Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: How often do you spar hard?

  1. #1
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois

    How often do you spar hard?

    One of my main reasons for training BJJ and kickboxing is self protection and having unarmed skills in the tool box.

    I've talked to my training partners, and one of the things we have noticed is that the guys who are at a very high level (purple/brown belts in BJJ and an equivalent experience base in striking) don't really go very hard when they spar. When they do stand-up, they are going maybe just a smidge harder than touch sparring. But they aren't the kinda guys and gals to bite into their mouthpiece and start swinging hard.

    Similarly, when they do BJJ sparring, they're mostly just playing with the new guys, letting them work and then maybe catch a sub a little later. Sometimes when they spar with each other you'll see them turn up the intensity though.

    So, quick question...how often are you all sparring hard in BJJ or striking?


    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by 45dotACP View Post
    One of my main reasons for training BJJ and kickboxing is self protection and having unarmed skills in the tool box.

    I've talked to my training partners, and one of the things we have noticed is that the guys who are at a very high level (purple/brown belts in BJJ and an equivalent experience base in striking) don't really go very hard when they spar. When they do stand-up, they are going maybe just a smidge harder than touch sparring. But they aren't the kinda guys and gals to bite into their mouthpiece and start swinging hard.

    Similarly, when they do BJJ sparring, they're mostly just playing with the new guys, letting them work and then maybe catch a sub a little later. Sometimes when they spar with each other you'll see them turn up the intensity though.

    So, quick question...how often are you all sparring hard in BJJ or striking?


    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk


    For BJJ, I may go hard in specific rounds depending on the situation and the partner, but for the most part the only day I truly go all out is the Friday lunch time competition class. The rest of the time I am somewhere between 50% and 80%.

    For any kind of striking/FoF type stuff, I limit it to no more than 1-2 hours per month. Anymore is just wearing the body out and taking needless damage/trauma. Thai Boxers figured it out decades ago, as did BJJers - you only need a bit of the hard stuff, and most of your training is in that middle realm of intensity/effort. That goes for the elite professional fighters, so it certainly should apply to us.
    For info about training or to contact me:
    Immediate Action Combatives

  3. #3
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    I had heard something similar from guys referencing the Russian wrestlers mentioning that they placed more value on consistency and training volume as opposed to cranking up the training intensity fewer times a week.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    It depends on what you are trying to accomplish.

    If you are training to fight in MMA or boxing you have to spar pretty regularly. I put in 20+ rounds a week when I competed. The boxing rounds were heavier, maybe 80%, but we wore headgear and 16 oz gloves. The MMA rounds were about 50% to the head and 80% to the body/legs. My BJJ training was mostly me starting in a terrible position and working from there. My opponent would have top, rear, or side mount from the start. My other days would focus on wrestling or Muay Thai drills depending on my opponent and fight strategy.

    If you are training purely for self defense I wouldnít spar as much. Iím not much of a fan of play sparring either, I think it screws up your timing. Iíd do a million BJJ rolls and work wrestling takedowns, mostly. You can take any human on Earth to the ground with a good enough double/single-leg combo.

  5. #5
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Ah man, I need to work on my double leg. Keep leading with my neck and every time I wind up getting stuck in a guillotine. I like a good single leg though. And a good Judo throw if I can set it up.

    I'm not really planning to do any amateur fights at this point. Some of our guys do BJJ tournaments, Pankration, MMA or Kickboxing fights and I like to help out as a sparring partner but I probably don't have the time to devote to even the train up for a BJJ competition, let alone a MMA fight camp. Too much work stuff, some big changes coming to my personal life (in a good way) and the shooting hobby. If I did it, I'd want to do it right.

    So then it's probably best to keep on with light contact sparring with a few heavier rounds a month.

    With the BJJ I've always been the little guy, so I typically find myself working off my back a lot, but I'm getting to the point now where I'm trying to be more aggressive to try to get to the top mount.



    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Quote Originally Posted by 45dotACP View Post
    Ah man, I need to work on my double leg. Keep leading with my neck and every time I wind up getting stuck in a guillotine. I like a good single leg though. And a good Judo throw if I can set it up.

    I'm not really planning to do any amateur fights at this point. Some of our guys do BJJ tournaments, Pankration, MMA or Kickboxing fights and I like to help out as a sparring partner but I probably don't have the time to devote to even the train up for a BJJ competition, let alone a MMA fight camp. Too much work stuff, some big changes coming to my personal life (in a good way) and the shooting hobby. If I did it, I'd want to do it right.

    So then it's probably best to keep on with light contact sparring with a few heavier rounds a month.

    With the BJJ I've always been the little guy, so I typically find myself working off my back a lot, but I'm getting to the point now where I'm trying to be more aggressive to try to get to the top mount.

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk
    If you arenít all in, donít fight itís not worth it. Iíd recommend just continuing to spar a little per month and rolling as much as possible.

    Judo is great for self defense, but I didnít use it much in MMA because most of the throws can be countered by shooting a double-leg. You have to drive through them with your shoulder and an upright head position, donít lead with the crown of your head forward and your neck exposed. My main strategy for doubles was to work them close enough to the cage or wall to trap them.

    Thatís what is great about BJJ, each body shape/size has its share of advantages and disadvantages. If you are generally smaller than your sparring partner you should focus on scrambles to tire them and using leverage underneath their hips to work deep sweeps. When on top think position over submission. Wear them down slowly and work towards chokes.. If they get in the dominate position use your smaller size to scramble and force them to work. Big guys tend to fall into your guard or another top position and use it as an opportunity to rest, donít let them.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Ventura County
    Fires Zahabi did a podcast with Joe Rogan about this. His point is consistency over intensity.

  8. #8

    Going Hard

    Vary the intensity and select your training partners accordingly.

    There are some people who don't know the meaning of "slow and technical" and your training partners will dictate what kind of roll it is going to be. If you are on the ragged edge, running your A-game trying to keep up, you aren't going to be experimenting much. Going hard is necessary, but as Cecil said, it's going to beat you up. As you get older, you don't bounce back as quickly from hard training and it sucks getting sidelined with injuries... especially when you are new.

  9. #9
    Iím not sure if youíre looking for a specific answer in time or percentage but for me itís all done by feel. I usually pick 1 or 2 matches to train aggressively but the rest I am allowing myself to be put in bad positions so I can practice working out of them. I think itís a matter of what you feel you need. No different than going to the range with a plan in mind. Choose a focus for the night, then train it. Be disciplined and try not to get off track. Aggressive submissions or striking is just one piece of the puzzle and training is just that, training.

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •