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Thread: Glock Fun

  1. #1
    Member NETim's Avatar
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    Glock Fun

    I'm not sure what the appropriate area for this post should be but I'll throw it here.

    I am building another CO gun, a gen4 17, as backup to my original. The red dot has had a major impact on my ability to hit what I'm aiming at. These moderately old eyes just can't pick up the front sight anymore. Too much fuzzy!!! Everything I read indicates that the red dot WILL fail at some time. Therefore, the backup gun.

    Maybe there are better choices out there for CO than a Glock. For me, the fact that they simply run is a major attraction. Non-fussy guns are great. Readily available parts and mags is a definite plus. The fact that I can work on them and plug and play parts easily is another plus. I am finding that big flat grip area makes it easy to get a good hold on it and the dot arcs predictably for me. At this point in my USPSA career, the Glock isn't what costs me points. I would overaim and exit/enter shooting positions not so great regardless.

    This AM I boldly whipped out the Drem*l and polished the trigger group as per Internet instructions. As usual, it made a world of difference.
    In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.” ― C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by NETim View Post
    I'm not sure what the appropriate area for this post should be but I'll throw it here.

    I am building another CO gun, a gen4 17, as backup to my original. The red dot has had a major impact on my ability to hit what I'm aiming at. These moderately old eyes just can't pick up the front sight anymore. Too much fuzzy!!! Everything I read indicates that the red dot WILL fail at some time. Therefore, the backup gun.

    Maybe there are better choices out there for CO than a Glock. For me, the fact that they simply run is a major attraction. Non-fussy guns are great. Readily available parts and mags is a definite plus. The fact that I can work on them and plug and play parts easily is another plus. I am finding that big flat grip area makes it easy to get a good hold on it and the dot arcs predictably for me. At this point in my USPSA career, the Glock isn't what costs me points. I would overaim and exit/enter shooting positions not so great regardless.

    This AM I boldly whipped out the Drem*l and polished the trigger group as per Internet instructions. As usual, it made a world of difference.
    Glock parts can sometimes be improved by light polishing but deemed plus trigger parts is generally a recipe for problems from reliability to safety issues.

    Given the liability and safety issues involved in home brew trigger jobs and the availability of improved after market parts it is not something I would advocate.

    Hell half the aftermarket parts disable safety features in a quest for a “nicer” trigger pull and are problems waiting to happen.

    Do you keep a tourniquet on you ? How is your trauma training ? The last two GSW I saw at the range weren’t much fun.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by NETim View Post
    I'm not sure what the appropriate area for this post should be but I'll throw it here.

    I am building another CO gun, a gen4 17, as backup to my original. The red dot has had a major impact on my ability to hit what I'm aiming at. These moderately old eyes just can't pick up the front sight anymore. Too much fuzzy!!! Everything I read indicates that the red dot WILL fail at some time. Therefore, the backup gun.

    Maybe there are better choices out there for CO than a Glock. For me, the fact that they simply run is a major attraction. Non-fussy guns are great. Readily available parts and mags is a definite plus. The fact that I can work on them and plug and play parts easily is another plus. I am finding that big flat grip area makes it easy to get a good hold on it and the dot arcs predictably for me. At this point in my USPSA career, the Glock isn't what costs me points. I would overaim and exit/enter shooting positions not so great regardless.

    This AM I boldly whipped out the Drem*l and polished the trigger group as per Internet instructions. As usual, it made a world of difference.
    You are at no disadvantage with a Glock in USPSA production, CO, or limited.
    Formerly givo08.

  4. #4
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NETim View Post
    I'm not sure what the appropriate area for this post should be but I'll throw it here.

    I am building another CO gun, a gen4 17, as backup to my original. The red dot has had a major impact on my ability to hit what I'm aiming at. These moderately old eyes just can't pick up the front sight anymore. Too much fuzzy!!! Everything I read indicates that the red dot WILL fail at some time. Therefore, the backup gun.

    Maybe there are better choices out there for CO than a Glock. For me, the fact that they simply run is a major attraction. Non-fussy guns are great. Readily available parts and mags is a definite plus. The fact that I can work on them and plug and play parts easily is another plus. I am finding that big flat grip area makes it easy to get a good hold on it and the dot arcs predictably for me. At this point in my USPSA career, the Glock isn't what costs me points. I would overaim and exit/enter shooting positions not so great regardless.

    This AM I boldly whipped out the Drem*l and polished the trigger group as per Internet instructions. As usual, it made a world of difference.
    Have fun with your blaster. Ignore the people who crap on home DIY trigger jobs without knowing what you did, how you did it, and how well you understand your own firearm. I've done several S&W revolver and CZ DA/SA action tuneups on my own guns that are 100% safe and I am very pleased with the results. The best is a 6 lb DA and a 2 3/4 lb SA on a CZ 75BD.

    I'm at an age where I can't focus on the front sight either unless I tilt my head back to look through the near focus portion of my glasses. But with a fiber optic front sight and the right (for me) combination of front sight and rear notch widths I can make any shot I need to make at speed.

    Nevertheless, a few weeks ago I bought a CZ P-10F Optics Ready if for no other reason than to have less hassle to deal with when the day comes that I decide to start using a reflex sight. So far I love it and it's the pistol that's winning me over to the striker fired side of the house, when Glock and S&W failed to do so.

  5. #5
    Member NETim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    Glock parts can sometimes be improved by light polishing but deemed plus trigger parts is generally a recipe for problems from reliability to safety issues.

    Given the liability and safety issues involved in home brew trigger jobs and the availability of improved after market parts it is not something I would advocate.

    Hell half the aftermarket parts disable safety features in a quest for a “nicer” trigger pull and are problems waiting to happen.

    Do you keep a tourniquet on you ? How is your trauma training ? The last two GSW I saw at the range weren’t much fun.
    I appreciate your concern. My mods are comparatively mild though. An Apex trigger, which uses a Gen3 trigger bar, a 5# striker spring, a 13lb recoil spring and SS guide rod and a Glock "-" connector. The guns pass the safety tests when I am done with the mods. It's no "match" trigger but it's a nice, smooth rolling break and the Apex flat faced trigger is just wonderful IMHO.

    I don't think I can get into too much trouble buffing trigger bearing surfaces with Flitz polishing compound.

    I've had trauma training from both Dark Angel Medical and Thunder Ranch (their HVD class w/trauma block.)
    In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.” ― C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NETim View Post
    I appreciate your concern. My mods are comparatively mild though. An Apex trigger, which uses a Gen3 trigger bar, a 5# striker spring, a 13lb recoil spring and SS guide rod and a Glock "-" connector. The guns pass the safety tests when I am done with the mods. It's no "match" trigger but it's a nice, smooth rolling break and the Apex flat faced trigger is just wonderful IMHO.

    I don't think I can get into too much trouble buffing trigger bearing surfaces with Flitz polishing compound.

    I've had trauma training from both Dark Angel Medical and Thunder Ranch (their HVD class w/trauma block.)
    Fitz and buffing wheel can go right through that finish.

    The normal $.25 trigger job formula involves fitz and a Q-tip not a Dremel.

    Although I guess it can’t be any worse than the aftermarket pyramid triggers.
    Last edited by HCM; 12-10-2019 at 06:20 PM.

  7. #7
    Member NETim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCM View Post
    Fitz and buffing wheel can go right through that finish.

    The normal $.25 trigger job formula involves fitz and a Q-tip not a Dremel.

    Although I guess it can’t be any worse than the aftermarket pyramid triggers.
    I've heard the finish/treatment on Glock parts is thin at best. I always use the Dremel on low speed for a short period of time. I've had very good luck thus far with my Dremelizing.
    In a sort of ghastly simplicity we remove the organ and demand the function. We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.” ― C.S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man

  8. #8
    The best thing I have found with gen 4 glocks is buying a bunch of spare parts ( ejector housing, trigger bars, connectors, safety plungers...) all oem and mix and matching parts. I've had several gen 4 pistols with especially bad triggers and turned them into pretty decent triggers doing that and with some polishing and I put a little tetra grease on the connector where it rubs against the trigger bar.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10mmfanboy View Post
    The best thing I have found with gen 4 glocks is buying a bunch of spare parts ( ejector housing, trigger bars, connectors, safety plungers...) all oem and mix and matching parts. I've had several gen 4 pistols with especially bad triggers and turned them into pretty decent triggers doing that and with some polishing and I put a little tetra grease on the connector where it rubs against the trigger bar.

    Playing with tolerance stacking via small parts is a valid method. Especially with Glock parts being relatively cheap. Trying multiple parts for tolerance fit used to be the first step in assembling S&W revolvers back in the day.

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