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Thread: DA/SA vs SFA vs ... -- 2019 Edition

  1. #101
    I think it is quite simple, people want a trigger that is as forgiving as a LEM or DAO but to be as easy to shoot as a tuned shadow or 9mm 1911. Until then, this discussion always comes back around.

    I think many people get too wrapped up in triggers and analyze stuff so much that they perceive it to be a bigger issue then it is. Sometimes I think people just get board because they analyze every minute detail about hardware.
    Last edited by EVP; 02-10-2019 at 09:06 PM.

  2. #102
    Weíve been here before...

    DBís Diatribe On Triggers

    General Thoughts On DA/SA Triggers

    Put me in the camp of hammer-fired, more aptly DA/SA or LEM, having significant safety advantages over SFA designs.
    ďThe only thing worse than losing is quitting.Ē - Sean M

  3. #103
    There are a lot of different thoughts going on in this thread. Itís starting to get a little muddled for me.

    Random thoughts that apply to me.

    I believe that some trigger systems fit some people better than others. For whatever reason one trigger will click with someone better than another. Itís all about feel. I struggle with the wall on striker guns but deal very well with DA. The DA smooths me out and takes away my tendency to anticipate a SF trigger.

    If youíre comfortable with the trigger you are using youíre less likely to make mistakes. Decocking a TDA gun feels really natural for me. Itís part of the process of firing a shot. Even during dry fire I will finish my string and decock. Oddly, when I go back to SFA I have to think about not decocking. Iíve tried to hit the decocker on a Glock multiple times. It feels unnatural to holster a pistol without that step.

    Switching trigger types canít happen overnight. Shooting a lot of different actions is asking for trouble especially under stress.

    You have to mentally accept the trigger you are carrying. If you are forced to move to something different by your employer you have to accept it and commit to it.

    TDA is not less safe than striker. TDA can be shot just as well as striker. TDA takes more practice to stay proficient with than striker. I think most NDís happen during administrative handling. Doesnít matter what the trigger type is the startle reflex will cause an ND if your finger is on the trigger.

  4. #104
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonInWA View Post
    There are also some extremely credentialed professionals on the forum here who may be able more authoritatively chime in.
    As long as their credentials include doctorates in the scientific fields that study human learning, I'm all ears.

  5. #105
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    First shot accuracy is why I preferred SFA's for many years.

    This is my thought process moving to DA/SA Berettas:

    After learning more about the mechanics of the system, then the giant goat-fuck 320 disaster happens, I started to question if I should switch.

    My decision to go all in on DA/SA was less about layers of protection against UD , but mechanical defects.

    My preferred SFA is a Glock...so what happens if Glock has a bad run of parts and it leads to the sear disengaging, or if the blind firing pin block gets stuck, or the spring is weak...etc,

    When compared to a 92 at least, there is a "zero energy" trigger and a plethora of other indirect safety features.

    I can't afford an ND and unpaid time off work.

    I am working through perfecting the DA pull and paying my training tax. It gets a bit better every range session.

    On the childish side...I enjoy going to range with 92s. The looks on people's face when an 8" handgun comes out of the range bag is fucking priceless. My inner hipster is satisfied.
    Last edited by fixer; 02-11-2019 at 06:13 AM.

  6. #106
    Member Alpha Sierra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixer View Post
    I am working through perfecting the DA pull and paying my training tax. It gets a bit better every range session.
    Dry fire is your friend

  7. #107
    Hobbyist JAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixer;843951.

    My decision to go all in on DA/SA was less about layers of protection against UD , [B
    but mechanical defects.
    [/B]
    My preferred SFA is a Glock...so what happens if Glock has a bad run of parts and it leads to the sear disengaging, or if the blind firing pin block gets stuck, or the spring is weak...etc,.
    How often has a defect cause a Glock pistol to fire? How often have people had accidental discharges with them that might have been prevented by the habit of riding the hammer?

    I donít like Glocks or feel that theyíre particularly safe out of the box (I do carry them with an SCD) but your reasoning seems specious. It sounds a lot like you donít want to admit that you could have an AD.

    Someone who /can/ admit that wants as many layers of safety as they can get without severely compromising the use of the pistol.

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by fixer View Post
    First shot accuracy is why I preferred SFA's for many years.

    This is my thought process moving to DA/SA Berettas:

    After learning more about the mechanics of the system, then the giant goat-fuck 320 disaster happens, I started to question if I should switch.

    My decision to go all in on DA/SA was less about layers of protection against UD , but mechanical defects.

    My preferred SFA is a Glock...so what happens if Glock has a bad run of parts and it leads to the sear disengaging, or if the blind firing pin block gets stuck, or the spring is weak...etc,

    When compared to a 92 at least, there is a "zero energy" trigger and a plethora of other indirect safety features.

    I can't afford an ND and unpaid time off work.

    I am working through perfecting the DA pull and paying my training tax. It gets a bit better every range session.

    On the childish side...I enjoy going to range with 92s. The looks on people's face when an 8" handgun comes out of the range bag is fucking priceless. My inner hipster is satisfied.
    I've been shooting a DA/SA for sometime now. I don't find the transition to be difficult or even something I think about. The first DA pull can be a factor and when I take new shooters out they often have trouble with the long travel and weight [I have D springs in both 92's]. For me staying proficient with a DA revolver is a huge help.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCountyGuy View Post
    Weíve been here before...

    DBís Diatribe On Triggers

    General Thoughts On DA/SA Triggers

    Put me in the camp of hammer-fired, more aptly DA/SA or LEM, having significant safety advantages over SFA designs.
    and this one

    https://pistol-forum.com/showthread....d-consequences

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by M2CattleCo View Post
    ... at least you get lower hit probability on the first shot.
    Has not been my experience. With similar amounts of practice, I see no significant difference on things like FAST, Find your Level, etc. between P226 and Glock 17.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    Legitimate question for those who say DA/SA is too complicated. Do you have an AR15? If so, why? Don't you think you could forget to engage the safety and sling around a cocked rifle with not even a drop safety?
    Well, I'm not one who says it's too complicated but it's certainly possible to forget a safety. And in both directions, pulling a dead trigger because the safety is on or slinging an off-safe weapon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alpha Sierra View Post
    As long as their credentials include doctorates in the scientific fields that study human learning, I'm all ears.
    The book "Talent is Overrated" might be of interest to you. https://www.amazon.com/Talent-Overra.../dp/1591842948

    Quote Originally Posted by JAD View Post
    How often has a defect cause a Glock pistol to fire? How often have people had accidental discharges with them that might have been prevented by the habit of riding the hammer?
    I have literally never dealt with a case where a STOCK Glock fired due to a defect. However I've dealt with quite a few that riding a hammer (or equivalent) would have prevented. Also at least one discharge in a hooded duty holster a hammer would have prevented.
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