Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 41 to 49 of 49

Thread: Modern Relevance of the Cooper Color Code?

  1. #41
    The other day, I was walking in an extra touristy part of a regional tourist town with two coworkers during a lunch break. A female coworker carries a shiny purse and wears a fancy watch and was accessorized as such on that day. I noticed a tweaker-looking guy. I saw him in the reflection of a shop window. He appeared to be staring at my female coworker's purse. We walked about a half block and he was still following and looking at her purse. I picked a random shop and said pretty loudly, "hey, let's check this one out" and got us into the store pretty quickly. That got us off line and got me facing him without appearing confrontational. I now also had room to move without having to step into the street and I felt much better about reacting and -- if necessary -- getting my gun into play. He stared at us and then quickly crossed the street. He didn't bother with a crosswalk.

    It's certainly possible he was just checking out my coworker's ass, but my gut said either a purse snatching or robbery. I suppose the biggest lesson here is that no, they don't just "come out of nowhere," which I suppose is the thing the color codes are supposed to help prevent. Using my environment (reflections) to be aware certainly helped me identify that. Having the mindset of, "yes, it is possible that bad things can happen in a 'nice' part of town, and yes, it's possible that bad things could even happen to me," as espoused by Cooper, @Tom_Givens, and a myriad of others, was definitely a factor in maintaining that alertness -- as was not walking around with my phone in my face. Doing a deliberate direction change, as taught by @jlw and others, helped me ascertain his intent and -- should it have become necessary -- would have helped me articulate why I took whatever defensive actions became necessary.

  2. #42
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    south TX
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    I believe it is because the Weaver is a 'contrived' stance, nothing about the stance is a natural response to danger. On the other hand, the Isosceles is somewhat based on the body's natural alarm response.

    Even back in the day we recognized that teaching run of the mill officers the Weaver stance, was somewhat counterproductive, because very little of the stance is naturally assumed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    ...........This statement is likely true for someone locked in the throes of a fight or flight response, but what of the person who has experienced such events, in training, in actuality, or through mental rehearsal?..................WE can learn behaviors to help us overcome the stress response, it isn't voodoo as it once was.
    I always thought that, while the Weaver might not be natural, it flowed well with the cop interview stance and a boxing stance, so training is a factor.

    During an instructor in-service with Mark Fricke, he asked, "Who shoots Isocoles? Who shoots Weaver? Who shoots some personally bastardized version of one or the other?"

    As my journey has progressed, I have ebbed and flowed somewhere between the two as I have aged...and learned. I also recently re-read one of Col. Cooper's commentaries regarding the preoccupation with Inconsequential Increments.

    In my own journey, I've gone from Weaver.....more appropriately modified Chapman.....to Isocoles/thumbs-forward, and now moving somewhat back.

    Or, maybe, I've had enough to drink tonight and my mind is wandering a bit.
    Last edited by Chuck Whitlock; 09-25-2019 at 07:54 PM.
    (Formerly known as Sotex.)

  3. #43
    Member HopetonBrown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    California Uber Alles
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Lehr View Post
    I believe it is because the Weaver is a 'contrived' stance, nothing about the stance is a natural response to danger. On the other hand, the Isosceles is somewhat based on the body's natural alarm response.

    Even back in the day we recognized that teaching run of the mill officers the Weaver stance, was somewhat counterproductive, because very little of the stance is naturally assumed.
    Ken Hackathorn said from watching countless OIS videos during his visits to Quantico, he saw that officers only fought in Weaver if they were already in Weaver before bullets started flying. Otherwise officers who had been taught Weaver would naturally shoot from some form of isocoles.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by jetfire View Post
    A fun anecdote about why Jack shot the way he did - he had a shoulder injury in his support arm that prevented him from comfortably extending that arm to its full reach, and so the best way he could get two hands on the gun and manage recoil was what we now see as the classic Weaver stance.
    And before that, everyone did the "FBI crouch" because that's how Jelly Bryce shot. I wonder how much time we've spent shooting in certain ways for no reason other than that's how some famous guy did it.

  5. #45
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Fredericksburg, VA
    Related to the Weaver Stance discussion, I’ve included screenshots of C Stories, where various early masters are sketched showing their technique with the pistol. It is possible to note that Jack Weaver’s technique is not textbook-correct to what was promulgated and taught as the “Weaver Stance”.

    Name:  063B1D0A-653A-4D85-8FCA-9689AC4ECED7.jpg
Views: 125
Size:  40.4 KB

    Name:  8F57DB0A-F1D2-4E0B-A92A-AE9C4B357590.jpg
Views: 127
Size:  52.4 KB

    Name:  C4A9A840-DFD7-4B94-8125-751A2BABD006.jpg
Views: 128
Size:  50.8 KB

    Name:  1AE83F37-A6E6-4A11-8698-65B2315566C1.jpg
Views: 128
Size:  47.1 KB
    Per the PF Code of Conduct, I have a commercial interest in the StreakTM product as sold by Ammo, Inc.

  6. #46
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Kansas City

  7. #47
    Gray Hobbyist Wondering Beard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    The Coterie Club
    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    We've come a long way, baby
    “An ill-educated person behaves with arrogant impatience, whereas truly profound education breeds humility.” Alexander Solzhenitsyn
    "There are problems in this universe for which there are no answers." Paul Muad'dib

  8. #48
    Site Supporter
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois
    Dudes look like they're about to drop a country western quintet studio album...

    Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

  9. #49
    Site Supporter jetfire's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sioux Falls
    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    Every time I see this photo I want one of those slightly backwards raked race holsters they're wearing.
    I shot the PX4 before it was cool.

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •