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Thread: How proficient were the man killers of old?

  1. #141
    Site Supporter Rex G's Avatar
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    Random Thoughts

    Just as there is no substitute for really being hit, in order to learn how to take really being hit, in the unarmed combatives area, there is no substitute for really experiencing incoming ordnance. Modern multimedia training methods, and visualization, can only go so far. This is my opinion.

    Being able to survive one’s first shooting situation may well depend upon having reached a state of unconscious competence with one’s weapon, so that operating the weapon is reflexive, and therefore inoculated against stress.

    Unconscious competence, I believe, has a much longer shelf life than “perishable skill.”
    Retar’d LE

    Don’t tread on volcanos!

  2. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex G View Post
    Just as there is no substitute for really being hit, in order to learn how to take really being hit, in the unarmed combatives area, there is no substitute for really experiencing incoming ordnance. Modern multimedia training methods, and visualization, can only go so far. This is my opinion.

    Being able to survive one’s first shooting situation may well depend upon having reached a state of unconscious competence with one’s weapon, so that operating the weapon is reflexive, and therefore inoculated against stress.

    Unconscious competence, I believe, has a much longer shelf life than “perishable skill.”
    Concur.

    The only time I was shot at (and knew it), the operation of my weapon system was at a subconscious level. While I have no particular desire to be shot at in the future, if it happens, I want to be at a similar level of “unconscious competence” when I react.
    While you can’t practice being shot at, you can practice weapon system operation under stress, and while focused on other things.
    I’d submit that the best realistic preparation for a serious encounter is attaining and maintaining a high level of unconscious competence in operating the weapon system that will likely be available to you.

  3. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex G View Post
    Unconscious competence, I believe, has a much longer shelf life than “perishable skill.”
    Rex, as I get older, more broken, and less able to train like I once did, I pray to the good Lord you're right! (smile)

    Dave

  4. #144
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave T View Post
    Rex, as I get older, more broken, and less able to train like I once did, I pray to the good Lord you're right! (smile)

    Dave
    I can't say exactly what happened after I took a few rounds to my plate but I remember my kabar in the fucker.

    Now while I'm typing out paperwork of restraints I can be very detailed and specific with my documentation but I do it nearly every day.

    Im 35 and getting to the point where I feel it. I'm right with ya. There's a scene in the movie "Cold Mountain" where a bad guy brags about the confidence of youth right before he dies. I think he kill the good guy so it might be a bad example.

  5. #145
    Site Supporter Rex G's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave T View Post
    Rex, as I get older, more broken, and less able to train like I once did, I pray to the good Lord you're right! (smile)

    Dave
    I’ll pray, for you.

    My .22 LR S&W Model 17-4 became very important to me, from 2011 onward, as .40 Snap & Whip, fired from my high-bore-axis P229R DAK duty pistol, became less tolerable, for my right hand/wrist. (DAK, if one allows the trigger to return fully forward, each time, mimics an S&W K-frame DA trigger quite well, thankfully.)

    Reverting to a revolver, as a primary duty handgun, was not an option, in 2011, as I did not “grandfather” any of my revolvers in 1997, when specified .40 autos became the standardized duty pistols. (I could still use DA revolvers for personal-time carry, and “back-up” while at work.)
    Retar’d LE

    Don’t tread on volcanos!

  6. #146
    Below are a couple passages that relate to shooting exploits and practicing by Ranger regiments in the 1830's-1840's. These are taken from Texas Ranger: Jack Hays in the Frontier Southwest by James Greer. This text was original published in the 1930's so it is much more mythtory that what we might consider more modern history.

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    And why not include a few shots of the tools in question from a recent visit to the Texas Ranger Museum in Waco.

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    Last edited by Coal Train; 07-11-2019 at 03:00 PM.

  7. #147
    Member eb07's Avatar
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    30 paces is approximately 25 yards. Good shooting Ranger!

  8. #148
    Secutor veritatis sum wvincent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coal Train View Post

    And why not include a few shots of the tools in question from a recent visit to the Texas Ranger Museum in Waco.

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    Is that the Ranger Museum or the Bolke Annex at Jackson armory?
    Thanks for those pics!!
    Last edited by wvincent; 07-11-2019 at 03:50 PM.
    "Just because a girl sleeps with her brother doesn't mean she's easy..."-Blues

  9. #149
    Quote Originally Posted by wvincent View Post
    Is that the Ranger Museum or the Bolke Annex at Jackson armory?
    Thanks for those pics!!
    Ranger Museum in Waco

  10. #150
    The text below is from Taming the Nueces Strip: The Story of McNelly's Rangers by George Durham. This is a first hand account of one of the Rangers (George Durham) who rode with McNelly's "Special Force" from 1875 to 1877. It is interesting to see some of the "themes" that still persist today (e.g. "dudes watching dudes'/PatMac, going too fast, the cost of ammo, "I grew up shooting", and finally settling on working on the fundamentals of accuracy). Nothing new under the sun.

    Mr. Durham's marksmanship eventually improved, judging by the fact that he survived his eventful time in the Rangers. After he left the Rangers he worked on the King Ranch for the rest of his days. Not a bad life.


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    Last edited by Coal Train; 07-18-2019 at 06:55 AM.

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