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Thread: Does It Matter Which Gun I Use For Dry Fire

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    .In a perfect world I would have two identical guns, one that got the Blade-Tech barrel and was used for dry fire practice and later live fire training with training ammo and stock barrel. The second gun would be the carry piece, with a box of carry ammo run through it every other month.

    pat
    Why a real gun with a training barrel instead of a SIRT?
    Random nobody.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    Why a real gun with a training barrel instead of a SIRT?
    I nave a SIRT, that I have tried to use with remedial shooters. I don't have the time or patience to dial in SIRT for each shooter until they think it is identical. In an ideal world, the correct answer is an identical, but non-funtional gun. There is a recent thread about how the SIRT is not as great as it is billed. I love my SIRT, but they will create training scars just like any other tool that is improperly or overly used. Several of my problem shooters hate it. The real gun approach allows some practical, consistent modification. Like Lasergrips? Flat triggers? Smooth triggers? Specific aftermarket sights? Slide stops? The two real guns and the training barrel can have all the same accessories, doodads, and gimmics; whether they help you, or you think they help you.

    Also, the real gun will allow huge amounts of training ammo through it allowing the wear to occur on the training piece rather than the carry piece. When you finish live fire at the range your carry piece, loaded and ready to rock goes into your carry holster, while your empty, unloaded and locked back training piece gets disassembled and the training barrel dropped in for your next week or month or whatever of dry practice. The training piece is easily identifiable visually and tactilely for dry practice, and until the next time you go to the range with training ammo the gun CANNOT be loaded before you get on the line, disassemble and reassemble it. Administrative manipulations of a live weapon are greatly reduced.

    Just some musing, and if I had the coin that is how I would do things.

    pat
    Last edited by UNM1136; 11-02-2019 at 07:28 AM.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by UNM1136 View Post
    I nave a SIRT, that I have tried to use with remedial shooters. I don't have the time or patience to dial in SIRT for each shooter until they think it is identical. In an ideal world, the correct answer is an identical, but non-funtional gun. There is a recent thread about how the SIRT is not as great as it is billed. I love my SIRT, but they will create training scars just like any other tool that is improperly or overly used. Several of my problem shooters hate it.

    Also, the real gun will allow huge amounts of training ammo through it allowing the wear to occur on the training piece rather than the carry piece. When you finish live fire at the range your carry piece, loaded and ready to rock goes into your carry holster, while your empty, unloaded and locked back training piece gets disassembled and the training barrel dropped in for your next week or month or whatever of dry practice. The training piece is easily identifiable visually and tactilely for dry practice, and until the next time you go to the range with training ammo the gun CANNOT be loaded before you get on the line, disassemble and reassemble it. Administrative manipulations of a live weapon are greatly reduced.

    Just some musing, and if I had the coin that is how I would do things.

    pat

    That makes sense.

    For where I'm at right now I think the most logical solution is to turn my Glock 19 into a training gun. I only carry it once or twice a week at most and I can carry my 26 at those times.
    Random nobody.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe in PNG View Post
    ...With a 1911, I don't really know what I should do. Should I use the 1911, and possibly pick up a training scar from repeatedly thumbing back the hammer?
    Rack the slide.
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  5. #45
    Site Supporter Clobbersaurus's Avatar
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    I like to have two very similar guns, one to keep for competition and one to put practice abuse on.

    When I shot my Elite II Beretta in competition I had a Girsan 92 clone as my practice gun.

    When I switched to a Gen 5 Glock 17, I had a Gen 2 G17 as a practice gun.

    Iíve now bought a brand new Gen 5 G17 which I will set up exactly like my old Gen 5. The new gun, one I prove it reliable, will be my competition gun and my old Gen 5 will be the practice mule. Iíll set it up to have a slightly heavier trigger than my competition gun. I think this is the best possible system to use for training.
    "Next time somebody says USPSA or IPSC is all hosing, junk punch them." - Les Pepperoni
    --

  6. #46
    Site Supporter Clusterfrack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypher View Post
    Why a real gun with a training barrel instead of a SIRT?
    I find a laser / SIRT type system to be counterproductive for most dryfire training.

    You want to learn to focus on the sights, and to see if they are stable by looking at them, not the laser spot on the target.

    You want to learn to call your dryfire "shots" by seeing where the sights were and how they were aligned when the gun went click. You do not want to train yourself to look for holes or laser spots on the target.
    "BJJ is sort of like nonconsensual yoga"
    "You donít really graduate from certain problems or certain thingsÖ like you always have to work on trigger control and pulling the trigger straight. " --Ben Stoeger 1/24/2018

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clusterfrack View Post
    I find a laser / SIRT type system to be counterproductive for most dryfire training.

    You want to learn to focus on the sights, and to see if they are stable by looking at them, not the laser spot on the target.

    You want to learn to call your dryfire "shots" by seeing where the sights were and how they were aligned when the gun went click. You do not want to train yourself to look for holes or laser spots on the target.
    I've only ever seen a SIRT once, I keep forgetting it has a laser on it
    Random nobody.

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