View Poll Results: Is it OK for your muzzle to dip after the trigger is pressed with a dummy round?

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  • Yes

    14 73.68%
  • No

    5 26.32%
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Thread: Is post trigger push really a thing?

  1. #11
    Site Supporter Peally's Avatar
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    Mar 2014
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    Wisconsin, USA
    Once the bullet leaves the gun it doesn't matter if you twirl it in your finger cartoon style.

    I'll slightly dip the gun if it surprises me and doesn't go off, but it doesn't affect my accuracy. Pre-ignition push however is bad and lots of dry and live fire will iron it out.
    Last edited by Peally; 02-10-2019 at 09:48 PM.
    Semper Gumby, Always Flexible

  2. #12
    Site Supporter P.E. Kelley's Avatar
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    Jan 2015
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    Dry-side of Washington State
    Quote Originally Posted by Peally View Post
    Once the bullet leaves the gun it doesn't matter if you twirl it in your finger cartoon style.

    I'll slightly dip the gun if it surprises me and doesn't go off, but it doesn't affect my accuracy. Pre-ignition push however is bad and lots of dry and live fire will iron it out.
    You are so right, You can spin the gun like crazy so long that the bullet leaves the muzzle and the desired point in time.
    Guns are just machines and without you they can do no harm, nor any good

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by P.E. Kelley View Post
    You are so right, You can spin the gun like crazy so long that the bullet leaves the muzzle and the desired point in time.
    Yes, but the problem is when you start pushing on the gun before the bullet leaves the barrel.
    Likes pretty much everything in every caliber.

  4. #14
    For me, the key to staving off flinch is dryfire. I believe dryfire is extremely important.

    I am not okay with the gun "dipping down" after firing either, if I'm doing that, it means I'm not squeezing the trigger straight back, as I should be.

  5. #15
    Member
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    Dec 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati Ohio
    This^^^^
    I'm in this camp.
    Dean,
    “The duty of a patriot is to protect his country from its government.” - Thomas Paine
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  6. #16
    Member Rapid Butterfly's Avatar
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    Jan 2019
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    Salem, Oregon
    Quote Originally Posted by scw2 View Post
    Dry fire helps. It won’t help with your recoil control which is going to come in live fire. If you’re pressing the trigger at a realistic force and speed in dry fire and you’re honest with yourself regarding the sights, flinching or any other imperfections causing misalignment of the gun should show itself. Also be sure not to cheat the grip.
    Please forgive a likely elementary question. Can you explain what is meant by ‘cheat the grip’? I’ve decided to try to do a lot more dry fire and plan to start working through Stoeger’s Dry Fire reloaded. Trying to learn.
    audite semper, semper discendum

  7. #17
    Site Supporter
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    Mar 2011
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    West Virginia
    Quote Originally Posted by ViniVidivici View Post

    I am not okay with the gun "dipping down" after firing either, if I'm doing that, it means I'm not squeezing the trigger straight back, as I should be.
    What does one have to do with the other?

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Rapid Butterfly View Post
    Please forgive a likely elementary question. Can you explain what is meant by ‘cheat the grip’? I’ve decided to try to do a lot more dry fire and plan to start working through Stoeger’s Dry Fire reloaded. Trying to learn.
    Not at all, I wasn’t clear.

    It can be easy to grip with less force from how you shoot in live fire, which can then negatively effect your live fire. I guess more broadly any difference that isn’t intentional due to physical or mental fatigue when you’re dry firing probably isn’t good.

  9. #19
    Site Supporter P.E. Kelley's Avatar
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    Jan 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by GJM View Post
    Yes, but the problem is when you start pushing on the gun before the bullet leaves the barrel.
    DUH!
    Guns are just machines and without you they can do no harm, nor any good

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by P.E. Kelley View Post
    ...in Slow fire means I do not try to have the gun
    return to the point of aim of the previous shot. The muzzle lifts and hangs there.
    In timed and rapid I put more control into the gun to have the sight return to the target center.

    ....

    In the speed games with must add more control into the gun (grip and the mental intent to return the gun to the desired impact point ASAP) and post ignition push is an additional element to let us break multiple shots accurately at speed.
    I could be doing it wrong, but this describes how I perform when shooting single bullseye vs. speed shooting. I have several video's that show what may be perceived to be a very prominant flinch on a dead chamber when speed shooting. It is caused by what I am trying to do post iginition.

    I am sure different people use different techniques for great results.

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