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Thread: The Art and Science of Keeping Your 1911 Running

  1. #1021
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSW View Post
    I'm going to probably catch flack for this, but I have been using Froglube paste as a lube for years without any issues.
    It stays where you apply it, and lubricates fine in my applications
    If it's working for you that is all that matters.

    Last I heard Froglube was roller coaster grease dyed green with some fancy marketing. Sometimes I think we were better off way back in the day when you went to the hardware store and purchased a container of ... (wait for it)... "Gun Oil".

    Where have the radical advances occurred in the gun lube industry, performance or marketing? I suggest marketing is the big winner. How else would we have seen loads of 'the latest and greatest' fan boys running around lubing their blasters with canola oil at $1900+/ Gallon when Wesson & Crisco can sell it for under $6/Gal.

    Caveat emptor!

  2. #1022
    platform jumper CSW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnO View Post
    If it's working for you that is all that matters.

    Last I heard Froglube was roller coaster grease dyed green with some fancy marketing. Sometimes I think we were better off way back in the day when you went to the hardware store and purchased a container of ... (wait for it)... "Gun Oil".

    Where have the radical advances occurred in the gun lube industry, performance or marketing? I suggest marketing is the big winner. How else would we have seen loads of 'the latest and greatest' fan boys running around lubing their blasters with canola oil at $1900+/ Gallon when Wesson & Crisco can sell it for under $6/Gal.

    Caveat emptor!
    Well I don't know what the specific formula is, but I believe that it is a bio based clp.
    Too much can get runny if it gets too hot.
    The small jar I have has lasted almost 3 years

  3. #1023
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSW View Post
    Well I don't know what the specific formula is, but I believe that it is a bio based clp.
    Too much can get runny if it gets too hot.
    The small jar I have has lasted almost 3 years
    https://www.vuurwapenblog.com/genera...tory-analysis/

  4. #1024
    Illinexit in T-Minus 50 RevolverRob's Avatar
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    Silicone oil rated for incidental food contact makes a great weapon lube. Unlikely to expose you to any significant toxins. Thin enough to get where you want. Thick enough to stay where you put it. Wide temperature operating range. Since moving to Chicago, I discontinued all organic based oils and cleaners for guns. Too gummy at low temps. (I know gun close to you isn't "cold" why risk it when there are good oils that work to low temps and high temps?).

    Super Lube silicone oil comes in four different viscosity ratings from 100 to 5000. I've used their 100cst formula for the past 5-6 years now.

    Bonus to silicone oil, even when some of it flashes off, it's stupid easy to clean. I haven't had to actively work to clean a gun in years. Wipe it down within a few hours/day of shooting and it comes right off.
    Seriously guys, are we not doing 'phrasing' anymore?

  5. #1025
    Iím just thinking out loud, but if stainless steel even has the potential to be a problem, I failed to see why manufacturers continue to move towards it for 1911s. With the advancement with metal treatment today, why not stay with carbon steel which is known to be better for this application.

  6. #1026
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    Iím just thinking out loud, but if stainless steel even has the potential to be a problem, I failed to see why manufacturers continue to move towards it for 1911s. With the advancement with metal treatment today, why not stay with carbon steel which is known to be better for this application.
    Because the stainless steels used are softer than carbon steels in general (from what I've read and experienced with my own guns; I'm not a machinist and have no real world knowledge here beyond what's occurred with my stainless guns); same reason why BHPs were made with softer steels...harder steels would wear the tooling much faster, and there were a lot of machining operations that needed to be done to make one. That's why BHPs weren't known as high round count guns, and would shoot themselves loose on a heavy IPSC/IDPA practice schedule from what I've read..

  7. #1027
    Site Supporter farscott's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bucky View Post
    Iím just thinking out loud, but if stainless steel even has the potential to be a problem, I failed to see why manufacturers continue to move towards it for 1911s. With the advancement with metal treatment today, why not stay with carbon steel which is known to be better for this application.
    Because a maker can charge more for doing less. Stainless guns often sell at a premium to carbon steel and are perceived as more robust against the elements. Carbon steel needs some protective finish, whether bluing or something else. Stainless steel need not be finished and saves several process steps needed to apply the finish. The price difference between 4140 and 416 is pretty small. For 1000 pieces of the same length and diameter, the price delta was $0.10 per piece ($100 total) with the 4140 being less expensive. My guess is buying in the volumes needed by a gunmaker will drive the price delta even lower. So the labor costs of finishing really drive a business to use stainless alloys.

  8. #1028
    Quote Originally Posted by CSW View Post
    I'm going to probably catch flack for this, but I have been using Froglube paste as a lube for years without any issues.
    It stays where you apply it, and lubricates fine in my applications
    I tried it with my Colt .38 super. It worked just fine as long as I kept it clean. But at higher round counts [over 1000 rnds] it became quite gummy/pasty with dirt, etc., and slowed the slide down enough to create malfunctions. I still use a non-toxic lube like Balistol and Giessle oil/light grease. I use Frog lube for exterior use as rust protection where it is very, very good. The phosphate finish of my AR15 barrel can look dry cold but has it heats up the Frog lube makes it look wet.

    I could be convinced to try the Frog again since I now use stronger ammo and springs. Maybe enough to power through the paste but since I have found another non-toxic lube there is no reason.

  9. #1029
    Site Supporter 03RN's Avatar
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    ve fit 3 triggers before and never had an issue.

    This one I can't get it to either not drag the mag or feel rough in the frame.

    Any tips?

  10. #1030
    Site Supporter FrankB's Avatar
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    @03RN Polish the trigger channel, and trigger bow.
    ETA: Iíve only used WC triggers, and always had great results.

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