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Thread: 22LR Pistol suggestion...

  1. #11
    Site Supporter hufnagel's Avatar
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    Feb 2011
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    Still a big fan of my Beretta M9-22/Ruger SR-22/S&W 617 trifecta.
    Rules to live by: 1. Eat meat, 2. Shoot guns, 3. Fire, 4. Gasoline, 5. Make juniors
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  2. #12
    Site Supporter Zincwarrior's Avatar
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    Oct 2016
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    I have all three, like all three.

    Two big points.

    1) They are the same. All have a good base accuracy depending on the model. All can be tweaked into major bullseye guns. All can be used for steel challenge.

    2) You really need to physically GRIP ALL THREE. The biggest difference is the grip, and particularly the grip angle. Ruger's grip angle is quite a bit different then the other two. People tend to gravitate to one or the other. Pick it up, swing it around and get a feel. Your own hands will quickly tell you which one you prefer.

  3. #13
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    I have way too many .22s, but the ones that get the most trigger time are:

    1) M&P22c. I picked this up when I was still mostly M&P, and it just plain runs. I replaced the sights and added a barrel bushing that tightened up groups a bit. Reliability has been great.

    2) Ruger 22/45 5.5 bull MkIV. My current favorite, reliable and accurate.
    Ken

  4. #14
    I've been shooting my P250C .22LR a lot lately. The fire control unit is identical to that of centerfire models, so the trigger press carries over. Really like it, and it's accurate. Only issues have been ammo issues that show up with other guns using the same ammo.

    I am a Buck Mark dork. The forum at Rimfire Central is the best repository of information for them or, frankly, any other rimfire. Most people just lube and shoot them and blast them out with solvent every once in awhile. I'm OCD and go through them 100 percent. I don't buy upgrade parts, but every part that isn't a threaded fastener or pin gets worked on (if there wasn't something to make better, they wouldn't get worked on). The result is worth it to me. I haven't had a Ruger Mk, but my GP100 received essentially the same treatment, and came out seriously sweet.

    I really like the legal interchangeability of Buck Mark barrels. If you want to try something different, go buy something different. They're cheap, and you can get them off fleabay.

    The firing pin length should be checked and if necessary, adjusted to prevent peening the barrel. Rugers do that, too, so there's nothing in it between them.
    .
    -----------------------------------------
    ^^^ DAO dork ^^^

  5. #15
    Site Supporter That Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystery View Post
    Ruger is the most popular but it is not that great from factory and needs few upgrades out of the box and a lot of upgrades to make it to the competition.
    As a Ruger owner, I would really like to know what these upgrades are that the gun needs.

    Lots of people like to tinker with their guns. In some competition cultures, tinkering is downright encouraged. Rarely is it necessary though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mystery View Post
    Not sure how to size hands
    I nominate Mechanix glove sizes as the universal measurement.

    *

    Anyways, I think you are seriously overthinking this. You can not rationally choose an optimal pistol for competition without even knowing what kind of competition you might be thinking about! And wasn't the original reason for this purchase "trying to develop basic marksmanship skills", not "must own customized competition pistol, my match scores depend on it"? Besides, you are a novice shooter, your taste in firearms is likely to mature over the years as you gain more experience. Trying to pick the gun that is optimal for you at the grand master level, while still being a novice, is not likely to succeed simply because you don't yet have grand master level knowledge of shooting. All you need to worry about at this point is not picking complete crap guns - and you have already done a really good job of that. Once you reach a sufficient level of quality, it's more personal preference than what is "best".

    Each firearm you mentioned works fine (I have no direct experience with the Smith & Wesson, but it has a good reputation). Each will function just fine as a training pistol for basic marksmanship. You could honestly just throw dice or use some other random number generator to choose one at random, and be just fine. Or, you could try renting one for a few sessions at the range and see how it goes for you, if that is possible at the range you shoot. Get some experience with shooting a .22 and then make a more informed choice on what best works for you.

  6. #16

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by That Guy View Post
    As a Ruger owner, I would really like to know what these upgrades are that the gun needs.

    Lots of people like to tinker with their guns. In some competition cultures, tinkering is downright encouraged. Rarely is it necessary though.
    I see three areas where the Ruger needs improvement for competition, the trigger, the barrel, and the sights. The factory Ruger trigger, especially on those pistols with magazine disconnects, is heavy and creepy. The barrel needs to be more tightly chambered and needs a better crown for best accuracy. The sights are not the best for the small targets at the fifty-yard line.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    I'd do the M&P 22C.
    Considering your past posts here, I think LL's suggestion might make you happier than the three options you gave, however....

    I own a Ruger Mk.II 4" tapered barrel, a late 80s Buck Mark 4" bull barrel, and a friend has a Victory that is "space gunned" out. If I was trying to build a pure target monster, I'd buy whatever platform was cheapest and worry more about accessories than the base gun. If I wanted a target gun without messing around with modifying it, I'd buy the nicest BuckMark I could afford with a long bull barrel and highly visable sights. If I wanted a field gun, I'd get a 4" Ruger like the one I have now.

    I hope this is helpful.
    Sensei for President 2020: a man with a firm grasp on America's problems!

  9. #19
    One last datum: my friends and I all hate the safety on the Victory--it's easy to accidentally engage. Other than that, it's a nice platform.
    Sensei for President 2020: a man with a firm grasp on America's problems!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by That Guy View Post
    ...
    All you need to worry about at this point is not picking complete crap guns - and you have already done a really good job of that...
    So Heritage Rough Rider 22LR is something that would be complete crap?
    At $100, it's too tempting.

    Quote Originally Posted by LittleLebowski View Post
    I'd do the M&P 22C.
    That one and full size M&P 22LR is always in my radar as it is same as M&P9 for controls and grip etc... and 22c is only $260. Hmm...

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