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Thread: DA/SA vs SFA vs ... -- 2019 Edition

  1. #191
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_Jones View Post
    I realize it's a chicken/egg thing with many people (especially on the internet), but I highly doubt that Glock marketing preceded Glock engineering.
    Certainly they had marketing back then, but it was all focused on selling shovels.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  2. #192
    Site Supporter JHC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom_Jones View Post
    I realize it's a chicken/egg thing with many people (especially on the internet), but I highly doubt that Glock marketing preceded Glock engineering.


    Gaston was brilliant or lucky to design the mechanism to be categorized as DAO by the ATF I guess. (I've long understood that was the case, the ATF part.)
    "I realized all the mindset talk was useless without action and that with action, all the mindset talk was unnecessary." - Mike Pannone

  3. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by BehindBlueI's View Post
    It wasn't for me. It was easy to get to a very high success rate, and essentially a 100% success rate in static drills. Where it became more problematic was when entangled, when being jerked around by a training partner who was significantly more skilled then me at hand to hand, etc. The "gripping the pistol correctly" part became harder to do, or at least consistently. Real world side, I've had several people fail to fire their gun when they wanted to because they didn't defeat the safety and bad things then happened. I've also had my thumb broken to the point it was useless (bones at the base broke) during a struggle with a suspect.

    Personally, I have no use for a manual safety on a handgun. Long guns, fine, it's not a an entangled fight gun. Handguns, not for me.
    Well-said. I say this as a 1911 user. I have never failed to operate a 1911 thumb safety, when I intended to drop the hammer, but have failed to operate other pistols’ active manual safety devices. This is why, for example, I do not use a Browning Hi-Power for defensive purposes, and if I were to buy a Beretta 92/M9-ish weapon, it will probably be a G version. (A prominently-protruding safety can be accidentally bumped “on,” as well as “off.”) My brain seems hard-wired to operate the thumb safety of a “real” 1911, but not necessarily the thumb safeties of other handguns.

    Additionally, with a 1911, and some few other designs, there is the added task of depressing the grip safety a sufficient distance to allow the weapon to fire. An improper grip could happen at the initiation of the draw, or could occur with the weapon in-hand, with a physical struggle, as mentioned by BBI, being a potential cause. (Of course, these same factors work against one’s opponent if the weapon is snatched.)

    I reluctantly transitioned from 1911 to Glock in 2002, for duty carry, because the then-mandated Safariland 070 required releasing the retention devices before attaining a proper grip with the weapon hand, with the weapon hand in a chicken-winged position. During quals, and training prior to 2002, this had not been seen as anything worse than an annoyance, but with my employer’s move back to patrol rifles, in the wake of the terrorist attack in September 2001, I was having failures to operate the grip safety during full-speed rifle-to-handgun transition exercises. (The age- and nerve-damage-related thinning of my skinny, boney hands may have contributed; less “meat” to interface with the grip safety.)

    Notably, these failures to operate the grip safety occurred with pistols having a subtle extension, to facilitate depressing the grip safety. Installing grip safeties with prominent “speed bumps” would have helped, but I did not want to operate that close to the margin. The hardware problem was a holster, designed for a specific purpose, that made attaining a proper grip problematic. (In my opinion, the Safariland SSIII/070 is a very good revolver holster, but a poorly-designed* auto-pistol holster, at least for many autopistols, and yes, I know the legendary Bill Rogers designed the thing.) The work-around was to use a pistol that was more-forgiving of being improperly gripped. (Bill Rogers redeemed himself by designing the Safariland ALS/SLS series of holsters.)

    Notably, I was able to qual with 1911 pistols again in 2016, when my outgoing chief added the 1911 to the list of approved duty pistols. The Safariland 6360 being the authorized duty rig, by then, meant that attaining a proper firing grip was not a problem. Even so, the necessity of MAINTAINING the proper firing grip remains vital.

  4. #194
    I wish all bad guys would carry j frames so then I could carry a j frame and not feel out gunned. That would be my utopia.

  5. #195
    Quote Originally Posted by 10mmfanboy View Post
    I wish all bad guys would carry j frames so then I could carry a j frame and not feel out gunned. That would be my utopia.
    Well, you’d still need them to attack in groups of 1, 2 at the most.

  6. #196
    Quote Originally Posted by 10mmfanboy View Post
    I wish all bad guys would carry j frames so then I could carry a j frame and not feel out gunned. That would be my utopia.
    Just carry multiple j frames.

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