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Thread: The Art and Science of Keeping Your 1911 Running

  1. #901
    Wannabe Privateer RevolverRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
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    Baddest Part of Town...
    The worst thing anyone ever did was come up with Allen/Torx screws for 1911s.

    "Hey let's eliminate the ability to take the gun apart without tools, by adding something that doesn't improve the function in the least!"
    Seriously guys, are we not doing 'phrasing' anymore?

  2. #902
    Quote Originally Posted by RevolverRob View Post
    The worst thing anyone ever did was come up with Allen/Torx screws for 1911s.

    "Hey let's eliminate the ability to take the gun apart without tools, by adding something that doesn't improve the function in the least!"
    I actually like hex head grip screws, as I've buggered up flat head slots. I also like a little window milled into the barrel hood for checking the chamber. I think m the only one who likes these two things.

  3. #903
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    The Hills of Tennessee
    Quote Originally Posted by SW CQB 45 View Post
    Shorikid

    I messed with it this morning. I made sure the sear spring did not move on me as I installed everything without the grip safety. It went on with no issues and function checks good. I did notice the hammer rotates further back (to cock) than my Gen 2 MCOP. I wonder if the hammer hooks set further back had anything to do with that.

    I am not sure the manufacture of the non Springer thumb safety.... it looks very Wilson Combat but it was mushy upon engagement and it appeared they did not fit the lug to the sear. I used my 10-8 block to keep my diamond file square and now it snaps up into place instead of being mushy.

    I need to tweak the grip safety portion of the spring as it seems soft.

    if Springer will take it back for warranty.... I will drop the ILS back in it.

    thanks for the advice



    There is a chance the the hammer hooks were cut slightly different, but there is a spec.doe where those hooks should be and it shouldn't be far enough out of spec for guys like us to spot. A top smith could smell it was out of spec! Glad you got your thumb safety sorted out. The number of people who just drop those sorts of parts in without fitting them scares the crap out of me.

    I love a very reactive, springy grip safety myself. The floppy, sloppy ones are not my favorite.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  4. #904
    Site Supporter
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    Jan 2012
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    Georgia
    Quote Originally Posted by Shorikid View Post
    The number of people who just drop those sorts of parts in without fitting them scares the crap out of me.
    Me too. Or when people try to fit those parts without really knowing how. The safeties on a 1911 have a narrow window of adjustment in which they work properly. Adjusting them requires knowing just how much material to remove at just the right place. If you remove too much from where the grip safety meets the trigger bow you ruin the part. But with a thumb safety if you remove too much not only do you ruin the part, but it renders the gun completely unsafe to use and may even allow the gun to fire unexpectedly.

    I'm no gunsmith, but learning how the safeties interact with the other systems in the gun is important for a 1911 user and essential to someone who feels they need to fine tune them.

  5. #905
    the actuation of this safety when I got the MCOP

    it had no click and full sweep up was met with a mushy feel.

    Upon inspection of the sear engagement lug, it was swaged and the corner was rolled from non-fitted contact with the sear.


    I like WC Bullet Proof safeties but I dont like new pricing.

    I have bought used and utilized a micro welder on blued safeties to build up the fitting lug and then refit.

    The cost to ship (both ways) and the welding was still much cheaper that buying new and turn around was not bad.

    IIRC, the bluing was not blemished with the micro welding.
    If you're going to be a bear….be a GRIZZLY!

  6. #906
    Quote Originally Posted by SW CQB 45 View Post
    Yes sir

    I dug out all new parts from my 1911 parts box.

    I am baffled on this one. Something is out of spec.

    When I cocked the hammer, it felt like I bottomed out. I forced the hammer further back but the hammer would not catch the sear.


    The Wolff spring might be too long. The original spec called for the end coils of the mainspring to be ground flat, Colt still does, Wolff does not. It can very well cause what you’re experiencing.

  7. #907
    I think I would take a simple inexpensive torx bit and JB Weld it into the screw.

    Quote Originally Posted by SW CQB 45 View Post

  8. #908
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwin View Post
    Yep, all of my three 1911s have idiot marks, either because I’ve had the gun for a long time and I was the idiot at 16, or because it was bought used. And then the EVO has a minor one because my dad who originally had it, through no fault of his own, has a terrible time disassembling/reassembling a 1911 due to arthritis. Doesn’t matter, they’re all used in kydex holsters. The EVO already has a good amount of finish worn off on the trigger guard and the dust cover that’s way more noticeable than the idiot mark.
    About 8 years ago I had my Colt .38 super cerocoated. It looked great until I started using it with a kydex holster. Years of draws later it has honest wear, scratches and nicks. A fair bit of silver steel shows in contrast to the satin black finish. But no idiot mark.. I am very close to buying some krylon rattle cans and giving it a backyard camo job.

  9. #909
    Quote Originally Posted by mmc45414 View Post
    I think I would take a simple inexpensive torx bit and JB Weld it into the screw.
    the torx screw comes out, but its beat to hell.

    I am sure I got some ruffy slotted screws in my pile.

    I never got a chance to call Springer.... maybe try tomorrow.
    If you're going to be a bear….be a GRIZZLY!

  10. #910
    Damnable 1911 Heretic Elwin's Avatar
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    Apr 2020
    Location
    Midwest
    So thanks to advice in this thread and sources I found by reading it (multiple times), I've successfully detail stripped and cleaned an old high round count Kimber Team Match II that really needed it, and tuned the grip safety to the point where I want it. I now have an issue with the drop safety in relation to the sensitized grip safety, but I'll be remedying that soon, probably tomorrow.

    The one problem I noticed while I had the gun apart was that the plunger tube has just the slightest amount of play. I doubt it would fail on the next range outing, but obviously something needs to be done about it. I've read all the plunger tube discussion from the beginning of the thread. My specific question is, what is the most expedient way to get the thing locked back in place with minimal resources available? I live in an apartment, so disassembly and some basic filing is totally doable. I won't be doing much more involved that that, though.

    I'm guessing stake and loctite? Or is there a different preferred solution for one that's just barely loose? Or am I better off taking a chance on a local gun smith?

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