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Thread: Use of slide lock is unsafe?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlwaysLearning View Post
    I was told to use what I think is called the "overhand" method.
    There are some valid reasons to use the overhand method (just like there are valid reasons to use the slide stop/release), but avoiding a slam fire isn't one of them.

  2. #22
    no-goodnik blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drang View Post
    Some class or other I attended it was noted that Glocks have slide stops, not slide releases; that is, the slide stop is so small because it is not intended to be used as a slide release. YMMV. IANAL. You be you. And Fight The Derp!

    That said, which of the three methods of releasing the slide (overhand, slingshot, or slide stop) is best is one of those perennial topics along with 9mm v .45, 1911 v. Glock, and whether the FAST should be used as a drill.

    I've been using that "not a slide release" thingy on my Glocks since 1988 and am still here to tell the tale. Never even bothered to put its big brother on my guns.

    There's sure a bunch of B.S., Derp and FUD out there.

    Be mindful. The sky is falling.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu | "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  3. #23
    Just refer to it as a slide catch and chive on.

  4. #24
    Maybe the "instructor" uses a P320 - and you never know when those things will go off!

    Sorry, Monday Morning HATE for Sig.

    And, +1 to use the slide catch or slide release lever (different makers use the terms interchangably).

  5. #25
    When I worked at Cabela's we were instructed to not let customers use the slide catch when handling our display models because slamming the slide home on an empty chamber would damage the gun, apparently this was extra important with 1911s. Any truth to this?

  6. #26
    Member eb07's Avatar
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    I get all my advice from gun store employees and volunteer RO's at local ranges. Most are ex secret SEAL team 12 rangers who have haloed into trouble spots all over the globe to fight enemies of the US for the CIA. They know their firearms.

    I will continue to use the slide catch to release my slide when performing a reload as I have for 25 + years of handgun ownership.
    Last edited by eb07; 04-08-2019 at 08:42 AM.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Radar Love View Post
    When I worked at Cabela's we were instructed to not let customers use the slide catch when handling our display models because slamming the slide home on an empty chamber would damage the gun, apparently this was extra important with 1911s. Any truth to this?
    There is some truth to this.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Cunningham View Post
    There is some truth to this.
    Yup, some truth that one should not drop the slide without slowing the slide by hand on a 1911 on an empty chamber, regardless of whether the slide stop is used or the gun is sling shot. Chuck Rogers has stated that it is possible to damage the barrel and slide stop if the slide of a 1911 is dropped on an empty chamber. He also stated that if the hammer did not fall to the half-cock notch that no damage has been done to the action work. https://forums.1911forum.com/showpos...6&postcount=33

    When I started Bullseye, it was customary to charge the gun with the trigger pulled in order to protect the sear nose. The idea was to simulate how the gun functions when fired. Obviously if the order of operations was reversed (load before trigger pulled), there was a ND. So that practice has, thankfully, been made obsolete. I still see it with some older Bullseye competitors, but nearly as much as I did thirty years ago.

    This post shows how much the slide is slowed by feeding a round. https://forums.1911forum.com/showpos...47&postcount=1 Interesting that the shape of the 185-grain bullet slowed the slide the most.
    Last edited by farscott; 04-08-2019 at 09:08 AM.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radar Love View Post
    When I worked at Cabela's we were instructed to not let customers use the slide catch when handling our display models because slamming the slide home on an empty chamber would damage the gun, apparently this was extra important with 1911s. Any truth to this?
    Like Jay said, there is some truth to this -- and the damage could occur whether the slide catch is used or if the slide is pulled back and released with no magazine in the gun.


    *** ETA -- farscott beat me to it.
    Last edited by Robinson; 04-08-2019 at 09:09 AM.

  10. #30
    Thanks! Learned something new today

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