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Thread: The Balance of Speed, Accuracy and Assessment

  1. #11
    Site Supporter SeriousStudent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GyroF-16 View Post
    I second this thanks.

    And please tell DB that we miss him around here.
    I think that Darryl has been one of the highest-quality contributors to P-F over the past several years, and I’m not even a revolver junkie yet.
    Fixed it for you - just give it time.......

  2. #12
    Site Supporter JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blues View Post
    The other issue is that one must be able to articulate the reasons for taking their actions. Know what imminence means, know what grievous bodily harm is, what represents or may represent mortal peril if it should come to pass.

    All of these things must be evaluated in the seconds or fraction of a second before one's finger completes the pull of a trigger.

    LEO's and military are often second guessed by folks who have never been in the situation. Training and instruction help...but there's nothing like the real world as the ultimate teacher. Many of us are fortunate enough to say "there but for the grace of God go I". Others not as fortunate.
    You said LEO's AND military, which is a very vaiid inclusion. In low intensity war there is often an extreme level of restraint and discrimination expected.
    "I realized all the mindset talk was useless without action and that with action, all the mindset talk was unnecessary." - Mike Pannone

  3. #13
    politically incorrect blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHC View Post
    You said LEO's AND military, which is a very valid inclusion. In low intensity war there is often an extreme level of restraint and discrimination expected.
    I've been paying attention, brother.

    I have great respect for the demands placed on the military, physically, psychically, legally.

    Had the good fortune to train both alongside and under the tutelage of some excellent members of the armed services. Our own, as well as some elite units from abroad.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu | "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  4. #14
    Superb post -- thank you. Lends substance to something that was briefly touched on in the "Good article by Tam" thread: how training purely for a smooth draw and good hits can engender an indiscriminate reflex to shoot once the decision to draw has been made, short-circuiting critical -- here's the operative word -- assessment factors that might otherwise turn a "go" into a "no-go" between draw and trigger pull.

    Any recommendations for introducing an assessment element into daily dry fire practice and range drills?
    My stance on gun issues? Sort of a modified Weaver, I guess...

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by blues View Post
    The other issue is that one must be able to articulate the reasons for taking their actions. Know what imminence means, know what grievous bodily harm is, what represents or may represent mortal peril if it should come to pass.

    All of these things must be evaluated in the seconds or fraction of a second before one's finger completes the pull of a trigger.

    LEO's and military are often second guessed by folks who have never been in the situation. Training and instruction help...but there's nothing like the real world as the ultimate teacher. Many of us are fortunate enough to say "there but for the grace of God go I". Others not as fortunate.
    Spot on brother. Situational awareness and tactical response are linked; however, if you have #1 (Situational Awareness) you can often avoid #2 (Tactical Response). LEO's and citizens who lack #1 are often caught flat footed and into #2 before they know it. Those with #1 may not understand exactly what they are seeing, but they know that "hair raising on the back of the neck" feeling that something is not right, not good, and not to be pushed.

    I agree, articulation of these "feelings" is essential to defend oneself against the armchair quarterbacks and REMF's who inhabit the safe zones. They may never have experienced any of what you describe (barring having seen it on a video game...).

  6. #16
    If ever I was asked where the bar was set on Pistol Forum, I'd send them this with the introduction: "Gold Standard." Folks, it just doesn't get any better than this.

    Thanks to Wayne and Darryl, once again.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wingate's Hairbrush View Post
    Superb post -- thank you. Lends substance to something that was briefly touched on in the "Good article by Tam" thread: how training purely for a smooth draw and good hits can engender an indiscriminate reflex to shoot once the decision to draw has been made, short-circuiting critical -- here's the operative word -- assessment factors that might otherwise turn a "go" into a "no-go" between draw and trigger pull.

    Any recommendations for introducing an assessment element into daily dry fire practice and range drills?
    I'm not sure this really answers your question, but during dry practice I like to practice draws to a low ready position as well as draw and shoot. The low ready I prefer has the muzzle slightly offset to the left or right instead of pointing at the potential target.

  8. #18
    politically incorrect blues's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robinson View Post
    I'm not sure this really answers your question, but during dry practice I like to practice draws to a low ready position as well as draw and shoot. The low ready I prefer has the muzzle slightly offset to the left or right instead of pointing at the potential target.
    Alongside Mark's advice, ensuring that you keep your finger off the trigger, whether blue gun or real gun used for training, will assist with ingraining good habits in the field.

    It's too easy to go to the trigger automatically in training when one is "expecting" to employ the weapon. Doing so in the real world may lead to unintended consequences.

    Simple, and perhaps obvious...but important.
    “Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat.” - Sun Tzu | "Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth." - Mike Tyson

  9. #19
    Member 03RN's Avatar
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    Timely post.

    I had to draw my gun last week due to a few unleashed large dogs, my wife, infant, and a small dog. Kicking and harsh words solved the problem but my gun was out and I was quite aware of the front sight on the lead dogs shoulder.

    I am great full I didn't have to shoot the dog. Hopefully the owner learned a lesson.

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