treated,” and be in the same place. Everyone is guessing, but nobody knows — it depends upon the number and seriousness of those infected. This will probably become much clearer over the next two to six weeks.

    I do know that people are hoarding 9mm and .223, just like toilet paper. A neighbor urgently contacted me yesterday for refresher training with his Glock and AR, and looking for leads on where to get ammo. In this part of Arizona where I am now, the half life of a looter would be quite short. Pro tip for criminals — if every other house is flying a Trump flag, best to pick a different neighborhood.
    One more vote for me to move to Arizona.

  10. #10
    Site Supporter deflave's Avatar
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    I wish I worked for a department or agency that told everybody to throttle back.

    Spent the last two days taking people out of houses after everybody was told to stay in their houses.

    Then we threw their ass into a gathering of "more than 250" people. AKA "jail."

    LOL.

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