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Thread: Front sight - press

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    From reading him, a lot of the latter, to include clay pigeons and jackrabbits. Not much of the former; he was very focused on making a good shot (if you can get... steadier, get steadier).

    He was also a relatively good point shooter. George or some of the others may know better, but I think you could substantiate through his writing that he believed in something very like index shooting / target focus at the level of mastery.
    You just made me remember a story about Jeff boondocking in Mexico, carrying a 1911 in .38 Super, because .45 was verboten there. Some large bird flew over, and he shot it with his 1911, which featured notably in a chapter of one of his books.

    In the Gunsite rifle class, we shot moving clay pigeons with our .308 bolt rifles. Also did that at his Whittington reunions. My proudest rifle moment was breaking two successive clay pigeons with Finn Aagard’s Mauser .30-06.

    Despite his later displeasure with IPSC, Jeff was one of the original gamers, and loved technical shooting challenges.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by GOTURBACK View Post
    Are there any tips that would help someone develop their target focus ability if they have never consciously utilized it before?
    Please dont take this as a qualified advice or tip. I dont have anything to show for to claim any sme on this. Below is my frame work to improve this.

    1. You still need your sights aligned but now your visual plane is way out of front sight's, and waaaaay out of year's. I work on index which to me now means front sight pointing where I look AND front and rear aligned.

    Side track: when people cant pick their dot fast, it automatically means they dont bring their irons up correctly aligned too. I never realized how much micro adjustments I had to do with my irons alignment even if front sight was on target.

    So, whatever exercises or modalities i use, i need to be sure that when I bring my irons, they are aligned. I use dot shooting and SAFE exercise for that.

    Once I am reasonably sure of the above, I just try to commit to go all in on it but avoid point shooting. Easier said than done.
    “Well," said Pooh, "what I like best," and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called.

  3. #53
    Site Supporter Norville's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TCinVA View Post
    Without a distinctive aiming reference on that, a "pattern" is normal.

    Try it with an actual B8 down there and see how it do. Goal is just keep the irons in the black, work the trigger.
    I will try that. Interestingly, the last time I shot group in a class setting the instructor (Steve Anderson) specifically advocated a 'zone' aiming technique and did not advocate an aiming point such as a paster on a USPSA head box. Results were good from 25 yards and in with a dot. Over the years I have heard many different opinions on this, and both have worked well for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by GOTURBACK View Post
    Are there any tips that would help someone develop their target focus ability if they have never consciously utilized it before?
    I'd say just go out and try it. Use a B8 like I did so you can have something crisp to focus on the target at a reasonable 7-10 yards. Shift your focus from the front sight to the target and back, fire a few shots and see how it goes. Adjust distance as you go.

  4. #54
    King of Craft Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Target focus on a single static target with iron sights seems unnecessary. I get the most out of target focus shooting with irons on an array of targets, a moving target, or when I'm shooting on the move.

    Here's a good way to train target focus: 6 shots on a standard 3 target array: shoot 2 on one target, look at the center of the scoring area on the next target, then and only then move your gun to engage that target, etc.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You don’t really graduate from certain problems or certain things… like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  5. #55
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Target focus on a single static target with iron sights seems unnecessary. I get the most out of target focus shooting with irons on an array of targets, a moving target, or when I'm shooting on the move.

    Here's a good way to train target focus: 6 shots on a standard 3 target array: shoot 2 on one target, look at the center of the scoring area on the next target, then and only then move your gun to engage that target, etc.
    Crawl, walk, run

  6. #56
    Member JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    Target focus on a single static target with iron sights seems unnecessary. I get the most out of target focus shooting with irons on an array of targets, a moving target, or when I'm shooting on the move.

    Here's a good way to train target focus: 6 shots on a standard 3 target array: shoot 2 on one target, look at the center of the scoring area on the next target, then and only then move your gun to engage that target, etc.
    Context is king! Thanks for that tip. I'm looking forward to this Sunday.
    "I realized all the mindset talk was useless without action and that with action, all the mindset talk was unnecessary." - Mike Pannone

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