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Thread: Security guard pulls gun on Lucas County Sheriff's deputy

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by olstyn View Post
    "Other lawful purposes" seems like it would be broad enough to cover pretty much any non-criminal conduct. I am not a lawyer, but given that language, I have a hard time understanding how civilian carry permit holders are not legally allowed to carry in federal buildings. Is there a different statute that somehow makes things more restrictive without being in conflict with that one, or have the courts just interpreted the law in such a way as to make the effective outcome different than the plain language?
    Yes when common sense is applied. But the laws were written by politicians and we all know how they feel about LE/Mil and guns in general.

    Let’s also remember that this same thing could happen at private property. The Staples Center is famous for not allowing LE inside armed unless they are working an event. The NFL and others have followed that ridiculous policy the last several years.

    I suspect this particular guard doesn’t like LE and saw the rules for the faculae his excuse to boss them around and try to “flex” on the deputy. I can’t say for sure what I’d do in that situation and hope I never have to find out. But I’d have a hard time not shooting someone pointing a firearm at me. Glad it ended without bloodshed.
    Unless you have a large, tubular optic on your pistol, front slide serrations are dumb and cosmetic. It pains me to see armed professionals get so excited over them.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy_[ View Post
    Reasons why open carry is stupid.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lester Polfus View Post
    I always find it amazing that entities try to have security, particularly armed security, as cheaply as possible and are shocked when something goes awry.
    Bingo
    Random nobody.

  4. #44
    Site Supporter Zincwarrior's Avatar
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    Did not see this posted. If so my apologies:
    Charged with aggravated menacing
    https://www.13abc.com/content/news/S...512552471.html


    TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - A security guard has pleaded Not Guilty to one charge of aggravated menacing Monday in his first court appearance since he pulled a gun on a Lucas County Sheriff's Deputy at a local IRS office.

    That deputy is still trying to wrap his head around a potentially fatal situation that arose out of what should have been a simple encounter. The deputy came to 4 Seagate to ask a question at the IRS office. A step that nearly cost him his life.

    As Lucas County Sheriff's deputy Alan Gaston enters the IRS office, he's in full uniform with his badge with his firearm visible.

    He was on duty May 31st but says he stopped at the office for a phone number to ask about a letter he got from the IRS. Deputy Gaston says the guard told him he needed to put his gun in his car. Gaston said he couldn't do that. The conversation ends with a gun pointed at the deputy's back. Gaston vividly remembers "that" moment.

    "Basically preparing myself to be shot at that moment. Bracing for a shot in my back," said Gaston.

    The whole thing caught on security cameras, as the guard follows deputy Gaston to the elevator with the gun out and it appears his finger very close to the trigger. The guard then tries to take Gaston into custody, once again with the gun drawn.

    "There's really no way to know how you're going to act when there's a gun pointed at you and when you think you're going to lose your life," said Gaston.

    Gaston works as a defensive tactics instructor. He says he felt the best way to de-escalate the situation was to walk away. Eventually, Toledo police arrived after getting a 911 call. But the caller from inside the IRS office never tells 911 the man with the gun is a uniformed deputy sheriff.

    Gaston's biggest concern as this incident unfolded were the other people in the office.

    "If I'm going to get shot, like I thought I was, it's not fair. They came in there to do their business," said Gaston.

    Gaston and his wife have now filed a civil lawsuit against that security guard Seth Eklund and the security company seeking compensation after Gaston allegedly suffered emotion and psychological distress and lost wages.

    He's currently on medical leave from the Lucas County Sheriff's department. Gaston has a message for the guard.

    "I would say ‘Clearly your training is lacking and the fact that you went 0 to 100. Lethal force is unacceptable," said Gaston.

    13abc tried to reach Eklund for comment but we could not reach him. We have also asked the IRS for a comment but have not heard back yet.

  5. #45
    Site Supporter Rex G's Avatar
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    The very definition of “NPE” is a place with overly-zealous security personnel. I dress accordingly.

    I am no lawyer, but know that I was able to walk into a social security office, in my jurisdiction, while armed, in uniform, whether on or off the clock, while an active LEO. The security guard had no problem with it.

    The relevant parts of the U.S code do allow local LEOs to carry handguns onto the premises of many federal facilities, which is understandable, as local LEOs are called to respond to such places, and many, if not most, local LEOs are “always subject to duty,” or something to that effect. Now that I am retired from LEO-ing, it is my presumption that I should not carry into/onto most federal facilities, as parts of the LEOSA remain as clear as mud.

    The Texas Penal Code appears to give honorably retired LEOs plenty of latitude that the federal LEOSA does not, but I no longer have “official” status, and am no longer “subject to duty,” so am careful when approaching federally-controlled places.
    Retar’d LE

  6. #46
    100% american mongrel blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex G View Post
    The very definition of “NPE” is a place with overly-zealous security personnel. I dress accordingly.

    I am no lawyer, but know that I was able to walk into a social security office, in my jurisdiction, while armed, in uniform, whether on or off the clock, while an active LEO. The security guard had no problem with it.

    The relevant parts of the U.S code do allow local LEOs to carry handguns onto the premises of many federal facilities, which is understandable, as local LEOs are called to respond to such places, and many, if not most, local LEOs are “always subject to duty,” or something to that effect. Now that I am retired from LEO-ing, it is my presumption that I should not carry into/onto most federal facilities, as parts of the LEOSA remain as clear as mud.

    The Texas Penal Code appears to give honorably retired LEOs plenty of latitude that the federal LEOSA does not, but I no longer have “official” status, and am no longer “subject to duty,” so am careful when approaching federally-controlled places.
    NC makes it pretty clear via this chart where carry under LEOSA is a go or no-go. It also describes who qualifies under the first column (see page 2).

    They send a copy of that chart with the card I receive each year after qualifying with the sheriff's office.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu | "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  7. #47
    Site Supporter Rex G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blues View Post
    NC makes it pretty clear via this chart where carry under LEOSA is a go or no-go. It also describes who qualifies under the first column (see page 2).

    They send a copy of that chart with the card I receive each year after qualifying with the sheriff's office.
    The Texas Penal Code states, pretty darn clearly, in section 46.15(a)(5), that honorably retired peace officers have the same weapon carry privileges as active LEOs. The Texas Penal Code does not directly address the federal LEOSA. Notably, when I qual, as a retiree, I have to specify whether I want the qual to satisfy the state requirements, or both state and federal. The language on the back side of my ID addresses both, and gives different expiration dates for the state and federal firearms certificates. (Texas is OK with a qual every two years, though that may only apply to quals fired under Texas-specific requirements, so an out-of-state retiree should presumably be LEOSA-compliant, with an annual qual, if traveling in Texas.)
    Last edited by Rex G; 07-16-2019 at 12:59 PM.
    Retar’d LE

  8. #48
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    I've been doing security since 2008(?). The vast majority of my coworkers have been regular people, showing up for work, going through the motions and trying to make a living.

    But every once in a while you run into an idiot who thinks being a security guard actually imputes some authority to them. I've even had a few coworkers who would make up their own rules just to prove they were in charge.

    The best example I can give was a client employee who showed up one morning without his company ID. The protocol for that was simple, verify the employee's driver's license, call security control and have them verify the employee's employment status with the company. If everything checks out you issue them a temporary badge and go about your day. It usually took about 3 minutes.

    That wasn't good enough for Ralph. He made the guy wait at the gate while he called me in from my rounds to escort the guy to his office. That took 15 minutes and the client employee was fuming by the time I got there. The client was far enough up the corporate ladder to have my coworker fired and If my coworker hadn't literally died a few weeks later I'm sure he would have.

    It sounds like the guy in the story was the same way. He just had to show that cop that he was in charge and by God that cop was going to respect his authority. The fact he was flexing on a cop probably made it feel better.

    Had it been me I probably would have kept my mouth shut. If I had said anything I would have explained the rule to the cop and when he told me no I would have logged it and gone about my business.
    Random nobody.

  9. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Rex G View Post
    The very definition of “NPE” is a place with overly-zealous security personnel.
    While most are decent folks, based on my direct experience, I consider security people to be fairly high up on the threat scale. I have seen some absolutely bizzaro decision making from some of those folks, and would prefer to have zero interactions with any of them.
    I was into 10mm Auto before it sold out and went mainstream.

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