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Thread: Best Way to Conduct a Safe Chamber Check?

  1. #31
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    I think that gringo and voodoo described the same method, and it is what I use as taught by Clint Smith in ‘99.
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  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by voodoo_man View Post
    One Sgt, one time decided she was going to just go around and touch the extractor to make sure every pistol was loaded. If that's something you do, just be advised that the difference is only 1mm or 2mm. Very difficult. She ended up feeling an extractor and telling the officer that the gun wasn't loaded, the officer told her it was, she took the gun and discharged into the ceiling trying to prove him wrong.

    Still has her stripes last time I checked, but won't be fondling any pistols anytime soon. Lesson is, it's either loaded or it isn't you have to check without pulling the trigger and be 100% certain.



    After reading this thread last night I decided to to do some chamber checks at the range today... for science. Its not something that is part of my normal operations for range shooting. I don't believe I did them when carrying either but its been a long time.

    My normal method is the support hand c-clamp like Rapiers pic but on the forward part of the slide. And the trigger finger touches the brass to cover low/no light situations.

    BUT with a 22 plus a red dot on something like a 6-second mount, I didn't have room up front. I used the sling shot method since even the overhand was tough.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by rayrevolver View Post


    After reading this thread last night I decided to to do some chamber checks at the range today... for science. Its not something that is part of my normal operations for range shooting. I don't believe I did them when carrying either but its been a long time.

    My normal method is the support hand c-clamp like Rapiers pic but on the forward part of the slide. And the trigger finger touches the brass to cover low/no light situations.

    BUT with a 22 plus a red dot on something like a 6-second mount, I didn't have room up front. I used the sling shot method since even the overhand was tough.
    Yep.

    During training days, the guys who press check and confirm magazine seat are the guys I usually don't have to worry about. Just personal experience.
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  4. #34
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    Since much of my shooting is rimfire pistols, I tend to be a bit obsessive about magazine seating and chamber checks after loading a magazine for two reasons. One is that many older .22 designs need a cartridge in the chamber to stop the firing pin from dinging the chamber wall. So making sure a round is in the chamber before squeezing the trigger is imperative. Second is that some rimfire magazines do not provide tactile feedback when seating the magazine. The A54-framed Ruger Standard is one of these, especially with modern replacement magazines without the metal base. I also ran into an issue with fully loaded Glock magazines not locking into the gun when the chamber was loaded. I have even failed to seat a 1911 magazine. It is a bit unnerving when the second round fails to feed, and the result is the dreaded "click". A related reason is that rimfire feeding is prone to issues not seen too often with centerfire, such as deformed (during feeding) cases and bullets causing feed issues.

    Lots of these pistols also do not have slides, instead using a blowback bolt. So I use a few different techniques, but the basics are the same. The strong hand controls the muzzle direction and keeps the pistol well below where it would be for sighting (idea is to put a bullet into the backstop, not over it) and the trigger finger is indexed on the receiver. The weak hand stays behind the ejection port (use the same concept when a round fails to fire although I cannot remember the last hang fire I had) and grasps the proper place (bolt wings or slide serrations) while the gun is rotated around the axis of the bore to allow a good look at the chamber. Once satisfied a round is chambered, I return the slide and bolt to battery while rotating the pistol so the sights are once again vertical.

    I do not claim the above is the best way to do it; it does work for my needs.

  5. #35

  6. #36
    Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCountyGuy View Post
    I’ll add another recommendation to the method TGS described.

    Another method is to take one’s thumb and hook it under the beaver tail area, then take your index and middle fingers and hook them on the rear sight and use a pinching motion to slightly retract the slide.
    That is the method I have always used.

  7. #37
    Hammertime
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Desert Southwest

    Best Way to Conduct a Safe Chamber Check?

    To check if loaded on Glocks I just feel the extractor for a bump and if daylight look for brass at the gap.

    They are designed so the extractor acts as a loaded chamber indicator. It becomes just a bit proud when loaded. This is easier right handed but I am sure there are left handed shooter ways to do it. Practice with snap caps.

    Note that if you install an Apex extractor this functionality is lost.

    Edited a third time to add that if you want to confirm it’s empty, lock the slide open, remove the magazine and inspect the chamber.

    I don’t particularly like any of the loaded chamber checks that involve partially opening the slide. They can lead to injury and or throwing a round out accidentally, especially in those with weaker hands.

    Most “shot my hand” injuries happen to the palm of the non dominant small and ring finger area. Usually in older, weaker, or inexperienced shooters with a smaller gun. Many of these injuries during administrative handling of the slide. The less of that the better IMO.
    Last edited by Doc_Glock; 01-11-2020 at 06:39 PM.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wendell View Post
    Paul was so legit.

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