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Thread: What makes a Glock so shootable

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    No amount of grip angle changes are going to fix the fact that the Glock trigger guard is smaller than it needs to be and that some people can't press the trigger (no matter how they grip the pistol) without their finger dragging somewhere inside the trigger guard. This fucks up your sight alignment when you least can afford it and led to untold frustration until I sold the gun.

    If it weren't for that, I'd probably still have that 17 and possibly a 19 as well.
    Unless my grip is just about perfect, I do suffer from this. I’m either dragging my trigger finger across the bottom of the trigger guard or along the top of the trigger well. I don’t have this issue with any other pistol frame.

  2. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by JTQ View Post
    Since a forum member asked me, some may not have seen the video's. Here are two I found. If you have more, the folks would probably enjoy them.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b9M3UGkgDI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qLTs0gIaSt4
    Thanks, those video's are from my current youtube page. I am just not active on youtube these days.

  3. #93
    Quote Originally Posted by Cool Breeze View Post
    Any chance you can post a Pic of a few different options? I'm having a hard time understanding the explanation.

    Are you literally changing the grip around the gun to achieve this? 1 version of your grip has middle knuckle directly under trigger guard causing wrist to be more flat while version two middle knuckle is to right of trigger guard causing it to be bent?

    Or are you keeping grip same and just bending wrist from varying degrees of flat to towards your forearm? Thank you!
    I would have to look to determine, but I have no idea how much finger I am using, and where my middle knuckle is. No idea whether my finger is dragging in the trigger guard. What I do know is how I am setting my wrist angle, up and down and side to side, and the tension in my wrist. That allows me to move the straight trigger back, regardless of whether my finger is rubbing in the trigger guard or how much finger I have on the trigger. Here is a short video showing it, shooting support hand. (BTW, the screenshot of the video, is demonstrating the “wrong way.”

    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  4. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by GreggW View Post
    I’m still subscribed to your new YouTube channel. I would love it if you would start putting out videos again. Any chance of seeing something from you on the G45?
    Thanks for being a subscriber. I am just not as active on youtube anymore. I lost a lot of the desire and I find that I am extremely busy with work. When I do get the 45MOS set up complete I will shoot some video when I do my normal back to back comparisons, and maybe give some thoughts. Thanks again for the interest!

  5. #95
    Quote Originally Posted by john c View Post
    I need this sort of instruction. Do you know of an instructor who can teach this?

    I’m a “pretty good” shooter, but I think that subtle issues like this (and probably 20 other issues) are holding me back by 1-2%. These are the hard issues to work on, because there’s not a lot of info out there on subtle techniques.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    The small nuances of shooting technique make for huge differences. When you look at the vast number of "instructors" out there from LE, Military, and the private sector, there is a very small percentage of those who are experts at diagnostics and intimately understanding what each shooters issue truly is.

    Negative results on target can be manifested by a number of factors, some small and many in conjunction. There are still fewer instructors that can take the correct diagnosis and have the ability to conduct remediation in the most effective and correct step process to most effectively fix the shooter.

    There are tons of instructors who can run a line and teach base methodology, but the true fixers are harder to find. Also, much of those who can truly teach and remediate at these high levels get paid to do it.

    Mention your preferred area and some may be able to give suggestions.

  6. #96
    Site Supporter Cool Breeze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    I would have to look to determine, but I have no idea how much finger I am using, and where my middle knuckle is. No idea whether my finger is dragging in the trigger guard. What I do know is how I am setting my wrist angle, up and down and side to side, and the tension in my wrist. That allows me to move the straight trigger back, regardless of whether my finger is rubbing in the trigger guard or how much finger I have on the trigger. Here is a short video showing it, shooting support hand. (BTW, the screenshot of the video, is demonstrating the “wrong way.”

    The wrist moves in 3 directions so I was just trying to get an understanding the type of wrist movement you are referring to when you say "setting your wrist side to side"?

    According to your video you are more referring to the specific angle of supination or pronation of the wrist/forearm - or what shooters generally call cant. In the video, it seems you are actually canting the gun very slightly reverse of the usual "gangsta style" method some people use with one handed shooting. Do you do this with 2 hand shooting too?

    I originally thought you were talking about setting the amount of flexion (bowing) or extension (cupping) of the wrist. If that were the case I was trying to understand how you were accomplishing that either rotating hand around gun grip or just keeping your grip the same while independently changing wrist angle somehow.

    Obviously vertical setting of the wrist on a Glock requires more ulnar deviation (vs radial deviation) due to the increased grip angle of the Glock.

  7. #97
    Site Supporter Cool Breeze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surf View Post
    The small nuances of shooting technique make for huge differences. When you look at the vast number of "instructors" out there from LE, Military, and the private sector, there is a very small percentage of those who are experts at diagnostics and intimately understanding what each shooters issue truly is.

    Negative results on target can be manifested by a number of factors, some small and many in conjunction. There are still fewer instructors that can take the correct diagnosis and have the ability to conduct remediation in the most effective and correct step process to most effectively fix the shooter.

    There are tons of instructors who can run a line and teach base methodology, but the true fixers are harder to find. Also, much of those who can truly teach and remediate at these high levels get paid to do it.

    Mention your preferred area and some may be able to give suggestions.
    1,000,000% on everything mentioned. If you are lucky to find one, stick with them.

  8. #98
    Here is a quick take on how I will set my wrists with my two-handed grip. My one-handed grip and stance vary.


  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surf View Post
    The small nuances of shooting technique make for huge differences. When you look at the vast number of "instructors" out there from LE, Military, and the private sector, there is a very small percentage of those who are experts at diagnostics and intimately understanding what each shooters issue truly is.

    Negative results on target can be manifested by a number of factors, some small and many in conjunction. There are still fewer instructors that can take the correct diagnosis and have the ability to conduct remediation in the most effective and correct step process to most effectively fix the shooter.

    There are tons of instructors who can run a line and teach base methodology, but the true fixers are harder to find. Also, much of those who can truly teach and remediate at these high levels get paid to do it.

    Mention your preferred area and some may be able to give suggestions.
    I wonder it part of the improvement is that as your wrist extends, the arm needs to come
    more to your center lint to maintain sight alignment?

  10. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by LOKNLOD View Post
    I agree. Nothing else feels as recoilcontrolly as a Glock.
    Have you shot a Glock 17 side by side with a full-size M&P with thumb safety?

    Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

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