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Thread: Why is Reloading a Big Part of Many Drills/Standards?

  1. #11
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Competition is a lot better if itís entertaining, and two-to-four round realistic scenarios make for very little entertainment. People like to bust caps. That leads to high round counts which leads to reloads, and a reload takes so much longer than shooting a target that it is a disproportionately valuable skill. Thatís just how shooting competitions are. The best way to avoid needing to be good at a bunch of useless bullshit and still shoot well under stress is to get involved in a training group and shoot surprise stages and man on man drills. It kicks the shit out of competition for skill building but is hard to hold together.

    One reason some people incorporate reloads in drills is that it forces a regrip or a disruption, and that has value. I prefer when itís done with movement or the like, but itís fine.

  2. #12
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell556 View Post
    I'm also open to reconsidering my opinion on civilian-based competition
    Our sport isn't going to change for you. You either accept it as it is or you go do something else.

    Learning how to reload a pistol quickly and efficiently isn't that f-ing hard. You make it sound like one has to spend hours upon hours a day doing it. Well you're wrong. If you spend 10 minutes a day every other day working on reloads, in less than three weeks you'll be more competent than about 85 - 90 % of the gun using population. Then sustaining that skill takes even less time.

    But I guess based on the lengthy list of other stuff you seem to think you need to train for, evidently you can't even spare that little amount.

    PS, what's your USPSA member number? Or IDPA member number? Or have you ever even competed in any practical pistol match? Because if you haven't why should any of us who have ever listen to your opinion about what is or isn't important to know or do well in those contests?
    Last edited by Alpha Sierra; 03-16-2019 at 06:08 PM.

  3. #13
    Pizzagun Dilettante Joe in PNG's Avatar
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    One can also make the point that by practicing fast reloads when shooting, one can spend more time shooting.
    "You win 100% of the fights you avoid. If you're not there when it happens, you don't lose." - William Aprill

  4. #14
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    You most certainly don't NEED to practice reloading at all. But if you want to play a gun game rather than just stand in a shooting stall and plink your whole ammo budget away, then having an efficient reload might be useful.

    I didn't always have access to a range that allows holster draws and rapid fire, and for an extremely long time, the only confirmation I got that my dry fire was even helping me a little was going to competition to see my technical shooting skill level relative to other shooters in a given division. Most shooting competitors have a higher grasp of technical shooting fundamentals than most laypeople, and some even more so than legally recognized experts (e.g. LEO/MIL).

    So seeing as the practical shooting game involves reloading, I'll devote maybe five or ten minutes three times a week to stuffing a magazine in my gun. Depending on the division you shoot, you don't have to reload much, but I wasn't about to start fishing mags out of a pocket because I was too cheap to spring for a mag pouch.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

  5. #15
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell556 View Post
    What if instead of reloading, you did type 1 clearance drill instead?
    I noticed you never talk about clearing type 2 malfunctions. You know, the one that's much easier and faster to fix when you have an extra magazine that you never carry because you don't think you ever need it.

    Do you ever practice clearing double feeds? And if you do, how long do they take with that one magazine that you think is all a civilian needs and may well BE the source of the double feed? Now what?

    Do you mind addressing that?

  6. #16
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    and a reload takes so much longer than shooting a target
    That's why they're mostly done when not engaging targets, such as when moving to shoot from some other place. Standing reloads are for suckers.

  7. #17
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    That's why they're mostly done when not engaging targets, such as when moving to shoot from some other place. Standing reloads are for suckers.
    And standards, if they still do those. Regardless, you need to be able to reload quickly and automatically enough to complete movement and positioning while reloading to do well in gun games, and thatís just part of the game. If you like the game play by the rules and do what you must to excel.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    I noticed you never talk about clearing type 2 malfunctions. You know, the one that's much easier and faster to fix when you have an extra magazine that you never carry because you don't think you ever need it.

    Do you ever practice clearing double feeds? And if you do, how long do they take with that one magazine that you think is all a civilian needs and may well BE the source of the double feed? Now what?

    Do you mind addressing that?
    I do practice type 2 but not at speed. I consider that to be similar to reloads. If I need to clear a type 2 malfunction in a civilian shooting I will need to transition to something else quickly. I struggle to envision a scenario where having a type 2 malfunction, even with a spare mag on my person, is a survivable event if I donít transition to something else.

    Lock slide to rear, drop mag, rack slide 3x, insert old or fresh mag. Rack slide.

    What is the bad guy doing while Iím doing that?

    Iím open to hearing some realistic scenarios where this might arise and I am willing to be swayed by evidence. I regularly change my mind about stuff as i get new experience and information.

  9. #19
    Member HopetonBrown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by powell556 View Post

    Lock slide to rear, drop mag, rack slide 3x, insert old or fresh mag. Rack slide.
    That's a type 3.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by HopetonBrown View Post
    That's a type 3.
    Sorry. I was confused because the question was about whether I trained Type 2, so I was thinking it was the "second" type of clearance snf mixed it up with the Type 3. Isn't the clearance method for Type 1 and Type 2 the same? Doesn't a tap/rack also clear a stovepipe?

    I thought tap/rack cleared type 1 and type 2 and then the lock slide to rear, drop mag, rack slide 3x, insert fresh mag, rack slide is the only second clearance method?

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